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  • Table: 81-595-M2007058
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report applies various assumptions regarding future participation rates in postsecondary education to projected demographic trends to create three scenarios that estimate the potential future population of students in postsecondary institutions in Canada and the provinces. Projections are provided separately for enrolments at the college and the university levels for three age cohorts: 17 to 19 year-olds, 20 to 24 year-olds and 25 to 29 year-olds. Demographic trends and participation rates in college and in university both vary widely across provinces. To reflect these differences, the analysis is presented at both a national level and for each of the ten provinces. At the national level, the sample size is large enough to allow analysis of trends in both full- and part-time enrolment at the national level; at the provincial level, we constrain our enquiry to full-time only. Demographic data on historical and projected population trends for each of the three age cohorts was provided by Demography Division, Statistics Canada, for the 1990 to 2031 period. Historical college and university participation rates were calculated as the ratio of enrolment to population for the three age cohorts as reported by the Labour Force Survey (LFS). We capture enrolments for the academic year through averaging enrolments over the eight-month period between September and April, for the academic years from 1990/1991 to 2005/2006. Because of the coverage of the LFS, the population considered is that of the ten provinces. Projections of possible future enrolment levels are provided based on three sets of assumptions or 'what if' scenarios: Scenario 1: Maintaining the status quo What if college and university participation rates remain at the average level over the 2003/2004 to 2005/2006 period? Scenario 2: Growth in line with historical trends What if national postsecondary participation rates were to maintain historical trends observed over the 1990/1991 to 2005/2006 period until 2016/2017, remaining constant thereafter? Scenario 3: Closing the gender gap What if, in future, male participation rates in postsecondary education matched the higher rates observed for females over the 2002/2003 to 2005/2006 period?

    Release date: 2007-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710613190
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Past studies of illness-related work absences have focused on annual figures and have not differentiated between full- and part-week absences. But the two have quite different seasonal patterns and long-term trends.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710813192
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For some years now, attention has been focused on the predicted retirement patterns of the baby-boom generation since a wave of early departures could seriously disrupt the labour force. However, recent studies and indicators suggest that baby boomers may not in fact be collectively fleeing employment for 'freedom 55. In 2006, a record proportion of 60 to 64 year-olds were in the labour force (45%) and the retirement age remained steady at 61.5. The article examines labour market trends of the population aged 55 to 64 and the employment characteristics of workers in this age group vis à vis those aged 25 to 54.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper will present the labour market outcomes based on data collected by the Labour Force Survey in 2006 for core working-age immigrants (those aged 25 to 54), since they are more likely to have completed school and less likely to have entered retirement than those in the 15 and over group. A brief demographic profile of all immigrants will be presented followed by analysis of the labour market outcomes of core working-age immigrants nationally, by province, selected census metropolitan areas (CMA) and by sex. The labour market outcomes for immigrant youths and immigrants aged 55 and over will follow, in addition to a discussion of education-based outcomes for the core-aged immigrants, the industries in which these immigrants work, as well as their occupations.

    Release date: 2007-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710513186
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Early training and skills development can open up opportunities and choices. Apart from schooling, teenagers can also begin to build up their human capital by working at a paid job, participating in volunteer activities, and even doing household chores. But an inordinate amount of time spent on unpaid and paid work activities could lead to unhealthy levels of stress and reduction in well-being, and negatively affect education outcomes. This article examines trends in the number of hours teenagers spend daily on education-related activities, paid work and housework.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-592-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This reference document presents an overview of the different questions used by Statistics Canada to identify Aboriginal peoples. It is divided into three parts. Part one is a brief description of the data sources and their limitations. Part 2 deals with the 2006 census questions used to identify Aboriginal peoples while Part 3 deals with the identification questions used in the Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS).

    Release date: 2007-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006037
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper estimates and analyses the economic impact of the culture sector on the Canadian provinces. It measures the contribution of the culture sector to provincial GDP and employment between 1996 and 2003.

