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  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this paper, we provide an international comparison of the growth in Canadian and U.S. manufacturing industries over the 1961-to-2003 period. We find that average annual growth rates of labour productivity growth were almost identical in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors during this period. But the sources of labour productivity growth differed in the two countries. Intermediate input deepening was a more important source of labour productivity growth in Canada than in the United States, while investment in capital and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth were more important in the United States than in Canada. After 1996, labour productivity growth in Canada was lower than in the United States. The post-1996 slower labour productivity growth in Canada relative to the United States was due to slower growth in MFP and slower growth in capital intensity. The slower MFP growth in Canada accounted for 60% of Canada - United States labour productivity growth difference, and slower growth in capital intensity accounted for 30%. The slower MFP growth in the Canadian manufacturing sector relative to that of the United States after 1996 was due to lower MFP growth in the computer and electronic products industry. The slower growth in capital'labour ratio in the Canadian manufacturing compared with the United States after 1996 is related to the changes in relative prices of capital and labour inputs in the two countries.

    Release date: 2007-12-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-604-M2007052
    Description:

    This Canadian Tourism Satellite Account Handbook developed by Statistics Canada is intended as a guide to how the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account (CTSA) is compiled. The Tourism Satellite Account (TSA) has become the internationally recognized framework and a vital tool by which to measure tourism activity in an economy. The goal of this handbook is to make the CTSA and its inner workings as transparent as possible by bringing previous internal documentation into the public realm along side previously published documents and new documentation. By sharing the Canadian practical experiences in development of the TSA, it should benefit other countries and other interested practitioners in the process of developing and understanding TSAs.

    This handbook covers information on the relevant tourism and national accounting concepts and definitions related to the CTSA. Detailed explanations of the various survey data sources and the methods used to move this data into the TSA framework are discussed.

    Release date: 2007-12-14

  • Table: 65-508-X2007001
    Description:

    This issue provides a snapshot of the past ten years of Canada's trade with China. Canadian exports and imports have increased at a steady pace since 1996, reaching record highs for each by the end of 2005. Overall, Canada recorded a trade deficit with China of $22.4 billion in 2005.

    Release date: 2007-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701210464
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether cross-border shopping has taken flight with the loonie. It finds that measured by the number of trips to the US, the average spent per trip or even online purchases, the recent increase in cross-border shopping has been minimal, especially outside of Ontario. More notable is the drop in US visitors to Canada. Meanwhile, overseas travel in and out of Canada continues to grow rapidly.

    Release date: 2007-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200700310454
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Natural resources, including energy, timber and minerals, contribute significantly to Canada's total wealth. This article examines the growth in resource wealth, from 1997 to 2006. It also describes the changes in natural resource prices, reserves and extraction costs.

    Release date: 2007-12-10

  • Table: 15-003-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data is an electronic publication that contains a series of tables on productivity growth and related variables for the business sector and its 51 major sub-sectors based on the North American Industry Classification System. These tables allow users to have a broader perspective on Canadian economic performance. They complement the information available on CANSIM which offers more detail, particularly at the industry level.

    Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) are responsible for producing, analyzing and disseminating Statistics Canada's official data on productivity and for producing and integrating data on employment, hours worked and capital services consistent with the Canadian System of National Accounts. To this end, the CPA comprise three programs. The quarterly program provides current estimates on labour productivity and labour costs at the aggregate level for 15 industry groups. The annual national program provides yearly estimates on labour productivity, multifactor productivity and several indicators of sources of growth and competitiveness as they apply to the major sectors of the economy and to the industry level. Lastly, the annual provincial program, as an integral part of the Provincial Economic Accounts, provides estimates on employment, hours worked, labour productivity and labour costs at the industry level for each province and territory.

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data covers four series of statistical tables:

    Table 1: Output, labour compensation, capital cost and cost of intermediate inputs in current dollars

    Table 2: Productivity and related measures

    Table 3: Productivity and related measures for the business sector, Canada and United States

    Table 4: Productivity and related measures for the manufacturing sector, Canada and United States

    Productivity measures the efficiency with which inputs (labour and capital in particular) are utilized in production. Productivity measures can be applied to a single input, such as labour productivity (output per hour worked), as well as to multifactor productivity (output per unit of combined labour and capital inputs). Statistics Canada produces these two main measures of productivity, but other productivity ratios can also be measured (e.g., output per unit of capital services).

