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All (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003013
    Description:

    This paper used data from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey (BUDS) to look into bioproduct development using biotechnologies. Results show that the development of bioproducts has become an intrinsic part of the activities of Canadian biotechnology firms.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026561
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Nanotechnology is an emerging technology. Has it reached the point that warrants the development of a comprehensive statistical measurement program? If so, what indicators should be used? Major spending initiatives in nanotechnology investing are currently underway. There is precedence for using developed methods and techniques to address the questions 'who,' 'what,' 'where' and 'why.' Statistics Canada's experience may be invaluable in the development of a nanotechnology statistical program.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026570
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2001, Canadian biotech firms raised $980 million in financing capital, a sharp drop from the $2.1 billion raised in 1999. Overall, 114 firms out of 188 (61%) that attempted to raise capital either failed or did not reach their targets. Why are biotech firms encountering difficulties in raising financing capital?

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026571
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article presents the results of a study that looks at the characteristics of Canadian biotechnology firms that form strategic alliances and measures the impact that such alliances have on their performance indicators.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-001-X20030047882
    Description:

    Biotechnology is an enabling technology - one that has been compared to electricity or microelectronics - because it has the potential to transform production processes, products and services in a wide range of sectors of the economy. At present, major applications of biotechnology are taking place in health, agrifood, and natural resources (e.g. forestry and mining). This survey is intended to quantify the level of industrial activity in biotechnology Research and Development by sector of application and to reveal trends in spending.

    Release date: 2003-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003005
    Description:

    The main indicators of biotechnology activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Within the last few years, except for the amount of financing capital raised, an increase in all the indicators was noticed. For example, the number of innovative firms involved in biotechnology activities rose from 358 in 1999 to 375 in 2001. The Human Health sector outpaces all the other sectors in terms of the number of firms, human resources, biotechnology revenues, biotechnology research and development expenditures, amount of financing capital raised, and the number of products in the pipeline. Contrary to medium-sized and large firms where the personnel is more homogenous, small firms employ mostly highly-qualified workers. The 2001 data show a maturing trend in small firms. Most firms could not hire enough people to fill all their vacancies (estimated at 953 positions in Canada) for the 2001 year.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003003
    Description:

    Results show that biotechnology companies in Canada are experiencing rapid growth and that Statistics Canada is now capturing more biotechnology activity. For example, between 1997 and 1999, Canadian biotechnology firms grew in number with core biotechnology firms increasing from 282 firms to 358. They brought in $1.9 billion in biotechnology revenues in 1999, compared with $813 million in 1997; they spent around $827 million on biotechnology research and development in 1999, compared with $494 million in 1997.

    Release date: 2003-03-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016474
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    In 2001, there were 375 biotechnology innovator firms in Canada, an increase of just under 5% from the 358 firms in 1999. Analysis beyond these overall statistics discloses a dynamic churning that is occurring among sectors, provinces and size groups.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016475
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey show that human resources in biotechnology increased substantially between 1999 and 2001. In this article, we attempt to answer two questions: What are the characteristics of the human resources engaged in the biotechnology field in Canada? Moreover, what are the main factors that contributed to the growth of these human resources in 2001?

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016476
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canadian biotechnology is gaining momentum. More firms are getting their products onto the markets and increasing revenues. With the human health sector leading the way, biotechnology revenues rose by a massive 343% for the 1997 to 2001 period, reaching $3.5 billion in 2001. During this same period, the number of firms increased by 33%.

    Release date: 2003-02-18
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Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003013
    Description:

    This paper used data from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey (BUDS) to look into bioproduct development using biotechnologies. Results show that the development of bioproducts has become an intrinsic part of the activities of Canadian biotechnology firms.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026561
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Nanotechnology is an emerging technology. Has it reached the point that warrants the development of a comprehensive statistical measurement program? If so, what indicators should be used? Major spending initiatives in nanotechnology investing are currently underway. There is precedence for using developed methods and techniques to address the questions 'who,' 'what,' 'where' and 'why.' Statistics Canada's experience may be invaluable in the development of a nanotechnology statistical program.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026570
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2001, Canadian biotech firms raised $980 million in financing capital, a sharp drop from the $2.1 billion raised in 1999. Overall, 114 firms out of 188 (61%) that attempted to raise capital either failed or did not reach their targets. Why are biotech firms encountering difficulties in raising financing capital?

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026571
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article presents the results of a study that looks at the characteristics of Canadian biotechnology firms that form strategic alliances and measures the impact that such alliances have on their performance indicators.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-001-X20030047882
    Description:

    Biotechnology is an enabling technology - one that has been compared to electricity or microelectronics - because it has the potential to transform production processes, products and services in a wide range of sectors of the economy. At present, major applications of biotechnology are taking place in health, agrifood, and natural resources (e.g. forestry and mining). This survey is intended to quantify the level of industrial activity in biotechnology Research and Development by sector of application and to reveal trends in spending.

    Release date: 2003-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003005
    Description:

    The main indicators of biotechnology activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Within the last few years, except for the amount of financing capital raised, an increase in all the indicators was noticed. For example, the number of innovative firms involved in biotechnology activities rose from 358 in 1999 to 375 in 2001. The Human Health sector outpaces all the other sectors in terms of the number of firms, human resources, biotechnology revenues, biotechnology research and development expenditures, amount of financing capital raised, and the number of products in the pipeline. Contrary to medium-sized and large firms where the personnel is more homogenous, small firms employ mostly highly-qualified workers. The 2001 data show a maturing trend in small firms. Most firms could not hire enough people to fill all their vacancies (estimated at 953 positions in Canada) for the 2001 year.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003003
    Description:

    Results show that biotechnology companies in Canada are experiencing rapid growth and that Statistics Canada is now capturing more biotechnology activity. For example, between 1997 and 1999, Canadian biotechnology firms grew in number with core biotechnology firms increasing from 282 firms to 358. They brought in $1.9 billion in biotechnology revenues in 1999, compared with $813 million in 1997; they spent around $827 million on biotechnology research and development in 1999, compared with $494 million in 1997.

    Release date: 2003-03-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016474
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    In 2001, there were 375 biotechnology innovator firms in Canada, an increase of just under 5% from the 358 firms in 1999. Analysis beyond these overall statistics discloses a dynamic churning that is occurring among sectors, provinces and size groups.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016475
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey show that human resources in biotechnology increased substantially between 1999 and 2001. In this article, we attempt to answer two questions: What are the characteristics of the human resources engaged in the biotechnology field in Canada? Moreover, what are the main factors that contributed to the growth of these human resources in 2001?

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016476
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canadian biotechnology is gaining momentum. More firms are getting their products onto the markets and increasing revenues. With the human health sector leading the way, biotechnology revenues rose by a massive 343% for the 1997 to 2001 period, reaching $3.5 billion in 2001. During this same period, the number of firms increased by 33%.

    Release date: 2003-02-18
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