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All (29) (0 to 10 of 29 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012021
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the size distribution of Canadian firms compiled for the research paper Small, Medium-sized, and Large Businesses in the Canadian Economy: Measuring Their Contribution to Gross Domestic Product from 2001 to 2008. The creation of estimates of gross domestic product by firm size is part of a program at Statistics Canada that examines the structure of the Canadian economy and its evolution.

    Release date: 2012-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012082
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper adds to our understanding of the contributions made to the economy by small, medium-sized, and large businesses in Canada. It does this by examining the shares of gross domestic product (GDP) produced by each of these size groups in the business sector.

    Previous studies relied predominately on employment, an input to the production process, rather than on a measure of output. This study overcomes this problem by focusing directly on GDP.

    Release date: 2012-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012020
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines how much crossing the border adds to the cost of moving goods by truck. It quantifies the cost of border delays, border-related compliance costs, and other costs associated with moving goods to and from Canada's main trading partner. It is based on the paper Trucking Across the Border: The Relative Cost of Cross-border and Domestic Trucking, 2004 to 2009, by William Anderson and Mark Brown.

    Release date: 2012-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012081
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite the elimination of tariff barriers between Canada and the United States, the volume of trade between the two countries has been less than would be expected if there were no impediments. While considerable work has been done to gauge the degree of integration between the Canadian and U.S. economies through trade, relatively little analysis has parsed out the underlying costs for cross-border trade. The costs of crossing the border can be divided into formal tariff barriers, non-tariff barriers, and the cost of the transport system itself. This paper focuses on the latter by estimating the cost of shipping goods by truck between Canada and the U.S. during the 2004-to-2009 period. The analysis assesses the degree to which costs to ship goods by truck to and from the U.S. exceed those within Canada by measuring the additional costs on a level and an ad valorem basis. The latter provides an estimate of the tariff equivalent transportation cost that applies to cross-border trade. These costs are further broken down into fixed and variable (line-haul) costs. Higher fixed costs are consistent with border delays and border compliance costs which are passed on to the consumers of trucking services. Higher line-haul costs may result from difficulties obtaining backhauls for a portion of the trip home. Such difficulties may stem from trade imbalances and regulations that restrict the ability of Canadian-based carriers to transport goods between two points in the United States.

    Release date: 2012-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series highlights the new set of estimates for Canadian direct investment abroad and Foreign direct investment in Canada that present Canada's international investment position on a market value basis. It is one of a series of Economic Insights articles designed to emphasize key aspects of the new national accounts data and their utility for analyses of the Canadian economy. Several of these articles highlight changes to the organization of the national accounts data or draw attention to improvements in measurement.

    Release date: 2012-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012019
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This special edition article in the Economic Insights series is designed to provide users with a concise, integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. It places recent movements in these economic data into context by highlighting the cumulative changes that have occurred subsequent to the recession of 2008-09. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to facilitate ongoing assessments of the Canadian economy.

    All of the output data presented in this report are consistent with those published in the historical revision to the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA12), released on October 1, 2012. All data are seasonally adjusted and expressed in current dollars unless otherwise stated.

    Release date: 2012-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012080
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This research paper constructs two experimental measures of the economic output of the education sector for Canada: an income-based measure and a cost-based measure. The measures differ from the existing measure currently used in the National Accounts, which is based on the volume of total input, and can be used to examine the productivity performance of the education sector. Both approaches are predicated on the notion that the output of the education sector represents investment in human capital. The income-based approach measures investment in education as increments in the future stream of earnings arising from education. The cost-based approach measures investment as total expenditures related to education.

    Release date: 2012-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents new income data on financial corporations derived from the revised Canadian System of National Accounts. It is one of a series of articles designed to emphasize key aspects of the new national accounts data and their utility for analyses of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2012-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series discusses the impact of capitalization of research and development (R&D) expenditure on gross domestic product (GDP) and productivity growth. Capitalizing R&D expenditure increases the scope of investment, and hence, the level of measured capital and GDP. Because R&D expenditure accounts for a small share of GDP, R&D capitalization has little impact on GDP and labour productivity growth.

    Release date: 2012-10-12
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Analysis (29)

Analysis (29) (0 to 10 of 29 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-402-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented in almanac style, the 2012 Canada Year Book contains more than 500 pages of tables, charts and succinct analytical articles on every major area of Statistics Canada's expertise. The Canada Year Book is the premier reference on the social and economic life of Canada and its citizens.