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2007014
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) of Statistics Canada maintain two multifactor productivity (MFP) programs.

    The Major Sector Multifactor Productivity Program develops the indexes of MFP for the total business sector and major industry groups in the business sector.

    The Industry Multifactor Productivity Program or the Industry KLEMS Productivity Program develops the industry productivity database that includes MFP indexes, output, capital (K), labour (L), energy (E), materials (M) and services (S) inputs for the individual industries of the business sector at various levels of industry aggregation. This paper describes the methodologies and data sources that are used to construct the major sector MFP indexes and the industry productivity database (or the KLEMS database). More specifically, this paper is meant to:provide a background of the major sector MFP program and the industry KLEMS productivity program;present the methodology for measuring MFP;describe the data sources and data available from the MFP programs;present a quality rating of the industry KLEMS productivity data; anddescribe the research agenda related to the MFP program.

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007047
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of aberrant observations in the Capital, Labour, Energy, Materials and Services (KLEMS) database and a method for dealing with them. The level of disaggregation, data construction and economic shocks all potentially lead to aberrant observations that can influence estimates and inference if care is not exercised. Commonly applied pre-tests, such as the augmented Dickey-Fuller and the Kwaitkowski, Phillips, Schmidt and Shin tests, need to be used with caution in this environment because they are sensitive to unusual data points. Moreover, widely known methods for generating statistical estimates, such as Ordinary Least Squares, may not work well when confronted with aberrant observations. To address this, a robust method for estimating statistical relationships is illustrated.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2007010
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of the revisions to labour productivity estimates and related variables covering the revision cycle of the National Accounts from 2003 to 2006 for Canada and from 2004 to 2006 for the United States.

    Release date: 2007-11-27
Data (5)

Data (5) ((5 results))

  • Table: 65-508-X2007001
    Description:

    This issue provides a snapshot of the past ten years of Canada's trade with China. Canadian exports and imports have increased at a steady pace since 1996, reaching record highs for each by the end of 2005. Overall, Canada recorded a trade deficit with China of $22.4 billion in 2005.

    Release date: 2007-12-14

  • Table: 15-003-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data is an electronic publication that contains a series of tables on productivity growth and related variables for the business sector and its 51 major sub-sectors based on the North American Industry Classification System. These tables allow users to have a broader perspective on Canadian economic performance. They complement the information available on CANSIM which offers more detail, particularly at the industry level.

    Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) are responsible for producing, analyzing and disseminating Statistics Canada's official data on productivity and for producing and integrating data on employment, hours worked and capital services consistent with the Canadian System of National Accounts. To this end, the CPA comprise three programs. The quarterly program provides current estimates on labour productivity and labour costs at the aggregate level for 15 industry groups. The annual national program provides yearly estimates on labour productivity, multifactor productivity and several indicators of sources of growth and competitiveness as they apply to the major sectors of the economy and to the industry level. Lastly, the annual provincial program, as an integral part of the Provincial Economic Accounts, provides estimates on employment, hours worked, labour productivity and labour costs at the industry level for each province and territory.

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data covers four series of statistical tables:

    Table 1: Output, labour compensation, capital cost and cost of intermediate inputs in current dollars

    Table 2: Productivity and related measures

    Table 3: Productivity and related measures for the business sector, Canada and United States

    Table 4: Productivity and related measures for the manufacturing sector, Canada and United States

    Productivity measures the efficiency with which inputs (labour and capital in particular) are utilized in production. Productivity measures can be applied to a single input, such as labour productivity (output per hour worked), as well as to multifactor productivity (output per unit of combined labour and capital inputs). Statistics Canada produces these two main measures of productivity, but other productivity ratios can also be measured (e.g., output per unit of capital services).

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Table: 13-604-M2007058
    Description:

    This paper highlights the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account (CTSA) developed by Statistics Canada. The CTSA provides an economic measure of the importance of tourism in terms of expenditures, Gross Domestic Product and employment for Canada. It permits a comparison of tourism with other industries within Canada since the concepts and methods used are based on the framework of the Canadian System of National Accounts. The study revealed that tourism is an important part of Canada's well diversified economy. This paper presents the results of the CTSA for reference year 2002.

