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All (28) (0 to 10 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701210464
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether cross-border shopping has taken flight with the loonie. It finds that measured by the number of trips to the US, the average spent per trip or even online purchases, the recent increase in cross-border shopping has been minimal, especially outside of Ontario. More notable is the drop in US visitors to Canada. Meanwhile, overseas travel in and out of Canada continues to grow rapidly.

    Release date: 2007-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the results of several research studies conducted by the Micro-economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada that investigate the impact of advanced technology use on business performance. These studies combine establishment-level survey data on advanced technology practices with longitudinal data that measure changes in relative performance. Together, these studies provide strong evidence that technology strategies have considerable bearing on competitive outcomes after other correlates of plant performance are taken into account. Advanced communications technologies warrant special emphasis, as the use of these technologies has been shown to be closely associated with changes in relative productivity.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200700610385
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2007-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper's main objective is to provide a concise synthesis of a wide array of data and research on multinationals originating in Statistics Canada, focusing on both historical and current studies.

    Chapter 2 discusses the macroeconomic contribution of foreign multinationals, focusing on two leading indicators of foreign multinational activity, foreign control and foreign direct investment. This chapter also describes studies that evaluate the contribution that foreign-controlled companies make to aggregate trade flows, linking changes in multinational trade intensity to the strategic reorganization of their production activities.

    Chapter 3 concentrates on the strategies and activities of foreign multinationals that are relevant to ongoing debates over whether the presence of foreign multinationals promotes, or hampers, Canada's industrial competitiveness. This chapter first examines evidence that domestic and foreign firms respond differently to domestic market conditions. Second, it asks whether foreign firms compete in different ways than domestic firms do. Third, it examines the relative emphasis that foreign multinationals place on innovation and technology practices, and reports on the relationship between these activities and observable market outcomes. Fourth, it reports on the contribution that foreign-controlled firms make to productivity growth. Fifth, it discusses new research that focuses on the relationship between foreign ownership and head-office employment. Studies in these areas speak directly to the issue of whether foreign multinationals truncate or develop their corporate activities in host markets.

    Chapter 4 focuses on studies that examine the foreign activities of Canadian-owned multinationals and how their domestic plants compare to foreign-controlled plants operating in Canada.

    Chapter 5 offers an appraisal of Statistics Canada's research on multinationals.

    Release date: 2007-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701110382
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Exports to China in 2007 have risen faster than imports, reflecting its voracious appetite for resources. This has helped reduce Canada's dependence on US markets.

    Release date: 2007-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701010365
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks in more detail at how the commodity boom has affected our primary industries over the last 5 years, notably the shift from forestry to energy and mining. Rather than being 'hewers of wood and drawers of water', it is more accurate to say 'conveyors of crude and moilers of metals'.

    Release date: 2007-10-11

  • Notices and consultations: 11-015-X
    Description:

    This newsletter is a brief description of projects within the Business and Labour Market Analysis Division of Statistics Canada. The research covers a wide range of topics including labour market issues, low income, immigration, business firm dynamics, pensions, productivity, technology and innovation, as well as economic geography.

    Release date: 2007-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700910332
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article finds that the volume of infrastructure capital has rebounded since 2000 after two decades of neglect. While infrastructure growth has been similar across regions, there are sharp differences in the type of asset targeted by the regions, especially when spending slowed after 1980.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700810305
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The restructuring of the economy since 2003 has been driven by the surge in commodity prices resulting from the integration of China into the world economy. Labour and capital have shifted to the resource sector, notably in western Canada. Despite the rising exchange rate and lower prices manufacturers overall have maintained output while cutting jobs.

    Release date: 2007-08-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007044
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Utilizing a longitudinal micro data file of manufacturing plants (1974 to 1999), this study tests the effect of higher levels of trade on the level of industrial specialization experienced by regional manufacturing economies. Consistent with trade driven by comparative advantage, the analysis demonstrates that higher levels of export intensity (exports as a share of output) across regions are associated with greater industrial specialization. However, the analysis also shows that changes in export intensity are only weakly associated with changes in specialization. This occurs because comparative advantage tends to shift away from industries that account for a large share of regional manufacturing employment and towards industries that initially have lower shares. This ebb and flow of comparative advantage helps to explain why Canadian manufacturing regions have not become more specialized in an environment of increasing integration into the world market.

    Release date: 2007-06-25
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • 1. Trucking in Canada Archived
    Table: 53-222-X
    Description:

    This publication presents a comprehensive overview of the Canadian trucking industry, both for-hire and private (own account). Principal information includes statistics on revenues and expenses, equipment operated, investment, employment, and commodities transported from point of origin to point of destination. Also included are special studies, a glossary and an explanation of data quality measures and methodology.

    Release date: 2007-06-22
Analysis (26)

Analysis (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701210464
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether cross-border shopping has taken flight with the loonie. It finds that measured by the number of trips to the US, the average spent per trip or even online purchases, the recent increase in cross-border shopping has been minimal, especially outside of Ontario. More notable is the drop in US visitors to Canada. Meanwhile, overseas travel in and out of Canada continues to grow rapidly.

