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All (24)

All (24) (0 to 10 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004022
    Description:

    This working paper examines whether the innovative characteristics of small manufacturing firms that show high growth are significantly different from those of other types of small manufacturing firms. Two groups of small firms are analysed: those with 20 to 49 employees and those with 50 to 99 employees in 1997.

    The data analysed in this paper are from the Survey of Innovation 1999, which surveyed manufacturing provincial enterprises with at least 20 employees and at least $250,000 in revenues. Data from the Survey of Innovation 1999 has been linked to the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1997 and 1999, and the growth of firms was determined based on this data. Eight different indicators of the innovative characteristics of small firms are presented.

    Release date: 2004-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007450
    Description:

    The manufacturing sector is a vital part of the Canadian economy. In 2002, it accounted for $165 billion of Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) and more than two million jobs. Unlike the other G7 countries, the contribution of the manufacturing sector to the Canadian economy has been increasing.

    From 1997 to 2002, average labour productivity growth in the manufacturing was slightly lower than the average for all industries. Part of this could be explained by the relatively low capital investment in the sector.

    In 2001, the R&D expenditure by the manufacturing sector represented 70 percent of all industrial R&D expenditures. The R&D intensity for the sector is about four times greater than that of all industries in Canada.

    The manufacturing sector has driven much of Canada's trade. In 2002, manufacturing exports accounted for 64 percent of Canada's total exports of goods and services. The sector became much more export dependent but Canada's overall manufacturing trade balance was negative. Nevertheless, Canada's manufacturing sector has been a success story.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037434
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This new study on innovation and growth examines the determinants of innovation and confirms that innovation is a main factor contributing to labour productivity growth, gains in market share and survival in Canadian manufacturing plants.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037435
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study looks at growth in labour productivity in manufacturing companies that increased their use of advanced technology during the mid-1990s.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037436
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examined the difference in adoption rates between firms that reported high employment growth and firms that did not.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037437
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This analysis gives some insights into how small firms that have made the transition to medium size are different from the rest of the pack in innovativeness, patent use, confidentiality agreements, and research and development tax credits collaboration. It is based on the 1999 Survey of Innovation.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037439
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article provides an overview of research and development expenditures by the two countries' manufacturing sectors and then examines the data by industry to measure the relative research and development intensity of Canada's manufacturing industries compared with those of the United States.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040107420
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents measures of the extent of renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker. Renewal occurs when old plants are supplanted by new plants or when some plants decline and others grow. In both cases, resources used in production are being shifted from less productive to more productive plants.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2004008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper measures the extent of economic renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, 1961 to 1999, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004023
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper measures the degree of job renewal in Canadian manufacturing as a whole and across provinces. This study uses a longitudinal microdata set that covers the population of manufacturing plants in Canada from 1973 to 1996.

    Release date: 2004-10-21
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 25-002-X
    Description:

    This publication provides information on the number of units and the value of domestic and export shipments for each quarter from manufacturers of specified heating products. These products include: solid fuel heating stoves, fireplaces, furnaces, boilers, etc.

    Release date: 2004-08-23

  • Table: 44-004-X
    Description:

    The publication presents information on production and shipment of mineral wool by type from manufacturers of mineral wool and fibreglass insulation. Industrial or commercial type wool insulation is not included. Geographic detail is at the national level. The December issue includes a list of reporting firms.

    Release date: 2004-07-28

  • Table: 33-002-X
    Description:

    This publication provides semi-annual data on the production of footwear in Canada. Current semester and year-to-date data are published for dress and casual footwear, work and utility-type footwear, waterproof footwear, slippers, sports footwear and other types of footwear. Comparable data for the preceding year are also shown. The December issue includes a list of reporting firms.

    Release date: 2004-02-13
Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004022
    Description:

    This working paper examines whether the innovative characteristics of small manufacturing firms that show high growth are significantly different from those of other types of small manufacturing firms. Two groups of small firms are analysed: those with 20 to 49 employees and those with 50 to 99 employees in 1997.

    The data analysed in this paper are from the Survey of Innovation 1999, which surveyed manufacturing provincial enterprises with at least 20 employees and at least $250,000 in revenues. Data from the Survey of Innovation 1999 has been linked to the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1997 and 1999, and the growth of firms was determined based on this data. Eight different indicators of the innovative characteristics of small firms are presented.

    Release date: 2004-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007450
    Description:

    The manufacturing sector is a vital part of the Canadian economy. In 2002, it accounted for $165 billion of Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) and more than two million jobs. Unlike the other G7 countries, the contribution of the manufacturing sector to the Canadian economy has been increasing.

    From 1997 to 2002, average labour productivity growth in the manufacturing was slightly lower than the average for all industries. Part of this could be explained by the relatively low capital investment in the sector.

    In 2001, the R&D expenditure by the manufacturing sector represented 70 percent of all industrial R&D expenditures. The R&D intensity for the sector is about four times greater than that of all industries in Canada.

    The manufacturing sector has driven much of Canada's trade. In 2002, manufacturing exports accounted for 64 percent of Canada's total exports of goods and services. The sector became much more export dependent but Canada's overall manufacturing trade balance was negative. Nevertheless, Canada's manufacturing sector has been a success story.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037434
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This new study on innovation and growth examines the determinants of innovation and confirms that innovation is a main factor contributing to labour productivity growth, gains in market share and survival in Canadian manufacturing plants.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037435
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study looks at growth in labour productivity in manufacturing companies that increased their use of advanced technology during the mid-1990s.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037436
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examined the difference in adoption rates between firms that reported high employment growth and firms that did not.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037437
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This analysis gives some insights into how small firms that have made the transition to medium size are different from the rest of the pack in innovativeness, patent use, confidentiality agreements, and research and development tax credits collaboration. It is based on the 1999 Survey of Innovation.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037439
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article provides an overview of research and development expenditures by the two countries' manufacturing sectors and then examines the data by industry to measure the relative research and development intensity of Canada's manufacturing industries compared with those of the United States.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040107420
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents measures of the extent of renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker. Renewal occurs when old plants are supplanted by new plants or when some plants decline and others grow. In both cases, resources used in production are being shifted from less productive to more productive plants.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2004008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper measures the extent of economic renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, 1961 to 1999, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004023
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper measures the degree of job renewal in Canadian manufacturing as a whole and across provinces. This study uses a longitudinal microdata set that covers the population of manufacturing plants in Canada from 1973 to 1996.

    Release date: 2004-10-21
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 31-533-X
    Description:

    Starting with the August 2004 reference month, the Monthly Survey of Manufacturing (MSM) is using administrative data (Goods and Services Tax files) to derive shipments for a portion of the small establishments in the sample. This document is being published to complement the release of MSM data for that month.

    Release date: 2004-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004009
    Description:

    This activity considers some of the new produce we are seeing in Canadian grocery stores. It looks at the origins of these vegetables, and how they made it to the produce aisle.

    Release date: 2004-08-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 57-505-X
    Description:

    This reference document provides a basis for the Estimates for the Industrial Consumption of Energy (ICE) on the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) basis for the 1990 reference year. The 1990 ICE is a pivotal year for climate change benchmarks with the signing of the Kyoto Protocol. The 1990 and the 1995-2000 period inclusively provide ICE estimates on the new NAICS which permits users to compare and analyze more recent trends and events with common classification structures.

    Release date: 2004-04-16
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