Keyword search

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (28)

All (28) (0 to 10 of 28 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-518-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The food-processing industry benefits from a wide a range of new advanced technologies. Technological advances include computer-based information and control systems, as well as sophisticated processing and packaging methods that enhance product quality, improve food safety and reduce costs. Continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are examples of related business practices.

    This study examines the use of advanced technologies in the food-processing industry. It focuses not just on the incidence and intensity of use of these new technologies but also on the way technology relates to overall firm strategy. It also examines how technology use is affected by selected industry structural characteristics and how the adoption of technologies affects the performance of firms. It considers as well how the environment influences technological change. The nature and structure of the industry are shown to condition the competitive environment, the business strategies that are pursued, product characteristics and the role of technology.

    Firms make strategic choices in light of technological opportunities and the risks and opportunities provided by their competitive environments. They implement strategies through appropriate business practices and activities, including the development of core competencies in the areas of marketing, production and human resources, as well as technology. Firms that differ in size and nationality choose to pursue different technological strategies. This study focuses on how these differences are reflected in the different use of technology for large and small establishments, for foreign and domestic plants and for plants in different industries.

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999105
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the growth in advanced technology use that has taken place over the last decade in Canadian manufacturing establishments. It presents the percentage of plants that use any one of the advanced technologies studied and how this has changed between 1989 and 1998. It also investigates how growth rates in the 1990s have varied across different technologies in specific functional areas, such as design and engineering, fabrication, communications, and integration and control. In an attempt to discover how changes in technology use are related to certain plant characteristics, the paper then investigates whether the growth in technology use varies across plants that differ by size, nationality and industry. Multivariate analysis is used to investigate the joint effects of plant size, foreign ownership and industry on the incidence of technology adoption and how these effects have changed over the last decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 34-252-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Has the Clothing Industry adapted to the changing economic environment?" by Yasmin Sheik. The clothing industry consists of establishments engaged in the production of men's, boys', women's, and children's wear as well as furs, foundation garments, hosiery, gloves, sweaters and occupational clothing.

    The clothing industry is labour intensive and requires only a limited number of special skills, and therefore it exists in almost every country in the world. In the past, developed countries, including Canada, restricted competition in this sector from low-wage developing countries by the imposition of country-specific import quotas. However, a change in trade policies has resulted in the reduction of trade barriers and increased competition. The Canadian Clothing and Textile industries now fall under the normal trading rules of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and World Trade Organization (WTO) besides being part of the North American rationalization process under the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with the U.S. and Mexico.

    Using data from the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1988 to 1997, this paper will show how the Canadian Clothing Industry has adapted to the changing economic environment. It will also comment on the recent period of growth using the Monthly Survey of Manufacturing and other indicators.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 36-250-X
    Description:

    The most recent issue contains "An update on the paper and allied products industry" by Gilles Simard. After a prosperous 1994 and 1995, and the brutal fall in 1996, the Paper and Allied Products Industry experienced a less turbulent period during the last three years. Prices have been relatively stable reflecting the slack demand for goods produced by this industry. The Asian crisis afflicted the West coast wood pulp producers while the demand for newsprint in the United States helped maintain activities in the East. This article, based on the results of the 1997 Annual Survey of Manufactures, briefly describes changes to the industry in 1997 and 1998, and looks at recent events in 1999.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 36-251-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Printing, publishing and allied industries: an overview" by Sharon Boyer. This paper provides highlights and an overview of the economic activity and contribution of the Publishing, Printing and Allied Industries Major Group 28, to the manufacturing sector and to the Canadian economy as a whole. The impact of international trade will also be examined.

    Based on the results from the 1997 Annual Survey of Manufactures, but using information from other more current Statistics Canada sources, this article includes data from 1999.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 42-251-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "The transportation equipment industries in Canada, 1985 - 1997 - A review of change". The transportation equipment industries are the largest industrial manufacturing group in Canada representing more than a quarter of the total value of manufacturing shipments in 1997. They include the manufacturing of a diverse range of products, ranging from aircraft to ships to automobile assembly to vehicle parts and accessories manufacturing. As well, the manufacturing activity also includes repairs to aircrafts, boats and ships.