    Release date: 2007-10-16

  • Table: 16F0008X
    Description:

    This report presents estimates of national and provincial economic activity of the environment industry in Canada, including the revenues earned from the production of environmental goods, the provision of environmental services and the undertaking of environment-related construction activities.

    The environment industry is composed of establishments operating in a variety of industries that produce environmental goods and services. Environmental goods and services are goods and services that are used, or can potentially be used to measure, prevent, limit or correct environmental damage (both natural or by human activity) to water, air, soil as well as problems related to waste, noise and ecosystems. They also include clean or resource-efficient (eco-efficient) technologies that decrease material inputs, reduce energy consumption, recover valuable by-products, reduce emissions and/or minimise waste disposal problems.

    Release date: 2007-09-24

  • Table: 13-604-M2007054
    Description:

    This paper examines some of the reasons behind the slowdown of output growth relative to employment during 2006. It finds the two have converged frequently in recent years, including most of 2002 and 2003. After reviewing the sources of last year's productivity slowdown by industry, it looks at the negative impact of labour shortages on the quality of labour, especially in western Canada.

    Release date: 2007-02-23
Analysis (26)

Analysis (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this paper, we provide an international comparison of the growth in Canadian and U.S. manufacturing industries over the 1961-to-2003 period. We find that average annual growth rates of labour productivity growth were almost identical in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors during this period. But the sources of labour productivity growth differed in the two countries. Intermediate input deepening was a more important source of labour productivity growth in Canada than in the United States, while investment in capital and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth were more important in the United States than in Canada. After 1996, labour productivity growth in Canada was lower than in the United States. The post-1996 slower labour productivity growth in Canada relative to the United States was due to slower growth in MFP and slower growth in capital intensity. The slower MFP growth in Canada accounted for 60% of Canada - United States labour productivity growth difference, and slower growth in capital intensity accounted for 30%. The slower MFP growth in the Canadian manufacturing sector relative to that of the United States after 1996 was due to lower MFP growth in the computer and electronic products industry. The slower growth in capital'labour ratio in the Canadian manufacturing compared with the United States after 1996 is related to the changes in relative prices of capital and labour inputs in the two countries.

    Release date: 2007-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701210464
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether cross-border shopping has taken flight with the loonie. It finds that measured by the number of trips to the US, the average spent per trip or even online purchases, the recent increase in cross-border shopping has been minimal, especially outside of Ontario. More notable is the drop in US visitors to Canada. Meanwhile, overseas travel in and out of Canada continues to grow rapidly.

    Release date: 2007-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200700310454
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Natural resources, including energy, timber and minerals, contribute significantly to Canada's total wealth. This article examines the growth in resource wealth, from 1997 to 2006. It also describes the changes in natural resource prices, reserves and extraction costs.

    Release date: 2007-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007047
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of aberrant observations in the Capital, Labour, Energy, Materials and Services (KLEMS) database and a method for dealing with them. The level of disaggregation, data construction and economic shocks all potentially lead to aberrant observations that can influence estimates and inference if care is not exercised. Commonly applied pre-tests, such as the augmented Dickey-Fuller and the Kwaitkowski, Phillips, Schmidt and Shin tests, need to be used with caution in this environment because they are sensitive to unusual data points. Moreover, widely known methods for generating statistical estimates, such as Ordinary Least Squares, may not work well when confronted with aberrant observations. To address this, a robust method for estimating statistical relationships is illustrated.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2007010
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of the revisions to labour productivity estimates and related variables covering the revision cycle of the National Accounts from 2003 to 2006 for Canada and from 2004 to 2006 for the United States.

    Release date: 2007-11-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007048
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Evaluations of an economy's economic performance are often made using a measure of real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, which represents the average remuneration (labour income plus capital services) that an economy generates through domestic production.

    Because real GDP is a constant dollar measure of the remuneration to capital and labour in an economy, it does not account for who owns the capital, how much of it is used up through production or how relative price shifts affect the volume of goods and services that can be purchased.

    Modifications can be made to traditional estimates of GDP to account for these factors. This paper examines the performance of the Canadian economy using alternate measures' gross domestic income, gross national income and net national income. The paper also examines the relative performance of the Canadian and U.S. economies using standard GDP measures and these alternate measures.