    Release date: 2007-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710113179
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    By 2017, Aboriginal persons of working age (15 and older) are projected to number close to a million about 3.4% of the working-age population overall. With anticipated labour shortages in many areas, this growing population may constitute an important pool of workers. Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations in Western Canada are compared in terms of employment, occupational distribution, and skill level.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200700113177
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-01-25
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 81-595-M2007058
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report applies various assumptions regarding future participation rates in postsecondary education to projected demographic trends to create three scenarios that estimate the potential future population of students in postsecondary institutions in Canada and the provinces. Projections are provided separately for enrolments at the college and the university levels for three age cohorts: 17 to 19 year-olds, 20 to 24 year-olds and 25 to 29 year-olds. Demographic trends and participation rates in college and in university both vary widely across provinces. To reflect these differences, the analysis is presented at both a national level and for each of the ten provinces. At the national level, the sample size is large enough to allow analysis of trends in both full- and part-time enrolment at the national level; at the provincial level, we constrain our enquiry to full-time only. Demographic data on historical and projected population trends for each of the three age cohorts was provided by Demography Division, Statistics Canada, for the 1990 to 2031 period. Historical college and university participation rates were calculated as the ratio of enrolment to population for the three age cohorts as reported by the Labour Force Survey (LFS). We capture enrolments for the academic year through averaging enrolments over the eight-month period between September and April, for the academic years from 1990/1991 to 2005/2006. Because of the coverage of the LFS, the population considered is that of the ten provinces. Projections of possible future enrolment levels are provided based on three sets of assumptions or 'what if' scenarios: Scenario 1: Maintaining the status quo What if college and university participation rates remain at the average level over the 2003/2004 to 2005/2006 period? Scenario 2: Growth in line with historical trends What if national postsecondary participation rates were to maintain historical trends observed over the 1990/1991 to 2005/2006 period until 2016/2017, remaining constant thereafter? Scenario 3: Closing the gender gap What if, in future, male participation rates in postsecondary education matched the higher rates observed for females over the 2002/2003 to 2005/2006 period?

    Release date: 2007-11-21
Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710613190
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Past studies of illness-related work absences have focused on annual figures and have not differentiated between full- and part-week absences. But the two have quite different seasonal patterns and long-term trends.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710813192
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For some years now, attention has been focused on the predicted retirement patterns of the baby-boom generation since a wave of early departures could seriously disrupt the labour force. However, recent studies and indicators suggest that baby boomers may not in fact be collectively fleeing employment for 'freedom 55. In 2006, a record proportion of 60 to 64 year-olds were in the labour force (45%) and the retirement age remained steady at 61.5. The article examines labour market trends of the population aged 55 to 64 and the employment characteristics of workers in this age group vis à vis those aged 25 to 54.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper will present the labour market outcomes based on data collected by the Labour Force Survey in 2006 for core working-age immigrants (those aged 25 to 54), since they are more likely to have completed school and less likely to have entered retirement than those in the 15 and over group. A brief demographic profile of all immigrants will be presented followed by analysis of the labour market outcomes of core working-age immigrants nationally, by province, selected census metropolitan areas (CMA) and by sex. The labour market outcomes for immigrant youths and immigrants aged 55 and over will follow, in addition to a discussion of education-based outcomes for the core-aged immigrants, the industries in which these immigrants work, as well as their occupations.

    Release date: 2007-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710513186
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Early training and skills development can open up opportunities and choices. Apart from schooling, teenagers can also begin to build up their human capital by working at a paid job, participating in volunteer activities, and even doing household chores. But an inordinate amount of time spent on unpaid and paid work activities could lead to unhealthy levels of stress and reduction in well-being, and negatively affect education outcomes. This article examines trends in the number of hours teenagers spend daily on education-related activities, paid work and housework.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006037
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper estimates and analyses the economic impact of the culture sector on the Canadian provinces. It measures the contribution of the culture sector to provincial GDP and employment between 1996 and 2003.

    Release date: 2007-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710113179
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    By 2017, Aboriginal persons of working age (15 and older) are projected to number close to a million about 3.4% of the working-age population overall. With anticipated labour shortages in many areas, this growing population may constitute an important pool of workers. Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations in Western Canada are compared in terms of employment, occupational distribution, and skill level.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200700113177
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-01-25
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-592-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This reference document presents an overview of the different questions used by Statistics Canada to identify Aboriginal peoples. It is divided into three parts. Part one is a brief description of the data sources and their limitations. Part 2 deals with the 2006 census questions used to identify Aboriginal peoples while Part 3 deals with the identification questions used in the Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS).

    Release date: 2007-06-07
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