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All (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-518-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The food-processing industry benefits from a wide a range of new advanced technologies. Technological advances include computer-based information and control systems, as well as sophisticated processing and packaging methods that enhance product quality, improve food safety and reduce costs. Continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are examples of related business practices.

    This study examines the use of advanced technologies in the food-processing industry. It focuses not just on the incidence and intensity of use of these new technologies but also on the way technology relates to overall firm strategy. It also examines how technology use is affected by selected industry structural characteristics and how the adoption of technologies affects the performance of firms. It considers as well how the environment influences technological change. The nature and structure of the industry are shown to condition the competitive environment, the business strategies that are pursued, product characteristics and the role of technology.

    Firms make strategic choices in light of technological opportunities and the risks and opportunities provided by their competitive environments. They implement strategies through appropriate business practices and activities, including the development of core competencies in the areas of marketing, production and human resources, as well as technology. Firms that differ in size and nationality choose to pursue different technological strategies. This study focuses on how these differences are reflected in the different use of technology for large and small establishments, for foreign and domestic plants and for plants in different industries.

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999105
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the growth in advanced technology use that has taken place over the last decade in Canadian manufacturing establishments. It presents the percentage of plants that use any one of the advanced technologies studied and how this has changed between 1989 and 1998. It also investigates how growth rates in the 1990s have varied across different technologies in specific functional areas, such as design and engineering, fabrication, communications, and integration and control. In an attempt to discover how changes in technology use are related to certain plant characteristics, the paper then investigates whether the growth in technology use varies across plants that differ by size, nationality and industry. Multivariate analysis is used to investigate the joint effects of plant size, foreign ownership and industry on the incidence of technology adoption and how these effects have changed over the last decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 42-251-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "The transportation equipment industries in Canada, 1985 - 1997 - A review of change". The transportation equipment industries are the largest industrial manufacturing group in Canada representing more than a quarter of the total value of manufacturing shipments in 1997. They include the manufacturing of a diverse range of products, ranging from aircraft to ships to automobile assembly to vehicle parts and accessories manufacturing. As well, the manufacturing activity also includes repairs to aircrafts, boats and ships.

    Since 1985 these industries have experienced sustained growth in terms of total shipments as well as the number of workers employed. The hourly wages paid to workers are much higher than the average hourly wages for all manufacturing. The gap between the hourly wages of the workers in the automotive industry and the rest of the workers in the transportation equipment industry has been widening considerably since 1985.

    The auto industry has weathered free trade with the United States without suffering the job losses or decreasing productivity that some analysts predicted before the agreement took effect. In fact, productivity has increased, as have incomes.

    Over 70% of the output was exported, mostly to the United States. Given the sustained prosperity that the United States has enjoyed for more than a decade now, it is not surprising that the Canadian transportation equipment industries have also performed well.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999101
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors contributing to innovative activity in the Canadian food processing sector. The study first focuses on the importance of research and development activity and advanced business practices used by production and engineering departments. Second, it examines the extent to which larger firm size and less competition serve to stimulate competition-the so-called Schumpeterian hypothesis. Third, the effect of the nationality of a firm on innovation is investigated. Finally, industry effects are examined.

    The paper finds that business practices are significantly related to the probability that a firm is innovative. This is also the case for R&D. Size effects are significant, particularly for process innovations. Elsewhere, their effect is greatly diminished once business practices are included. Foreign ownership is significant only for process innovations and not for product innovations. Competition matters, more so for product than for process innovations. Establishments in the 'other' food products industry tend to lead when it comes to innovation, whereas fish product plants tend to lag.

    Release date: 1999-11-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 33-250-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1997, the rubber products industries (Major Group 15) increased the value of its shipments by 7.7% from the previous year. According to the Monthly Survey of Manufacturing (MSM), shipments grew an additional 6.6% in 1998. This strength is largely due to low inflation, low interest rates, increased exports and increased demand for automobiles.

    This document presents an overview of rubber products manufacturing in Canada and highlights key factors which have contributed to its improved performance over the last few years. Most of the data presented are based on the 1997 Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM).

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 31F0026M1995001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper compares the destinations of manufacturing shipments and the significant changes that occurred in the data for the years 1984, 1990 and 1993. It also discusses exports, interprovincial trade and intraprovincial trade.

    Release date: 1999-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 31F0026M1996001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper evaluates changes in the destinations of shipments by province and by major manufacturing group. It also discusses information on exports, interprovincial trade and relative trade balance.

    Release date: 1999-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 31F0027M1995001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at the rationalization of production costs in the Canadian manufacturing sector by examining expenditures on four main inputs (wages, salaries, energy, and raw materials) as they have evolved over time.

    Release date: 1999-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 31F0027M1996001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper analyses changes to manufacturing establishments of all sizes in terms of four major areas: manufacturing activity gross output, production cost structure, productivity and employment structure.

    Release date: 1999-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 31F0027M1996002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the packaging products used by manufacturing industries, the evolution of production costs, a comparison of establishment groups (ranked by volume of shipments) and the stages of processing for the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole.