    The comparison spans the period from 1980 to 2006, but focuses on the 2002-to-2006 period. During these latter years, changes in commodity prices, manufactured goods prices, the exchange rate, international investment income and capital consumption have all contributed importantly to real income growth in Canada.

    As a result, a very different picture of relative performance of the Canadian and U.S. economies emerges when an aggregate income measure is used that accounts for relative price changes, international income flows and capital consumption than when real GDP is used. From 2002 to 2006, U.S. real GDP per capita grew 9.3% while Canadian GDP per capita rose 7.0%, making it appear that the U.S. economy was outperforming the Canadian economy. However, once changes in resource prices and the exchange rate, international investment income and capital consumption are taken into account, real income per capita in the United States increased by 8.6%, which is similar to its GDP per capita growth. However, the Canadian adjusted measure of real income per capita growth rose 15.6%, more than twice the per capita real GDP growth in Canada and nearly double the U.S. rate.

    In contrast, the difference between the two economies was exactly the opposite in the period from 1980 to 2000 when commodity prices were falling, when the exchange rate was not appreciating and when outward flows of income to foreigners were increasing relative to the income paid to Canadians. During this period, when consideration is given to these factors, real income measures in Canada were falling relative to those in the United States.

    Release date: 2007-11-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 15-549-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper offers empirical evidence on the actual rates and forms of economic depreciation for a comprehensive set of assets. Using a Canadian micro database on the purchase and disposal of capital goods from Statistics Canada's Capital Expenditure Survey, the study estimates depreciation rates for 36 asset categories, which represent half of the Canadian business capital stock. Depreciation rates for the remaining assets are calibrated using the average age-price relationship from the estimation and surveyed service lives obtained from the Capital Expenditure Survey. The impact of the estimated depreciation rates on the Canadian capital stock and depreciation allowances is also presented.

    Release date: 2007-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700910332
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article finds that the volume of infrastructure capital has rebounded since 2000 after two decades of neglect. While infrastructure growth has been similar across regions, there are sharp differences in the type of asset targeted by the regions, especially when spending slowed after 1980.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2007011
    Description:

    This study examines Canadian productivity performance over the period 1961 to 2005. It investigates labour productivity growth and the sources of improvements therein-multifactor productivity growth, capital intensity, and skill upgrading. It also examines the contribution that productivity growth has made to economic growth, and to improvement on living standards. Finally, this study investigates the share of income going to labour, and the real hourly compensation of workers. This publication makes use of the new KLEMS database released on June 25, 2007 (http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/13-605-x/13-605-x2007005-eng.htm).

    Release date: 2007-09-13
Reference (9)

Reference (9) ((9 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-604-M2007052
    Description:

    This Canadian Tourism Satellite Account Handbook developed by Statistics Canada is intended as a guide to how the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account (CTSA) is compiled. The Tourism Satellite Account (TSA) has become the internationally recognized framework and a vital tool by which to measure tourism activity in an economy. The goal of this handbook is to make the CTSA and its inner workings as transparent as possible by bringing previous internal documentation into the public realm along side previously published documents and new documentation. By sharing the Canadian practical experiences in development of the TSA, it should benefit other countries and other interested practitioners in the process of developing and understanding TSAs.

    This handbook covers information on the relevant tourism and national accounting concepts and definitions related to the CTSA. Detailed explanations of the various survey data sources and the methods used to move this data into the TSA framework are discussed.

    Release date: 2007-12-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2007014
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) of Statistics Canada maintain two multifactor productivity (MFP) programs.

    The Major Sector Multifactor Productivity Program develops the indexes of MFP for the total business sector and major industry groups in the business sector.

    The Industry Multifactor Productivity Program or the Industry KLEMS Productivity Program develops the industry productivity database that includes MFP indexes, output, capital (K), labour (L), energy (E), materials (M) and services (S) inputs for the individual industries of the business sector at various levels of industry aggregation. This paper describes the methodologies and data sources that are used to construct the major sector MFP indexes and the industry productivity database (or the KLEMS database). More specifically, this paper is meant to:provide a background of the major sector MFP program and the industry KLEMS productivity program;present the methodology for measuring MFP;describe the data sources and data available from the MFP programs;present a quality rating of the industry KLEMS productivity data; anddescribe the research agenda related to the MFP program.

