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All (188) (0 to 10 of 188 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020003
    Description:

    From the early 2000s to the mid-2010s, the number of employees in manufacturing fell by roughly half a million in Canada. During that period, the percentage of Canadian men aged 21 to 55 employed mainly full time for at least 48 weeks in a given year fell by 5 percentage points, from 63.6% in 2000 to 58.6% in 2015. This study investigates whether the two trends are connected, i.e., whether the decline in manufacturing employment caused a decline in employment rates and wages among men.

    Release date: 2020-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019013
    Description:

    The need to measure both the desirable outputs (goods and services) and the undesirable outputs (emissions of greenhouse gases [GHGs] and criteria air contaminants [CACs]) from economic activity is becoming increasingly important as economic performance and environmental performance become ever more intertwined. Standard measures of multifactor productivity (MFP) growth provide insights into rising standards of living and the performance of economies, but they may be misleading if only desirable outputs are considered. This study presents estimates of environmentally adjusted multifactor productivity (EAMFP) growth using a new comprehensive database. This database contains information on GHG and CAC emissions, as well as on the production activities of Canadian manufacturers.

    Release date: 2019-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2018089
    Description:

    The industrial capacity utilization rate (ICUR) is the ratio of an industry’s actual output to its estimated potential output—it represents the intensity with which industries use their production capacity. The rate provides insight into the overall slack in the economy or in a firm at a given point in time.

    Release date: 2018-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016387
    Description:

    The paper investigates recent changes in the importance of foreign ownership in Canadian manufacturing in the 2000s, and also compares these changes to those in the previous decades from 1973 to 1999. The importance of foreign firms in manufacturing is measured by the share of output under foreign control, and its changes are examined at different levels: aggregate, sector and industry.

    Release date: 2017-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017398
    Description:

    Output growth in Canadian manufacturing was slower in the 2000s than in the 1990s. The sector’s real output declined, in contrast to an overall increase in output in the business sector (Clarke and Couture 2017). It fell rapidly during the 2007-to-2009 financial crisis, and returned to its pre-crisis level only in 2016. The market share of foreign-controlled firms also declined after 2000 (Baldwin and Li 2017).

    This paper examines the role of multinationals and reallocation in productivity growth in the Canadian manufacturing sector for the period from 2001 to 2010, a period of significant change in this sector. It contributes to the literature on several fronts. First, it complements the literature by examining productivity growth at the firm level. This paper also seeks to examine whether the decline that started around 2006 was associated with changes in the effect of reallocation and the role of foreign multinationals in aggregate productivity growth.

    Release date: 2017-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017074
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on changes in the Canadian manufacturing sector since 2000. Using data from the Canadian System of National Accounts and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, it provides an analysis of recent trends in Canadian manufacturing sector output, as well as a decomposition of the contribution of manufacturing industries to the evolution of the sector and a comparison with the United States.

    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017067
    Description:

    This Economic Insights compares the performance of automotive manufacturers and service providers since the 2008-2009 recession. The report highlights the structural declines in manufacturing, as export-oriented Canadian manufacturers have lost market share to Mexico. On account of strong post-recession growth in consumer demand for new motor vehicles in Canada, trends for the service industries have differed from manufacturing when comparing performance for output, employment and earnings. The paper will outline the differences in post-recession performance for these key indicators.

    Release date: 2017-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017068
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights recent data for motor vehicle manufacturers, focusing on industry developments in 2015 and 2016. The paper provides context on recent economic events influencing the competitiveness of the industry and highlights the interdependency between Canadian auto manufacturing and the U.S. retail market. Motor vehicle manufacturers in Canada repositioned in 2015 by increasing investment and shifting production towards light trucks. This report discusses the impact of these activities on sales, output and operating profits.

    Release date: 2017-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21
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Analysis (188)

Analysis (188) (0 to 10 of 188 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020003
    Description:

    From the early 2000s to the mid-2010s, the number of employees in manufacturing fell by roughly half a million in Canada. During that period, the percentage of Canadian men aged 21 to 55 employed mainly full time for at least 48 weeks in a given year fell by 5 percentage points, from 63.6% in 2000 to 58.6% in 2015. This study investigates whether the two trends are connected, i.e., whether the decline in manufacturing employment caused a decline in employment rates and wages among men.