    Release date: 1999-05-11
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  • Journals and periodicals: 88-518-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The food-processing industry benefits from a wide a range of new advanced technologies. Technological advances include computer-based information and control systems, as well as sophisticated processing and packaging methods that enhance product quality, improve food safety and reduce costs. Continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are examples of related business practices.

    This study examines the use of advanced technologies in the food-processing industry. It focuses not just on the incidence and intensity of use of these new technologies but also on the way technology relates to overall firm strategy. It also examines how technology use is affected by selected industry structural characteristics and how the adoption of technologies affects the performance of firms. It considers as well how the environment influences technological change. The nature and structure of the industry are shown to condition the competitive environment, the business strategies that are pursued, product characteristics and the role of technology.

    Firms make strategic choices in light of technological opportunities and the risks and opportunities provided by their competitive environments. They implement strategies through appropriate business practices and activities, including the development of core competencies in the areas of marketing, production and human resources, as well as technology. Firms that differ in size and nationality choose to pursue different technological strategies. This study focuses on how these differences are reflected in the different use of technology for large and small establishments, for foreign and domestic plants and for plants in different industries.

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999105
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the growth in advanced technology use that has taken place over the last decade in Canadian manufacturing establishments. It presents the percentage of plants that use any one of the advanced technologies studied and how this has changed between 1989 and 1998. It also investigates how growth rates in the 1990s have varied across different technologies in specific functional areas, such as design and engineering, fabrication, communications, and integration and control. In an attempt to discover how changes in technology use are related to certain plant characteristics, the paper then investigates whether the growth in technology use varies across plants that differ by size, nationality and industry. Multivariate analysis is used to investigate the joint effects of plant size, foreign ownership and industry on the incidence of technology adoption and how these effects have changed over the last decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 42-251-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "The transportation equipment industries in Canada, 1985 - 1997 - A review of change". The transportation equipment industries are the largest industrial manufacturing group in Canada representing more than a quarter of the total value of manufacturing shipments in 1997. They include the manufacturing of a diverse range of products, ranging from aircraft to ships to automobile assembly to vehicle parts and accessories manufacturing. As well, the manufacturing activity also includes repairs to aircrafts, boats and ships.

    Since 1985 these industries have experienced sustained growth in terms of total shipments as well as the number of workers employed. The hourly wages paid to workers are much higher than the average hourly wages for all manufacturing. The gap between the hourly wages of the workers in the automotive industry and the rest of the workers in the transportation equipment industry has been widening considerably since 1985.

    The auto industry has weathered free trade with the United States without suffering the job losses or decreasing productivity that some analysts predicted before the agreement took effect. In fact, productivity has increased, as have incomes.

    Over 70% of the output was exported, mostly to the United States. Given the sustained prosperity that the United States has enjoyed for more than a decade now, it is not surprising that the Canadian transportation equipment industries have also performed well.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999101
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors contributing to innovative activity in the Canadian food processing sector. The study first focuses on the importance of research and development activity and advanced business practices used by production and engineering departments. Second, it examines the extent to which larger firm size and less competition serve to stimulate competition-the so-called Schumpeterian hypothesis. Third, the effect of the nationality of a firm on innovation is investigated. Finally, industry effects are examined.

    The paper finds that business practices are significantly related to the probability that a firm is innovative. This is also the case for R&D. Size effects are significant, particularly for process innovations. Elsewhere, their effect is greatly diminished once business practices are included. Foreign ownership is significant only for process innovations and not for product innovations. Competition matters, more so for product than for process innovations. Establishments in the 'other' food products industry tend to lead when it comes to innovation, whereas fish product plants tend to lag.

    Release date: 1999-11-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 33-250-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1997, the rubber products industries (Major Group 15) increased the value of its shipments by 7.7% from the previous year. According to the Monthly Survey of Manufacturing (MSM), shipments grew an additional 6.6% in 1998. This strength is largely due to low inflation, low interest rates, increased exports and increased demand for automobiles.

    This document presents an overview of rubber products manufacturing in Canada and highlights key factors which have contributed to its improved performance over the last few years. Most of the data presented are based on the 1997 Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM).

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 31F0026M1995001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper compares the destinations of manufacturing shipments and the significant changes that occurred in the data for the years 1984, 1990 and 1993. It also discusses exports, interprovincial trade and intraprovincial trade.

    Release date: 1999-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 31F0026M1996001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper evaluates changes in the destinations of shipments by province and by major manufacturing group. It also discusses information on exports, interprovincial trade and relative trade balance.

    Release date: 1999-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 31F0027M1995001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at the rationalization of production costs in the Canadian manufacturing sector by examining expenditures on four main inputs (wages, salaries, energy, and raw materials) as they have evolved over time.

    Release date: 1999-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 31F0027M1996001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper analyses changes to manufacturing establishments of all sizes in terms of four major areas: manufacturing activity gross output, production cost structure, productivity and employment structure.

    Release date: 1999-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 31F0027M1996002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the packaging products used by manufacturing industries, the evolution of production costs, a comparison of establishment groups (ranked by volume of shipments) and the stages of processing for the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole.

    Release date: 1999-05-11
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