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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000123
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent studies have demonstrated the quantitative importance of entry, exit, growth and decline in the industrial population. It is this turnover that rewards innovative activity and contributes to productivity growth.

    While the size of the entry population is impressive - especially when cumulated over time - the importance of entry is ultimately due to its impact on innovation in the economy. Experimentation is important in a dynamic, market-based economy. A key part of the experimentation comes from entrants. New entrepreneurs constantly offer consumers new products both in terms of the basic good and the level of service that accompanies it.

    This experimentation is associated with significant costs since many entrants fail. Young firms are most at risk of failure; data drawn from a longitudinal file of Canadian entrants in both the goods and service sectors show that over half the new firms that fail do so in the first two years of life. Life is short for the majority of entrants. Only 1 in 5 new firms survive to their tenth birthday.

    Since so many entrants fall by the wayside, it is of inherent interest to understand the conditions that are associated with success, the conditions that allow the potential in new entrepreneurs to come to fruition. The success of an entrant is due to its choosing the correct combination of strategies and activities. To understand how these capabilities contribute to growth, it is necessary to study how the performance of entrants relates to differences in strategies and pursued activities.

    This paper describes the environment and the characteristics of entrants that manage to survive and grow. In doing so, it focuses on two issues. The first is the innovativeness of entrants and the extent to which their growth depends on their innovativeness. The second is to outline how the stress on worker skills, which is partially related to training, complements innovation and contributes to growth.

    Release date: 2000-12-08

  • 2. Logging Industry Archived
    Table: 25-201-X
    Description:

    The publication provides principal statistics of the logging industry including number of establishments, number of employees, salaries and wages, cost of fuel and electricity, cost of materials, value of shipments and value added. It also presents commodity detail by province on inputs and outputs and estimates of total forest production, by products and by province. A data analysis, definitions and notes, a bibliography and a list of establishments by province are also included.

    Release date: 2000-10-06

  • Table: 35-251-X
    Description:

    Data on furniture and fixture industries clearly show the tremendous expansion period affecting these industries. Several establishments have taken advantage of the favourable economic conditions and the openness of North American markets to increase their deliveries to the United States. Foreign markets have been the driving force behind the furniture and fixture industries' growth in the past decade, since large establishments generally have more resources to break into these markets.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 41-251-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Fabricated metal products industries remain in the middle of an expansion period. The construction sector's vitality, as well as the high North-American demand for industrial products, allow metal products manufacturers to live glorious days. However, where competitiveness is concerned, there could be trouble in paradise. In the last few years, the cost of labour has been on the rise, while the value added for each paid hour has been weakening. Moreover, imports have been increasing at a higher pace than exports in the last two years.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 31-532-G
    Description:

    This practical and informative guide for manufacturers and exporters will assist in navigating through numerous Statistics Canada products and services. In addition, some recent articles and research papers have been highlighted.

    Release date: 2000-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000151
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether new views of the multinational that see these firms as decentralizing research and development (R&D) activities abroad to exploit local competencies accord with the activities of multinationals in Canada. The paper describes the innovation regime of multinational firms in Canada by examining the differences between foreign- and domestically owned firms. It focuses on the extent to which R&D is used; the type of R&D activity; the importance of R&D relative to other sources of innovative ideas; whether the use of these other ideas indicates that multinationals are closely tied into local innovation networks; the intensity of innovation; and the use that is made of intellectual property rights to protect innovations from being copied by others.

    We find that, far from being passively dependent on R&D from their parents, foreign-owned firms in Canada are more active in R&D than the population of Canadian-owned firms. They are also more often involved in R&D collaboration projects both abroad and in Canada. As expected, foreign subsidiaries enjoy the advantage of accessing technology from their parent and sister companies. While multinationals are more closely tied into a network of related firms for innovative ideas than are domestically owned firms, their local R&D unit is a more important source of information for innovation than are these inter-firm links. Surprisingly, foreign subsidiaries also more frequently report that they are using technology from unrelated firms. Moreover, the multinational is just as likely to develop links into a local university and other local innovation consortia as are domestically owned firms. This evidence indicates that multinationals in Canada are not, on the whole, operating subsidiaries whose scientific development capabilities are truncated - at least not in comparison to domestically owned firms.

    A comparison of the extent and impact of innovation activity of domestically and foreign-owned firms shows that foreign-owned firms innovate in all sectors more frequently than Canadian-owned companies in almost all size categories. They are also more likely to introduce world-first rather than more imitative innovations. Their superiority is most pronounced in the consumer goods sector. Finally, foreign-owned firms are more likely to protect their innovations with patent protection.