    Since 1985 these industries have experienced sustained growth in terms of total shipments as well as the number of workers employed. The hourly wages paid to workers are much higher than the average hourly wages for all manufacturing. The gap between the hourly wages of the workers in the automotive industry and the rest of the workers in the transportation equipment industry has been widening considerably since 1985.

    The auto industry has weathered free trade with the United States without suffering the job losses or decreasing productivity that some analysts predicted before the agreement took effect. In fact, productivity has increased, as have incomes.

    Over 70% of the output was exported, mostly to the United States. Given the sustained prosperity that the United States has enjoyed for more than a decade now, it is not surprising that the Canadian transportation equipment industries have also performed well.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 46-250-X
    Description:

    The chemical and chemical products industry is one of the key manufacturing industries in Canada. In 1996, despite an increase in exports and in prices, the growth this industry has known since the beginning of the decade slowed down. This leading-edge industry employs a scientific labour force, which is not always associated with manufacturing.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999101
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors contributing to innovative activity in the Canadian food processing sector. The study first focuses on the importance of research and development activity and advanced business practices used by production and engineering departments. Second, it examines the extent to which larger firm size and less competition serve to stimulate competition-the so-called Schumpeterian hypothesis. Third, the effect of the nationality of a firm on innovation is investigated. Finally, industry effects are examined.

    The paper finds that business practices are significantly related to the probability that a firm is innovative. This is also the case for R&D. Size effects are significant, particularly for process innovations. Elsewhere, their effect is greatly diminished once business practices are included. Foreign ownership is significant only for process innovations and not for product innovations. Competition matters, more so for product than for process innovations. Establishments in the 'other' food products industry tend to lead when it comes to innovation, whereas fish product plants tend to lag.

    Release date: 1999-11-25

  • Table: 32-013-X
    Description:

    This monthly publication presents data by weight on the acquisition, stock, production and shipment of raw and refined sugar for the month and the year-to-date from refiners of raw cane or beet sugars as well as those who further process such sugars. Geographic detail is at the national level. The December issue includes a list of reporting firms.

    Release date: 1999-11-03

  • 10. Non-metal Mines Archived
    Table: 26-224-X
    Description:

    The publication presents data on establishments, employment, payroll, materials and supplies used; production and shipments; drilling completed and tonnage of ore removed. It also includes a list of establishments, notes and definitions and a bibliography.

    Release date: 1999-10-13
Data (6)

Data (6) ((6 results))

  • Table: 32-013-X
    Description:

    This monthly publication presents data by weight on the acquisition, stock, production and shipment of raw and refined sugar for the month and the year-to-date from refiners of raw cane or beet sugars as well as those who further process such sugars. Geographic detail is at the national level. The December issue includes a list of reporting firms.

    Release date: 1999-11-03

  • 2. Non-metal Mines Archived
    Table: 26-224-X
    Description:

    The publication presents data on establishments, employment, payroll, materials and supplies used; production and shipments; drilling completed and tonnage of ore removed. It also includes a list of establishments, notes and definitions and a bibliography.

    Release date: 1999-10-13

  • Table: 26-225-X
    Description:

    The publication presents data on establishments, employment, payroll, material, supplies, fuel and electricity used, product shipments and consumption. Data are presented by province. It includes a list of establishments, definitions and a bibliography.