    Release date: 2020-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019013
    Description:

    The need to measure both the desirable outputs (goods and services) and the undesirable outputs (emissions of greenhouse gases [GHGs] and criteria air contaminants [CACs]) from economic activity is becoming increasingly important as economic performance and environmental performance become ever more intertwined. Standard measures of multifactor productivity (MFP) growth provide insights into rising standards of living and the performance of economies, but they may be misleading if only desirable outputs are considered. This study presents estimates of environmentally adjusted multifactor productivity (EAMFP) growth using a new comprehensive database. This database contains information on GHG and CAC emissions, as well as on the production activities of Canadian manufacturers.

    Release date: 2019-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2018089
    Description:

    The industrial capacity utilization rate (ICUR) is the ratio of an industry’s actual output to its estimated potential output—it represents the intensity with which industries use their production capacity. The rate provides insight into the overall slack in the economy or in a firm at a given point in time.

    Release date: 2018-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016387
    Description:

    The paper investigates recent changes in the importance of foreign ownership in Canadian manufacturing in the 2000s, and also compares these changes to those in the previous decades from 1973 to 1999. The importance of foreign firms in manufacturing is measured by the share of output under foreign control, and its changes are examined at different levels: aggregate, sector and industry.

    Release date: 2017-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017398
    Description:

    Output growth in Canadian manufacturing was slower in the 2000s than in the 1990s. The sector’s real output declined, in contrast to an overall increase in output in the business sector (Clarke and Couture 2017). It fell rapidly during the 2007-to-2009 financial crisis, and returned to its pre-crisis level only in 2016. The market share of foreign-controlled firms also declined after 2000 (Baldwin and Li 2017).

    This paper examines the role of multinationals and reallocation in productivity growth in the Canadian manufacturing sector for the period from 2001 to 2010, a period of significant change in this sector. It contributes to the literature on several fronts. First, it complements the literature by examining productivity growth at the firm level. This paper also seeks to examine whether the decline that started around 2006 was associated with changes in the effect of reallocation and the role of foreign multinationals in aggregate productivity growth.

    Release date: 2017-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017074
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on changes in the Canadian manufacturing sector since 2000. Using data from the Canadian System of National Accounts and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, it provides an analysis of recent trends in Canadian manufacturing sector output, as well as a decomposition of the contribution of manufacturing industries to the evolution of the sector and a comparison with the United States.

    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017067
    Description:

    This Economic Insights compares the performance of automotive manufacturers and service providers since the 2008-2009 recession. The report highlights the structural declines in manufacturing, as export-oriented Canadian manufacturers have lost market share to Mexico. On account of strong post-recession growth in consumer demand for new motor vehicles in Canada, trends for the service industries have differed from manufacturing when comparing performance for output, employment and earnings. The paper will outline the differences in post-recession performance for these key indicators.

    Release date: 2017-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017068
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights recent data for motor vehicle manufacturers, focusing on industry developments in 2015 and 2016. The paper provides context on recent economic events influencing the competitiveness of the industry and highlights the interdependency between Canadian auto manufacturing and the U.S. retail market. Motor vehicle manufacturers in Canada repositioned in 2015 by increasing investment and shifting production towards light trucks. This report discusses the impact of these activities on sales, output and operating profits.

    Release date: 2017-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016384
    Description:

    In order to understand what drives aggregate fluctuations, many macroeconomic models point to aggregate shocks and discount the contribution of firm-specific shocks. Recent research from other developed countries, however, has found that aggregate fluctuations are in part driven by shocks to large firms. Using data on Canadian firms from the T2-LEAP database, which links financial statements from firms’ Corporate Income Tax Return with employment data from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program, this paper examines the contribution of large firms to industry-level fluctuations in gross output, investment and employment in the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 2016-11-21
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