    Release date: 2007-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the results of several research studies conducted by the Micro-economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada that investigate the impact of advanced technology use on business performance. These studies combine establishment-level survey data on advanced technology practices with longitudinal data that measure changes in relative performance. Together, these studies provide strong evidence that technology strategies have considerable bearing on competitive outcomes after other correlates of plant performance are taken into account. Advanced communications technologies warrant special emphasis, as the use of these technologies has been shown to be closely associated with changes in relative productivity.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200700610385
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2007-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper's main objective is to provide a concise synthesis of a wide array of data and research on multinationals originating in Statistics Canada, focusing on both historical and current studies.

    Chapter 2 discusses the macroeconomic contribution of foreign multinationals, focusing on two leading indicators of foreign multinational activity, foreign control and foreign direct investment. This chapter also describes studies that evaluate the contribution that foreign-controlled companies make to aggregate trade flows, linking changes in multinational trade intensity to the strategic reorganization of their production activities.

    Chapter 3 concentrates on the strategies and activities of foreign multinationals that are relevant to ongoing debates over whether the presence of foreign multinationals promotes, or hampers, Canada's industrial competitiveness. This chapter first examines evidence that domestic and foreign firms respond differently to domestic market conditions. Second, it asks whether foreign firms compete in different ways than domestic firms do. Third, it examines the relative emphasis that foreign multinationals place on innovation and technology practices, and reports on the relationship between these activities and observable market outcomes. Fourth, it reports on the contribution that foreign-controlled firms make to productivity growth. Fifth, it discusses new research that focuses on the relationship between foreign ownership and head-office employment. Studies in these areas speak directly to the issue of whether foreign multinationals truncate or develop their corporate activities in host markets.

    Chapter 4 focuses on studies that examine the foreign activities of Canadian-owned multinationals and how their domestic plants compare to foreign-controlled plants operating in Canada.

    Chapter 5 offers an appraisal of Statistics Canada's research on multinationals.

    Release date: 2007-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701110382
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Exports to China in 2007 have risen faster than imports, reflecting its voracious appetite for resources. This has helped reduce Canada's dependence on US markets.

    Release date: 2007-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701010365
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks in more detail at how the commodity boom has affected our primary industries over the last 5 years, notably the shift from forestry to energy and mining. Rather than being 'hewers of wood and drawers of water', it is more accurate to say 'conveyors of crude and moilers of metals'.

    Release date: 2007-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700910332
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article finds that the volume of infrastructure capital has rebounded since 2000 after two decades of neglect. While infrastructure growth has been similar across regions, there are sharp differences in the type of asset targeted by the regions, especially when spending slowed after 1980.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700810305
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The restructuring of the economy since 2003 has been driven by the surge in commodity prices resulting from the integration of China into the world economy. Labour and capital have shifted to the resource sector, notably in western Canada. Despite the rising exchange rate and lower prices manufacturers overall have maintained output while cutting jobs.

    Release date: 2007-08-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007044
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Utilizing a longitudinal micro data file of manufacturing plants (1974 to 1999), this study tests the effect of higher levels of trade on the level of industrial specialization experienced by regional manufacturing economies. Consistent with trade driven by comparative advantage, the analysis demonstrates that higher levels of export intensity (exports as a share of output) across regions are associated with greater industrial specialization. However, the analysis also shows that changes in export intensity are only weakly associated with changes in specialization. This occurs because comparative advantage tends to shift away from industries that account for a large share of regional manufacturing employment and towards industries that initially have lower shares. This ebb and flow of comparative advantage helps to explain why Canadian manufacturing regions have not become more specialized in an environment of increasing integration into the world market.

    Release date: 2007-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007045
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity levels and productivity growth rates vary significantly over space. These differences are perhaps most pronounced between countries, but they remain acutely evident within national spaces as economic growth favors some cities and regions and not others. In this paper, we map the spatial variation in productivity levels across Canadian cities and we model the underlying determinants of that variation. We have two main goals. First, to confirm the existence, the nature and the size of agglomeration economies, that is, the gains in efficiency related to the spatial clustering of economic activity. We focus attention on the impacts of buyer-supplier networks, labour market pooling and knowledge spillovers. Second, we identify the geographical extent of knowledge spillovers using information on the location of individual manufacturing plants. Plant-level data developed by the Micro-economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada underpin the analysis. After controlling for a series of plant and firm characteristics, analysis reveals that the productivity performance of plants is positively influenced by all three of Marshall's mechanisms of agglomeration (Marshall, 1920). The analysis also shows that the effect of knowledge spillovers on productivity is spatially circumscribed, extending, at most, only 10 km beyond individual plants. The reliance of individual businesses on place-based economies varies across the sectors to which the businesses are aggregated. These sectors are defined by the factors that influence the process of competition'access to natural resources, labour costs, scale economies, product differentiation, and the application of scientific knowledge. Neither labour market pooling, buyer-supplier networks nor knowledge spillovers are universally important across all sectors. This paper provides confirmation of the importance of agglomeration, while also providing evidence that external economies are spatially bounded and not universally important across all industries.

    Release date: 2007-06-18
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Notices and consultations: 11-015-X
    Description:

    This newsletter is a brief description of projects within the Business and Labour Market Analysis Division of Statistics Canada. The research covers a wide range of topics including labour market issues, low income, immigration, business firm dynamics, pensions, productivity, technology and innovation, as well as economic geography.

    Release date: 2007-09-14
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