    Release date: 1999-10-13

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111308
    Description:

    This section is concerned with those statistics referring to the allocation of lands and the production of forests. To some extent, these two questions are compatible only in that they have fallen under the same administrative unit for the purposes of management and data collection. They continue together in this volume as a matter of convenience. The data relating to land refer to the allocation of lands for settlement, production and recreation, and are, wherever possible, reported at both the national and provincial level. Those data relating to forests are concerned with primary products, the manufacturing of lumber, pulp and paper, and exports. Sources, together with problems or qualifications associated with them, are identified in each table by footnotes.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111311
    Description:

    This section includes production, exports and imports of metallic and non-metallic minerals, the latter category including structural materials but excluding fuels, which are reported in the Energy chapter, Section Q. The section contains three parts: metallic minerals, series P1-81; non-metallic minerals, series P82-150; and principal statistics, series P151-162. The first two parts contain quantities and value of production, exports and imports; the third part contains number of employees, salaries and wages, cost of fuel and electricity, cost of process supplies and containers, gross value of production and net value added by processing.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111314
    Description:

    This section updates the official statistics on manufactures for 1870 to 1959 presented in the first edition of Historical Statistics of Canada. Apart from minor revision to some series for the years 1952 to 1959, no revisions have been made to the statistics from 1870 to 1959. The descriptions of the statistics for this period have been reproduced without change from the description in the first edition written by Arthur J.R. Smith.

    Release date: 1999-07-29
Analysis (22)

Analysis (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-518-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The food-processing industry benefits from a wide a range of new advanced technologies. Technological advances include computer-based information and control systems, as well as sophisticated processing and packaging methods that enhance product quality, improve food safety and reduce costs. Continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are examples of related business practices.

    This study examines the use of advanced technologies in the food-processing industry. It focuses not just on the incidence and intensity of use of these new technologies but also on the way technology relates to overall firm strategy. It also examines how technology use is affected by selected industry structural characteristics and how the adoption of technologies affects the performance of firms. It considers as well how the environment influences technological change. The nature and structure of the industry are shown to condition the competitive environment, the business strategies that are pursued, product characteristics and the role of technology.

    Firms make strategic choices in light of technological opportunities and the risks and opportunities provided by their competitive environments. They implement strategies through appropriate business practices and activities, including the development of core competencies in the areas of marketing, production and human resources, as well as technology. Firms that differ in size and nationality choose to pursue different technological strategies. This study focuses on how these differences are reflected in the different use of technology for large and small establishments, for foreign and domestic plants and for plants in different industries.

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999105
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the growth in advanced technology use that has taken place over the last decade in Canadian manufacturing establishments. It presents the percentage of plants that use any one of the advanced technologies studied and how this has changed between 1989 and 1998. It also investigates how growth rates in the 1990s have varied across different technologies in specific functional areas, such as design and engineering, fabrication, communications, and integration and control. In an attempt to discover how changes in technology use are related to certain plant characteristics, the paper then investigates whether the growth in technology use varies across plants that differ by size, nationality and industry. Multivariate analysis is used to investigate the joint effects of plant size, foreign ownership and industry on the incidence of technology adoption and how these effects have changed over the last decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 34-252-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Has the Clothing Industry adapted to the changing economic environment?" by Yasmin Sheik. The clothing industry consists of establishments engaged in the production of men's, boys', women's, and children's wear as well as furs, foundation garments, hosiery, gloves, sweaters and occupational clothing.

    The clothing industry is labour intensive and requires only a limited number of special skills, and therefore it exists in almost every country in the world. In the past, developed countries, including Canada, restricted competition in this sector from low-wage developing countries by the imposition of country-specific import quotas. However, a change in trade policies has resulted in the reduction of trade barriers and increased competition. The Canadian Clothing and Textile industries now fall under the normal trading rules of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and World Trade Organization (WTO) besides being part of the North American rationalization process under the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with the U.S. and Mexico.