    Release date: 2012-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012021
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the size distribution of Canadian firms compiled for the research paper Small, Medium-sized, and Large Businesses in the Canadian Economy: Measuring Their Contribution to Gross Domestic Product from 2001 to 2008. The creation of estimates of gross domestic product by firm size is part of a program at Statistics Canada that examines the structure of the Canadian economy and its evolution.

    Release date: 2012-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012082
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper adds to our understanding of the contributions made to the economy by small, medium-sized, and large businesses in Canada. It does this by examining the shares of gross domestic product (GDP) produced by each of these size groups in the business sector.

    Previous studies relied predominately on employment, an input to the production process, rather than on a measure of output. This study overcomes this problem by focusing directly on GDP.

    Release date: 2012-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012020
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines how much crossing the border adds to the cost of moving goods by truck. It quantifies the cost of border delays, border-related compliance costs, and other costs associated with moving goods to and from Canada's main trading partner. It is based on the paper Trucking Across the Border: The Relative Cost of Cross-border and Domestic Trucking, 2004 to 2009, by William Anderson and Mark Brown.

    Release date: 2012-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012081
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite the elimination of tariff barriers between Canada and the United States, the volume of trade between the two countries has been less than would be expected if there were no impediments. While considerable work has been done to gauge the degree of integration between the Canadian and U.S. economies through trade, relatively little analysis has parsed out the underlying costs for cross-border trade. The costs of crossing the border can be divided into formal tariff barriers, non-tariff barriers, and the cost of the transport system itself. This paper focuses on the latter by estimating the cost of shipping goods by truck between Canada and the U.S. during the 2004-to-2009 period. The analysis assesses the degree to which costs to ship goods by truck to and from the U.S. exceed those within Canada by measuring the additional costs on a level and an ad valorem basis. The latter provides an estimate of the tariff equivalent transportation cost that applies to cross-border trade. These costs are further broken down into fixed and variable (line-haul) costs. Higher fixed costs are consistent with border delays and border compliance costs which are passed on to the consumers of trucking services. Higher line-haul costs may result from difficulties obtaining backhauls for a portion of the trip home. Such difficulties may stem from trade imbalances and regulations that restrict the ability of Canadian-based carriers to transport goods between two points in the United States.

    Release date: 2012-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series highlights the new set of estimates for Canadian direct investment abroad and Foreign direct investment in Canada that present Canada's international investment position on a market value basis. It is one of a series of Economic Insights articles designed to emphasize key aspects of the new national accounts data and their utility for analyses of the Canadian economy. Several of these articles highlight changes to the organization of the national accounts data or draw attention to improvements in measurement.

    Release date: 2012-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012019
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This special edition article in the Economic Insights series is designed to provide users with a concise, integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. It places recent movements in these economic data into context by highlighting the cumulative changes that have occurred subsequent to the recession of 2008-09. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to facilitate ongoing assessments of the Canadian economy.

    All of the output data presented in this report are consistent with those published in the historical revision to the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA12), released on October 1, 2012. All data are seasonally adjusted and expressed in current dollars unless otherwise stated.

    Release date: 2012-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012080
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This research paper constructs two experimental measures of the economic output of the education sector for Canada: an income-based measure and a cost-based measure. The measures differ from the existing measure currently used in the National Accounts, which is based on the volume of total input, and can be used to examine the productivity performance of the education sector. Both approaches are predicated on the notion that the output of the education sector represents investment in human capital. The income-based approach measures investment in education as increments in the future stream of earnings arising from education. The cost-based approach measures investment as total expenditures related to education.

    Release date: 2012-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents new income data on financial corporations derived from the revised Canadian System of National Accounts. It is one of a series of articles designed to emphasize key aspects of the new national accounts data and their utility for analyses of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2012-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series discusses the impact of capitalization of research and development (R&D) expenditure on gross domestic product (GDP) and productivity growth. Capitalizing R&D expenditure increases the scope of investment, and hence, the level of measured capital and GDP. Because R&D expenditure accounts for a small share of GDP, R&D capitalization has little impact on GDP and labour productivity growth.

    Release date: 2012-10-12
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