    The paper also compares foreign subsidiaries to Canadian corporations that have an international orientation. These additional comparisons show that the two groups of multinationals are quite similar, both with regards to the likelihood that they conduct some form of R&D and that they introduce innovations. These results indicate that it is as much the degree of globalization that the nationality of ownership that affects the degree of innovativeness.

    Overall, the survey results suggest that foreign-owned firms make a significant contribution to technological progress and innovation in Canadian industry.

    Release date: 2000-06-27

  • Thematic map: 31F0028X
    Description:

    There is a diversity of manufacturing activity that contributes to Canada's regional economies. The spatial distribution of these activities is far from symmetrical, with most activity being concentrated within the Québec City - Windsor corridor. In 1997, the provinces of Ontario and Québec accounted for approximately 76% of Canada's value of shipments. Using data from the Annual Survey of Manufactures, two maps have been created to highlight the predominant manufacturing activity by census division in 1983 and 1997. Employing advanced mapping software, it is possible to accurately make maps which show the correspondence between manufacturing activity and the ecumene. The brief discussion herein will help readers to interpret the enclosed maps.

    Release date: 2000-05-10

  • Thematic map: 31F0029X
    Description:

    The Manufacturing, Construction and Energy Division is engaged in finding alternatives to presenting data from the Annual Survey of Manufactures using advanced mapping technology. This technology enables us to present a coherent spatial representation of manufacturing activity across Canada. The interactive map presents provincial principle statistics and highlights, with a view to disseminating knowledge and stimulating discussion.

    Release date: 2000-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000139
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper estimates price-marginal cost mark-ups for Canadian manufacturing industries in order to assess the impact of import competition on domestic market power. The results are mixed. Although the overall relationship between mark-ups and imports is positive across industries for the early 1970s and insignificant for the late 1970s, there is some weak cross-sectional evidence to suggest that imports reduce market power in domestically concentrated industries. Changes in imports between the two periods, however, have a positive impact on mark-ups in concentrated industries. Thus, there is no consistent evidence for Canada that imports have had the beneficial impact on competition that has been emphasized in much of the literature. In contrast, an interesting result of the paper is that increases in exports are associated with reductions in mark-ups, suggesting that exports may have a stronger pro-competitive impact on domestic firms than imports.

    Release date: 2000-05-04

  • Journals and periodicals: 41-250-X
    Description:

    Data from the Annual Survey of manufactures (ASM) is the prime source for this publication. The results of the 1997 survey are supplemented by data from sub-annual Statistics Canada surveys and major economic indicators.

    Release date: 2000-04-27
Data (6)

Data (6) ((6 results))

  • 1. Logging Industry Archived
    Table: 25-201-X
    Description:

    The publication provides principal statistics of the logging industry including number of establishments, number of employees, salaries and wages, cost of fuel and electricity, cost of materials, value of shipments and value added. It also presents commodity detail by province on inputs and outputs and estimates of total forest production, by products and by province. A data analysis, definitions and notes, a bibliography and a list of establishments by province are also included.

    Release date: 2000-10-06

  • Table: 35-251-X
    Description:

    Data on furniture and fixture industries clearly show the tremendous expansion period affecting these industries. Several establishments have taken advantage of the favourable economic conditions and the openness of North American markets to increase their deliveries to the United States. Foreign markets have been the driving force behind the furniture and fixture industries' growth in the past decade, since large establishments generally have more resources to break into these markets.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Thematic map: 31F0028X
    Description:

    There is a diversity of manufacturing activity that contributes to Canada's regional economies. The spatial distribution of these activities is far from symmetrical, with most activity being concentrated within the Québec City - Windsor corridor. In 1997, the provinces of Ontario and Québec accounted for approximately 76% of Canada's value of shipments. Using data from the Annual Survey of Manufactures, two maps have been created to highlight the predominant manufacturing activity by census division in 1983 and 1997. Employing advanced mapping software, it is possible to accurately make maps which show the correspondence between manufacturing activity and the ecumene. The brief discussion herein will help readers to interpret the enclosed maps.

    Release date: 2000-05-10

  • Thematic map: 31F0029X
    Description:

    The Manufacturing, Construction and Energy Division is engaged in finding alternatives to presenting data from the Annual Survey of Manufactures using advanced mapping technology. This technology enables us to present a coherent spatial representation of manufacturing activity across Canada. The interactive map presents provincial principle statistics and highlights, with a view to disseminating knowledge and stimulating discussion.