    Using data from the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1988 to 1997, this paper will show how the Canadian Clothing Industry has adapted to the changing economic environment. It will also comment on the recent period of growth using the Monthly Survey of Manufacturing and other indicators.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 36-250-X
    Description:

    The most recent issue contains "An update on the paper and allied products industry" by Gilles Simard. After a prosperous 1994 and 1995, and the brutal fall in 1996, the Paper and Allied Products Industry experienced a less turbulent period during the last three years. Prices have been relatively stable reflecting the slack demand for goods produced by this industry. The Asian crisis afflicted the West coast wood pulp producers while the demand for newsprint in the United States helped maintain activities in the East. This article, based on the results of the 1997 Annual Survey of Manufactures, briefly describes changes to the industry in 1997 and 1998, and looks at recent events in 1999.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 36-251-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Printing, publishing and allied industries: an overview" by Sharon Boyer. This paper provides highlights and an overview of the economic activity and contribution of the Publishing, Printing and Allied Industries Major Group 28, to the manufacturing sector and to the Canadian economy as a whole. The impact of international trade will also be examined.

    Based on the results from the 1997 Annual Survey of Manufactures, but using information from other more current Statistics Canada sources, this article includes data from 1999.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 42-251-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "The transportation equipment industries in Canada, 1985 - 1997 - A review of change". The transportation equipment industries are the largest industrial manufacturing group in Canada representing more than a quarter of the total value of manufacturing shipments in 1997. They include the manufacturing of a diverse range of products, ranging from aircraft to ships to automobile assembly to vehicle parts and accessories manufacturing. As well, the manufacturing activity also includes repairs to aircrafts, boats and ships.

    Since 1985 these industries have experienced sustained growth in terms of total shipments as well as the number of workers employed. The hourly wages paid to workers are much higher than the average hourly wages for all manufacturing. The gap between the hourly wages of the workers in the automotive industry and the rest of the workers in the transportation equipment industry has been widening considerably since 1985.

    The auto industry has weathered free trade with the United States without suffering the job losses or decreasing productivity that some analysts predicted before the agreement took effect. In fact, productivity has increased, as have incomes.

    Over 70% of the output was exported, mostly to the United States. Given the sustained prosperity that the United States has enjoyed for more than a decade now, it is not surprising that the Canadian transportation equipment industries have also performed well.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 46-250-X
    Description:

    The chemical and chemical products industry is one of the key manufacturing industries in Canada. In 1996, despite an increase in exports and in prices, the growth this industry has known since the beginning of the decade slowed down. This leading-edge industry employs a scientific labour force, which is not always associated with manufacturing.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999101
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors contributing to innovative activity in the Canadian food processing sector. The study first focuses on the importance of research and development activity and advanced business practices used by production and engineering departments. Second, it examines the extent to which larger firm size and less competition serve to stimulate competition-the so-called Schumpeterian hypothesis. Third, the effect of the nationality of a firm on innovation is investigated. Finally, industry effects are examined.

    The paper finds that business practices are significantly related to the probability that a firm is innovative. This is also the case for R&D. Size effects are significant, particularly for process innovations. Elsewhere, their effect is greatly diminished once business practices are included. Foreign ownership is significant only for process innovations and not for product innovations. Competition matters, more so for product than for process innovations. Establishments in the 'other' food products industry tend to lead when it comes to innovation, whereas fish product plants tend to lag.

    Release date: 1999-11-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 33-250-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1997, the rubber products industries (Major Group 15) increased the value of its shipments by 7.7% from the previous year. According to the Monthly Survey of Manufacturing (MSM), shipments grew an additional 6.6% in 1998. This strength is largely due to low inflation, low interest rates, increased exports and increased demand for automobiles.

    This document presents an overview of rubber products manufacturing in Canada and highlights key factors which have contributed to its improved performance over the last few years. Most of the data presented are based on the 1997 Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM).

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 61F0041M1997001
    Description:

    Primary product specialization and coverage ratios are now being produced and published for Canadian manufacturing industries. This paper reviews concepts, outlines uses, summarizes 1994 data, details a number of methodological issues, examines sources of change over time and measures those sources by means of a shift/share decomposition. The paper also describes the algorithm that has been developed for detecting and treating confidential values. This algorithm includes the use of rounding and the application of ranges; such treatment maintains confidentiality while allowing specialization and coverage data to be released for each and every manufacturing industry. The Appendix comprises specialization and coverage ratios for 1994.

    Release date: 1999-09-01
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: