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  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036650
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The trend towards the globalization of factor, product and financial markets is drawing an increasing amount of attention. Work is underway to develop methodologies and to harmonize among countries data on the economic activities of globally operating corporations. An understanding of their business models, corporate strategies and organizational structures is also needed to gather and, more importantly, interpret information about their innovation activities. This note identifies four main models of globally operating corporations according to their impact on technology transfer and innovation in their host countries.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036654
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many people in the federal and provincial governments, in universities, hospitals and other organizations are asking the same questions about the commercialization of university research: Is it increasing? What are the benefits? How do universities and regions compare? Statistics Canada's 2001 Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector shows that commercialization activities took a giant leap from 1999 to 2001. This article includes the results for universities only.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036656
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999 collected information on the innovation activities of firms in Canadian manufacturing and selected natural resource industries. The results provide insight into why a firm chooses to take the path of innovation or opts to be a non-innovator. For most non-innovators, the perception is that innovation is not required or is irrelevant to their industry. Non-innovative firms analysed here are those that did not introduce a new or significantly improved product or process in the previous three years and that did not carry out any innovative activities during the survey period.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003012
    Description:

    In 2001, Statistics Canada conducted the third Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector, which was designed to illuminate the overall process of intellectual property (IP) management. Over 100 universities, degree-granting colleges and affiliated research hospitals took part in this voluntary survey. The results show that over 60% of institutions are actively managing (identifying, protecting, promoting and/or commercializing) their IP. Royalties from licensing increased from $18.9 million in 1999 to $44.4 million in 2001. To date, universities and research hospitals have created a total of 680 spin-off companies.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026560
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Food processing is one of Canada's largest manufacturing industries, consisting of more than 3,000 establishments. Employing close to 230,000 people in 1998, it boasted a gross domestic product of $15 billion that same year. The relationship between the use of advanced manufacturing technology and firm performance during the 1990s, as measured by growth in labour productivity and growth in market share, is the subject of a recently released Statistics Canada study, which finds that a high-technology orientation is closely associated with success.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003005
    Description:

    The main indicators of biotechnology activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Within the last few years, except for the amount of financing capital raised, an increase in all the indicators was noticed. For example, the number of innovative firms involved in biotechnology activities rose from 358 in 1999 to 375 in 2001. The Human Health sector outpaces all the other sectors in terms of the number of firms, human resources, biotechnology revenues, biotechnology research and development expenditures, amount of financing capital raised, and the number of products in the pipeline. Contrary to medium-sized and large firms where the personnel is more homogenous, small firms employ mostly highly-qualified workers. The 2001 data show a maturing trend in small firms. Most firms could not hire enough people to fill all their vacancies (estimated at 953 positions in Canada) for the 2001 year.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003006
    Description:

    This working paper is based on a speech delivered by Judith Maxwell, President of the Canadian Policy Research Networks. In her discourse, Ms. Maxwell challenged her listeners to 'think outside of the box' on innovation and to be creative in how they approached the topic. For her, innovation extends beyond economic activities into societal interactions and culture. Therefore, innovation translates into more than productivity growth and improved efficiency, but also better living, working and learning conditions.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003007
    Description:

    This article presents findings from a 2001 Canadian pilot survey on the use of knowledge management practices by firms. Of the firms surveyed, 9 out of 10 firms reported using at least 1 of the 23 knowledge management practices that were studied. This survey, a world first by a statistical agency, measured the extent to which knowledge management practices were used by Canadian businesses in forestry and logging; chemical manufacturing; transportation equipment manufacturing; machinery, equipment and supply wholesaler-distributors; and management, scientific and technical consulting services. The reasons for and the results of using knowledge management practices, as well as the practices themselves, are examined by firm size and by type of adopter.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002017
    Description:

    This paper is an exploratory study to help us identify and characterize innovation practices in Canada's dynamic service industries. It uses logistical estimates to demonstrate that innovation in the services sector is not homogeneous. For each type of innovation 'product, process or both. there is a different business strategy. Small firms do more product innovation, and clients, along with fairs and exhibitions, appear to be the primary sources of information.

    Product innovation is generally done by technical services industries. Process innovation does not seem to favour any particular sector but, understandably, the factors that have the most impact on this type of innovation are company flexibility and information from patent literature, consulting firms and internal management. The most complex strategy-for both product and process innovation-is associated with large firms in the communications and finance sub-sectors. This type of innovation has a larger number of significant factors than the other two types. Finally, this paper shows that there are differences among the forms of innovation and that these differences apply within individual sub-sectors.

    Release date: 2003-01-15
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  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036650
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The trend towards the globalization of factor, product and financial markets is drawing an increasing amount of attention. Work is underway to develop methodologies and to harmonize among countries data on the economic activities of globally operating corporations. An understanding of their business models, corporate strategies and organizational structures is also needed to gather and, more importantly, interpret information about their innovation activities. This note identifies four main models of globally operating corporations according to their impact on technology transfer and innovation in their host countries.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036654
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many people in the federal and provincial governments, in universities, hospitals and other organizations are asking the same questions about the commercialization of university research: Is it increasing? What are the benefits? How do universities and regions compare? Statistics Canada's 2001 Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector shows that commercialization activities took a giant leap from 1999 to 2001. This article includes the results for universities only.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036656
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999 collected information on the innovation activities of firms in Canadian manufacturing and selected natural resource industries. The results provide insight into why a firm chooses to take the path of innovation or opts to be a non-innovator. For most non-innovators, the perception is that innovation is not required or is irrelevant to their industry. Non-innovative firms analysed here are those that did not introduce a new or significantly improved product or process in the previous three years and that did not carry out any innovative activities during the survey period.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003012
    Description:

    In 2001, Statistics Canada conducted the third Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector, which was designed to illuminate the overall process of intellectual property (IP) management. Over 100 universities, degree-granting colleges and affiliated research hospitals took part in this voluntary survey. The results show that over 60% of institutions are actively managing (identifying, protecting, promoting and/or commercializing) their IP. Royalties from licensing increased from $18.9 million in 1999 to $44.4 million in 2001. To date, universities and research hospitals have created a total of 680 spin-off companies.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026560
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Food processing is one of Canada's largest manufacturing industries, consisting of more than 3,000 establishments. Employing close to 230,000 people in 1998, it boasted a gross domestic product of $15 billion that same year. The relationship between the use of advanced manufacturing technology and firm performance during the 1990s, as measured by growth in labour productivity and growth in market share, is the subject of a recently released Statistics Canada study, which finds that a high-technology orientation is closely associated with success.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003005
    Description:

    The main indicators of biotechnology activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Within the last few years, except for the amount of financing capital raised, an increase in all the indicators was noticed. For example, the number of innovative firms involved in biotechnology activities rose from 358 in 1999 to 375 in 2001. The Human Health sector outpaces all the other sectors in terms of the number of firms, human resources, biotechnology revenues, biotechnology research and development expenditures, amount of financing capital raised, and the number of products in the pipeline. Contrary to medium-sized and large firms where the personnel is more homogenous, small firms employ mostly highly-qualified workers. The 2001 data show a maturing trend in small firms. Most firms could not hire enough people to fill all their vacancies (estimated at 953 positions in Canada) for the 2001 year.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003006
    Description:

    This working paper is based on a speech delivered by Judith Maxwell, President of the Canadian Policy Research Networks. In her discourse, Ms. Maxwell challenged her listeners to 'think outside of the box' on innovation and to be creative in how they approached the topic. For her, innovation extends beyond economic activities into societal interactions and culture. Therefore, innovation translates into more than productivity growth and improved efficiency, but also better living, working and learning conditions.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003007
    Description:

    This article presents findings from a 2001 Canadian pilot survey on the use of knowledge management practices by firms. Of the firms surveyed, 9 out of 10 firms reported using at least 1 of the 23 knowledge management practices that were studied. This survey, a world first by a statistical agency, measured the extent to which knowledge management practices were used by Canadian businesses in forestry and logging; chemical manufacturing; transportation equipment manufacturing; machinery, equipment and supply wholesaler-distributors; and management, scientific and technical consulting services. The reasons for and the results of using knowledge management practices, as well as the practices themselves, are examined by firm size and by type of adopter.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002017
    Description:

    This paper is an exploratory study to help us identify and characterize innovation practices in Canada's dynamic service industries. It uses logistical estimates to demonstrate that innovation in the services sector is not homogeneous. For each type of innovation 'product, process or both. there is a different business strategy. Small firms do more product innovation, and clients, along with fairs and exhibitions, appear to be the primary sources of information.

    Product innovation is generally done by technical services industries. Process innovation does not seem to favour any particular sector but, understandably, the factors that have the most impact on this type of innovation are company flexibility and information from patent literature, consulting firms and internal management. The most complex strategy-for both product and process innovation-is associated with large firms in the communications and finance sub-sectors. This type of innovation has a larger number of significant factors than the other two types. Finally, this paper shows that there are differences among the forms of innovation and that these differences apply within individual sub-sectors.

    Release date: 2003-01-15
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