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X200700610374
    Description:

    Effective with the 2006 Provincial Economic Accounts release on November 8, 2007, the expenditure-based gross domestic product (GDP) will be converted to a 2002 reference year for its volume and price estimates.

    On October 31, 2007, the monthly gross domestic product (GDP) by industry estimates will use the North American Industry Classification System, NAICS 2002, and will convert to reference year 2002 for its volume estimates.

    Release date: 2007-10-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2007012
    Description:

    This paper examines the various products associated with the quarterly labour productivity program. It outlines the nature of the volatility in the very short-run estimates and examines properties of the revisions made to the estimates of Canadian labour productivity and its components (gross domestic product and hours worked) since the inception of the program in 2001.

    Release date: 2007-10-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-598-X
    Description:

    How does one summarize a lifetime of professional accomplishment? In some instances, one good way is to compile a book, as we have done here. This volume brings together in one place the substantial number of papers written by Kishori Lal during his lengthy career as a national accounts statistician at Statistics Canada.

    Kishori's papers cover a range of subject matter, responding to the twisting current of events through parts of five decades. They have one thing in common: All of the papers focus on one or another aspect of the development of Canada's System of National Accounts. Kishori believes deeply in and is utterly devoted to that system. It grew and evolved quite radically during Kishori's long career. The changes Canada's SNA went through followed closely, or in some cases led the development of the international SNA standard. He has left his mark indelibly on both.

    The advent of the 1993 SNA gave the impetus for several papers. These examined the implications of the new standard for Canada's national accounts and explored issues associated with its practical implementation in the 1997 historical revision. 'Production' was always a central focus of his work and many of the papers in this volume consider aspects of Canada's input-output accounts. Over the years he also turned his attention to several specific production measurement issues, such as the treatment of 'financial intermediation services indirectly measured' (FISIM) and inventory change. International comparisons were a special interest. Indeed one of his best papers, written in the year before he retired, contrasted the United States national accounts with the Canadian accounts. This detailed and authoritative paper was widely acclaimed south as well as north of the border. Subsequently the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicated they intended to prepare a similar paper, extending the comparison to include the Australian national accounts, and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in Paris asked if they could publish Kishori's work to give the study even wider exposure.

    Release date: 2007-06-21

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20070039641
    Description:

    The National Tourism Indicators will be revised back to 2001 and their volume and price estimates converted to a 2002 reference year, effective June 29, 2007.

    Release date: 2007-05-28

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20070029640
    Description:

    The expenditure-based gross domestic product (GDP) and associated components will be converted to a 2002 reference year for its volume and price estimates, effective May 31, 2007.

    Release date: 2007-05-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2007009
    Description:

    This paper examines the effects of alternative specifications of the user costs of capital on the estimated price and volume indices of capital services. It asks how sensitive the results are to the use of exogenous versus endogenous rates of return, to alternate ways of including capital gains, and to whether corrections are made for tax rates. The paper also examines the effect of the various user cost formulae on the measured multifactor productivity growth.

    Release date: 2007-04-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2007005
    Description:

    This paper generates depreciation profiles for a diverse set of assets based on patterns of resale prices and retirements. In doing so, it explores the sensitivity of estimates of the growth in capital stock and capital services to alternate estimates of depreciation.

    In the first instance, survival analysis techniques are used to estimate changes in valuation of assets over the course of their service life. In the second instance, a two-step procedure is utilized that first estimates the discard function for used assets (assets discarded at zero prices) and then uses the resulting estimates to correct for selection bias that arises when just positive used-asset prices are employed to estimate age-price profiles to produce depreciation rates. For the third method, a discard function and an asset efficiency function are jointly specified and estimated.

    These three different methods produce depreciation profiles that follow convex patterns. Accelerated profiles are apparent for many individual assets in the machinery and equipment and structures classes.

    We also compare the ex post estimates of length of life that are based on outcomes to ex ante expected lives and find they are much the same. We therefore choose ex ante lives along with information from the ex post rates on the rate of decline in an asset's value to generate a set of depreciation rates for use in the productivity accounts.

    We then use our depreciation model to produce estimates of the growth in capital stock and capital services over the 1961 to 1996 period. We find that the resulting estimates of capital stock and capital services are quite similar to those previously produced.

    Release date: 2007-02-12
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