    Release date: 2000-05-04

  • 5. Food Industries Archived
    Table: 32-250-X
    Description:

    The most recent issue contains "Food producers maintain expansion" by Peter Zylstra. Food commodity processors are engaged in a multitude of manufacturing activities. The aggregate performance of these is the subject of this article. Common influences on all processing industries that make up the Food Industries Major Group are examined, while specific ones that impact some and not others are also discussed. Growth in food industries has always been a function of population growth. In addition, health considerations and new product development are important factors. The summary of recent developments is based on results of the 1997 Annual Survey of Manufactures. Other sources are also used for industry analysis as well as for the provision of industry environment and economic background.

    Release date: 2000-03-13

  • Table: 31-212-X
    Description:

    This publication shows expenditures, by industry, for the various types of packaging materials.

    Release date: 2000-03-03
Analysis (21)

Analysis (21) (0 to 10 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000123
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent studies have demonstrated the quantitative importance of entry, exit, growth and decline in the industrial population. It is this turnover that rewards innovative activity and contributes to productivity growth.

    While the size of the entry population is impressive - especially when cumulated over time - the importance of entry is ultimately due to its impact on innovation in the economy. Experimentation is important in a dynamic, market-based economy. A key part of the experimentation comes from entrants. New entrepreneurs constantly offer consumers new products both in terms of the basic good and the level of service that accompanies it.

    This experimentation is associated with significant costs since many entrants fail. Young firms are most at risk of failure; data drawn from a longitudinal file of Canadian entrants in both the goods and service sectors show that over half the new firms that fail do so in the first two years of life. Life is short for the majority of entrants. Only 1 in 5 new firms survive to their tenth birthday.

    Since so many entrants fall by the wayside, it is of inherent interest to understand the conditions that are associated with success, the conditions that allow the potential in new entrepreneurs to come to fruition. The success of an entrant is due to its choosing the correct combination of strategies and activities. To understand how these capabilities contribute to growth, it is necessary to study how the performance of entrants relates to differences in strategies and pursued activities.

    This paper describes the environment and the characteristics of entrants that manage to survive and grow. In doing so, it focuses on two issues. The first is the innovativeness of entrants and the extent to which their growth depends on their innovativeness. The second is to outline how the stress on worker skills, which is partially related to training, complements innovation and contributes to growth.

    Release date: 2000-12-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 41-251-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Fabricated metal products industries remain in the middle of an expansion period. The construction sector's vitality, as well as the high North-American demand for industrial products, allow metal products manufacturers to live glorious days. However, where competitiveness is concerned, there could be trouble in paradise. In the last few years, the cost of labour has been on the rise, while the value added for each paid hour has been weakening. Moreover, imports have been increasing at a higher pace than exports in the last two years.

    Release date: 2000-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000151
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether new views of the multinational that see these firms as decentralizing research and development (R&D) activities abroad to exploit local competencies accord with the activities of multinationals in Canada. The paper describes the innovation regime of multinational firms in Canada by examining the differences between foreign- and domestically owned firms. It focuses on the extent to which R&D is used; the type of R&D activity; the importance of R&D relative to other sources of innovative ideas; whether the use of these other ideas indicates that multinationals are closely tied into local innovation networks; the intensity of innovation; and the use that is made of intellectual property rights to protect innovations from being copied by others.

    We find that, far from being passively dependent on R&D from their parents, foreign-owned firms in Canada are more active in R&D than the population of Canadian-owned firms. They are also more often involved in R&D collaboration projects both abroad and in Canada. As expected, foreign subsidiaries enjoy the advantage of accessing technology from their parent and sister companies. While multinationals are more closely tied into a network of related firms for innovative ideas than are domestically owned firms, their local R&D unit is a more important source of information for innovation than are these inter-firm links. Surprisingly, foreign subsidiaries also more frequently report that they are using technology from unrelated firms. Moreover, the multinational is just as likely to develop links into a local university and other local innovation consortia as are domestically owned firms. This evidence indicates that multinationals in Canada are not, on the whole, operating subsidiaries whose scientific development capabilities are truncated - at least not in comparison to domestically owned firms.

