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All (18)

All (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2008022
    Description:

    Many historical comparisons of international productivity use measures of labour productivity (output per worker). Differences in labour productivity can be caused by differences in technical efficiency or differences in capital intensity. Moving to measures of total factor productivity allows international comparisons to ascertain whether differences in labour productivity arise from differences in efficiency or differences in factors utilized in the production process.

    This paper examines differences in output per worker in the manufacturing sectors of Canada and the United States in 1929 and the extent to which it arises from efficiency differences. It makes corrections for differences in capital and materials intensity per worker in order to derive a measure of total factor efficiency of Canada relative to the United States, using detailed industry data. It finds that while output per worker in Canada was only about 75% of the United States productivity level, the total factor productivity measure of Canada was about the same as the United States level - that is, there was very little difference in technical efficiency in the two countries. Canada's lower output per worker was the result of the use of less capital and materials per worker than the United States.

    Release date: 2008-12-23

  • Table: 26-202-X
    Description:

    This publication presents early estimates of mineral production by class and by province, quantities and values.

    Release date: 2008-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210741
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Innovation commercialization, the process of introducing a new or significantly improved product to market, is an important innovation activity for a plant and is the final stage in new product development. Without successful commercialization, innovations may not return any benefits for a plant's innovation efforts. The Survey of Innovation 2005 asked innovative manufacturing plants questions related to commercialization activities and provides information on the type of these activities being undertaken. Market success is measured in terms of the share of revenues in 2004 from product innovations introduced during the years 2002 to 2004.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210742
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In its recently released science and technology (S&T) strategy, Mobilizing Science and Technology to Canada's Advantage (Government of Canada 2007), the federal government stated its commitment to improving its ability to measure and report on the impact of federal S&T expenditures. In response to this challenge, the Policy Research Initiative (PRI) collaborated with departments and agencies that conduct and fund S&T to explore these issues. This article provides a summary from one of the PRI reports, The Transmission of Technology and Knowledge to Innovative Manufacturing Firms by Publicly Funded Research Organizations.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Table: 26-201-X
    Description:

    The review presents detailed and recent statistics of the mining industry, including the production and the value of minerals by kind and by province. It also presents historical tables of values by main groups, the average prices of leading minerals and principal statistics by main group and by province, and diamond drilling of deposits other than fuels. It includes explanatory notes and a bibliography.

    Release date: 2008-10-23

  • 6. Metal Ore Mining Archived
    Table: 26-223-X
    Description:

    This annual publication presents data on establishments, employment, payroll, materials, supplies and contract services. It also shows the production, shipments and drillings completed. It includes lists of establishments showing employment size ranges, terms and definitions and a bibliography.

    Release date: 2008-10-16

  • Table: 26-226-X
    Description:

    This publication presents data on establishments, employment, payroll, material and supplies used, fuel and electricity, as well as on production and shipments. Data are presented by province. It includes a list of establishments, definitions and a bibliography.

    This publication covers NAICS 2123: Stone Mining and Quarrying; Sand, Gravel, Clay, and Ceramic and Refractory Minerals Mining and Quarrying; Other Non-Metallic Mineral Mining and Quarrying.

    Release date: 2008-10-10

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010646
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Food is as much a necessity as the air we breathe and the water we drink. But do we know where our food comes from, and what it takes to get it into our kitchens? The question of where our food is grown or processed is coming under increased scrutiny, not just in Canada but in other countries, including our trading partners. Concerns underlying this increased focus include discussions of energy consumption required for food transport, environmental concerns, product safety, food security and food costs. The article, Fork in the Road, takes a look at the trade in food and shows how Canadians can find out what foods are being produced in their local area.

    Release date: 2008-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800610626
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada stands to profit from the surge in food prices. Producers already have seen food exports hit a record high early in 2008. While consumers pay more for bread and cereals, this has been offset by stable or lower prices for other foodstuffs.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110584
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Innovation 2005, this article will examine the use of patents by Canadian manufacturing plants. Survey findings establish that plants use strategic methods more than patents for intellectual property protection. Patent use varies both by how big the plant is and whether it is innovative or non-innovative. In addition, the use of patents by Canadian manufacturing plants varies by the subsector in which they are classified.

    Release date: 2008-05-22
Data (4)

Data (4) ((4 results))

  • Table: 26-202-X
    Description:

    This publication presents early estimates of mineral production by class and by province, quantities and values.

    Release date: 2008-12-19

  • Table: 26-201-X
    Description:

    The review presents detailed and recent statistics of the mining industry, including the production and the value of minerals by kind and by province. It also presents historical tables of values by main groups, the average prices of leading minerals and principal statistics by main group and by province, and diamond drilling of deposits other than fuels. It includes explanatory notes and a bibliography.

    Release date: 2008-10-23

  • 3. Metal Ore Mining Archived
    Table: 26-223-X
    Description:

    This annual publication presents data on establishments, employment, payroll, materials, supplies and contract services. It also shows the production, shipments and drillings completed. It includes lists of establishments showing employment size ranges, terms and definitions and a bibliography.

    Release date: 2008-10-16

  • Table: 26-226-X
    Description:

    This publication presents data on establishments, employment, payroll, material and supplies used, fuel and electricity, as well as on production and shipments. Data are presented by province. It includes a list of establishments, definitions and a bibliography.

    This publication covers NAICS 2123: Stone Mining and Quarrying; Sand, Gravel, Clay, and Ceramic and Refractory Minerals Mining and Quarrying; Other Non-Metallic Mineral Mining and Quarrying.

    Release date: 2008-10-10
Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (10 to 20 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008070
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study reviews status and trends for the manufacturing sector in 2007. It analyses major regional and industry shifts in production and put them in the context of major socio-economic drivers such as domestic demand and exports. Employment, productivity and profitability indicators are also presented.

    Release date: 2008-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800310537
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A study of which industries are most reliant on exports for their output, and which import the most inputs.

    Release date: 2008-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity and wages tend to be higher in cities. This is typically explained by agglomeration economies, which increase the returns associated with urban locations. Competing arguments of specialization and diversity undergird these claims. Empirical research has long sought to confirm the existence of agglomeration economies and to adjudicate between the models of Marshall, Arrow and Romer (MAR) that suggest the benefits of proximity are largely confined to individual industries, and the claims of Jacobs (1969) that such benefits derive from a general increase in the density of economic activity in a particular place and are shared by all occupants of that location. The primary goal of this paper is to identify the main sources of urban increasing returns, after Marshall (1920). A secondary goal is to examine the geographical distance across which externalities flow between businesses in the same industry. We bring to bear on these questions plant-level data organized in the form of a panel across the years 1989 and 1999. The panel data overcome selection bias resulting from unobserved plant-level heterogeneity that is constant over time. Plant-level production functions are estimated across the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole and for five broad industry groups, each characterized by the nature of their output. Results provide strong support for Marshall's (1920) claims about the importance of buyer-supplier networks, labour market pooling and spillovers. The data show spillovers enhance plant productivity within industries rather than between them and that these spillovers tend to be more spatially extensive than previous studies have found.

    Release date: 2008-02-05
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