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  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410311
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The transition to adulthood is often viewed as a period where young people move by stages into adult roles: completing their schooling, leaving their parents' home, acquiring permanent work, finding a partner or spouse and becoming a parent. In recent years, social scientists have found that the transition to adulthood is taking longer to complete. Using census data to compare young adults in 1971 to those in 2001, it assesses just how lengthy the delay has become.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410312
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, the media have highlighted the particular difficulty of foreign-trained physicians who are unable to practice medicine in Canada. Foreign-trained engineers are another professional group encountering similar difficulties in practicing their profession. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population, this article documents the extent to which foreign trained physicians and engineers are not employed in the occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Stats in brief: 11-008-X200700410313
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The richest source of information on the socio-economic condition of Canadian society is the Census of Population conducted every five years. Canadian Social Trends will be highlighting some of the key trends observed in data released from the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610378
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    According to some sources, many young adults are living with their parents longer (or returning after their initial departure) in order to save so they can purchase their own home when they eventually leave their parents' home. How closely does this theory reflect reality? This article examines whether there is a link between the age at which young people leave home, and the likelihood that they become homeowners in their 30s.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610379
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights some of the key trends observed in age and sex data from the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610380
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights some of the key trends observed in family data from the 2006 Census

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • 8. Census snapshot Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700713017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The richest source of information on the socio-economic condition of Canadian society is the Census of Population conducted every five years. Canadian Social Trends will be highlighting some of the key trends observed in data released from the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200700310455
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines driving and commuting patterns from a gender perspective. Trip chaining, the practice of stopping at intermediate points during a journey, is analyzed using data from the 2005 Canadian Vehicle Survey. Next-stage destinations and the number of stops made while driving are compared for men and women.

    Release date: 2007-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007303
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, we use new Canadian data containing detailed information on standardized test scores, school marks, parental and peer influences, and other socio-economic background characteristics of boys and girls to try to account for the large gender gap in university attendance. Among 19-year-old youth in 2003, 38.8% of girls had attended university, compared with only 25.7% of boys. However, young men and women were about equally likely to attend college. We find that differences in observable characteristics between boys and girls account for more than three quarters (76.8%) of the gap in university participation. In order of importance, the main factors are differences in school marks at age 15, standardized test scores in reading at age 15, study habits, parental expectations and the university earnings premium relative to high school. Altogether, the four measures of academic abilities used in the study "overall marks, performance on standardized reading tests, study habits and repeating grade" collectively account for 58.9% of the gender gap in university participation. These results suggest that understanding why girls outperform boys in the classroom may be a key to understanding the gender divide in university participation.

    Release date: 2007-09-20
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  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410311
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The transition to adulthood is often viewed as a period where young people move by stages into adult roles: completing their schooling, leaving their parents' home, acquiring permanent work, finding a partner or spouse and becoming a parent. In recent years, social scientists have found that the transition to adulthood is taking longer to complete. Using census data to compare young adults in 1971 to those in 2001, it assesses just how lengthy the delay has become.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410312
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, the media have highlighted the particular difficulty of foreign-trained physicians who are unable to practice medicine in Canada. Foreign-trained engineers are another professional group encountering similar difficulties in practicing their profession. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population, this article documents the extent to which foreign trained physicians and engineers are not employed in the occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Stats in brief: 11-008-X200700410313
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The richest source of information on the socio-economic condition of Canadian society is the Census of Population conducted every five years. Canadian Social Trends will be highlighting some of the key trends observed in data released from the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610378
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    According to some sources, many young adults are living with their parents longer (or returning after their initial departure) in order to save so they can purchase their own home when they eventually leave their parents' home. How closely does this theory reflect reality? This article examines whether there is a link between the age at which young people leave home, and the likelihood that they become homeowners in their 30s.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610379
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights some of the key trends observed in age and sex data from the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610380
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights some of the key trends observed in family data from the 2006 Census

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • 8. Census snapshot Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700713017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The richest source of information on the socio-economic condition of Canadian society is the Census of Population conducted every five years. Canadian Social Trends will be highlighting some of the key trends observed in data released from the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200700310455
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines driving and commuting patterns from a gender perspective. Trip chaining, the practice of stopping at intermediate points during a journey, is analyzed using data from the 2005 Canadian Vehicle Survey. Next-stage destinations and the number of stops made while driving are compared for men and women.

    Release date: 2007-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007303
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, we use new Canadian data containing detailed information on standardized test scores, school marks, parental and peer influences, and other socio-economic background characteristics of boys and girls to try to account for the large gender gap in university attendance. Among 19-year-old youth in 2003, 38.8% of girls had attended university, compared with only 25.7% of boys. However, young men and women were about equally likely to attend college. We find that differences in observable characteristics between boys and girls account for more than three quarters (76.8%) of the gap in university participation. In order of importance, the main factors are differences in school marks at age 15, standardized test scores in reading at age 15, study habits, parental expectations and the university earnings premium relative to high school. Altogether, the four measures of academic abilities used in the study "overall marks, performance on standardized reading tests, study habits and repeating grade" collectively account for 58.9% of the gender gap in university participation. These results suggest that understanding why girls outperform boys in the classroom may be a key to understanding the gender divide in university participation.

    Release date: 2007-09-20
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