    A comparison of the extent and impact of innovation activity of domestically and foreign-owned firms shows that foreign-owned firms innovate in all sectors more frequently than Canadian-owned companies in almost all size categories. They are also more likely to introduce world-first rather than more imitative innovations. Their superiority is most pronounced in the consumer goods sector. Finally, foreign-owned firms are more likely to protect their innovations with patent protection.

    The paper also compares foreign subsidiaries to Canadian corporations that have an international orientation. These additional comparisons show that the two groups of multinationals are quite similar, both with regards to the likelihood that they conduct some form of R&D and that they introduce innovations. These results indicate that it is as much the degree of globalization that the nationality of ownership that affects the degree of innovativeness.

    Overall, the survey results suggest that foreign-owned firms make a significant contribution to technological progress and innovation in Canadian industry.

    Release date: 2000-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000139
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper estimates price-marginal cost mark-ups for Canadian manufacturing industries in order to assess the impact of import competition on domestic market power. The results are mixed. Although the overall relationship between mark-ups and imports is positive across industries for the early 1970s and insignificant for the late 1970s, there is some weak cross-sectional evidence to suggest that imports reduce market power in domestically concentrated industries. Changes in imports between the two periods, however, have a positive impact on mark-ups in concentrated industries. Thus, there is no consistent evidence for Canada that imports have had the beneficial impact on competition that has been emphasized in much of the literature. In contrast, an interesting result of the paper is that increases in exports are associated with reductions in mark-ups, suggesting that exports may have a stronger pro-competitive impact on domestic firms than imports.

    Release date: 2000-05-04

  • Journals and periodicals: 41-250-X
    Description:

    Data from the Annual Survey of manufactures (ASM) is the prime source for this publication. The results of the 1997 survey are supplemented by data from sub-annual Statistics Canada surveys and major economic indicators.

    Release date: 2000-04-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 34-251-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Performance of the textile products industries. by Yasmin Sheikh. The business climate under which the manufacturing sector has been operating has evolved particularly in the last decade. Within manufacturing, certain industries have responded better than others to the challenge brought about by advancement in technology and increased globalization. Textile products was the fastest growing industry in terms of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) from 1961 to 1987 compared to the overall economy, the manufacturing sector and closely related Primary Textile Industries. However, this industry's GDP declined sharply between 1988 and 1992. Except for 1996, the industry again experienced growth from 1993 onwards but its GDP growth index is well below its peak in 1987.

    Results of the Annual Survey of Manufacturers show that manufacturing shipments of textile products in constant 1992 dollars peaked in 1988 and have since declined. This paper reviews data from this survey for the period 1988 to 1997 to underline the changes in the size, structure and performance of this industry and how it has fared in comparison to the Primary Textiles Industry. It also highlights current developments using results of the Monthly Survey of Manufacturers.

    Release date: 2000-04-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 45-250-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Refined petroleum and coal products industries" by Randall Sheldrick. The Canadian economy has been on the rise for almost a decade. But, the economy suffered a modest set back in 1998 due to the effects of the Asian economic and financial market crisis. While most manufacturing industries continued to expand, resource-based industries such as refined petroleum were hard hit by a slump in commodity prices.

    This document presents an overview of the Refined Petroleum Products Industry. Most of the findings are based on the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM). According to this survey the total value of shipments for the industry stalled at just over $21 billion in 1997. Despite the fact that the industry tends to be cyclical in nature, demand for refined petroleum products is expected to increase steadily into the next century.

    Release date: 2000-04-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 32-251-X
    Description:

    The most recent issue contains the article "The beverage industries: two markets" by Peter Zylstra.This paper presents recent developments in the Beverage Industries. Following a brief introduction, the industry is analysed in terms of the four component sub-industries, which fall into two groups: soft drinks and alcoholic beverages. The two groups constitute different overall markets. The summary of recent developments is based on results of the 1997 Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM). Other sources are used to provide industry environment and economic backgroun.

    Release date: 2000-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 25F0002M2000001
    Description:

    This article describes the changes to the logging industry and the demand for lumber, paper pulp and newsprint in 1997 and 1998, as well as more recent events.

    Release date: 2000-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 31F0027M2000001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines current expenditures on packaging products by manufacturing industries and outlines various trends observed since the start of the decade.

    Release date: 2000-03-29
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 31-532-G
    Description:

    This practical and informative guide for manufacturers and exporters will assist in navigating through numerous Statistics Canada products and services. In addition, some recent articles and research papers have been highlighted.

    Release date: 2000-07-26
Date modified: