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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via paper questionnaires and personal interviews conducted in January, February and March after the reference year. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces and the 3 territories. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2002-12-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002002
    Description:

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2001 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) labour interview, including question wording, possible responses and the flow of questions.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002003
    Description:

    This paper presents the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2001 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) preliminary questionnaire.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002004
    Description:

    This document presents the information for the Entry Exit portion of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) Labour interview.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20020016479
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Population Health Model (POHEM) is a policy analysis tool that helps answer "what-if" questions about the health and economic burden of specific diseases and the cost-effectiveness of administering new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. This simulation model is particularly pertinent in an era of fiscal restraint, when new therapies are generally expensive and difficult policy decisions are being made. More important, it provides a base for a broader framework to inform policy decisions using comprehensive disease data and risk factors. Our "base case" models comprehensively estimate the lifetime costs of treating breast, lung and colorectal cancer in Canada. Our cancer models have shown the large financial burden of diagnostic work-up and initial therapy, as well as the high costs of hospitalizing those dying of cancer. Our core cancer models (lung, breast and colorectal cancer) have been used to evaluate the impact of new practice patterns. We have used these models to evaluate new chemotherapy regimens as therapeutic options for advanced lung cancer; the health and financial impact of reducing the hospital length of stay for initial breast cancer surgery; and the potential impact of population-based screening for colorectal cancer. To date, the most interesting intervention we have studied has been the use of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer among high risk women.

    Release date: 2002-10-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016225
    Description:

    The European Union Labour Forces Survey (LFS) is based on national surveys that were originally very different. For the past decade, under pressure from increasingly demanding users (particularly with respect to timeliness, comparability and flexibility), the LFS has been subjected to a constant process of quality improvement.

    The following topics are presented in this paper:A. the quality improvement process, which comprises screening national survey methods, target structure, legal foundations, quality reports, more accurate and more explicit definitions of components, etc.;B. expected or achieved results, which include an ongoing survey producing quarterly results within reasonable time frames, comparable employment and unemployment rates over time and space in more than 25 countries, specific information on current political topics, etc.;C. continuing shortcomings, such as implementation delays in certain countries, possibilities of longitudinal analysis, public access to microdata, etc.; D. future tasks envisioned, such as adaptation of the list of ISCO and ISCED variables and nomenclatures (to take into account evolution in employment and teaching methods), differential treatment of structural variables and increased recourse to administrative files (to limit respondent burden), harmonization of questionnaires, etc.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016227
    Description:

    The reputation of a national statistical office depends on the level of service it provides. Quality must be a core value and providing excellent service has to be embedded in the culture of a statistical organization.

    The paper outlines what is meant by a high quality statistical service. It explores factors that contribute to a quality work culture. In particular, it outlines the activities and experiences of the Australian Bureau of Statistics in maintaining a quality culture.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016228
    Description:

    The Current Population Survey is the primary source of labour force data for the United States. Throughout any survey process, it is critical that data quality be ensured. This paper discusses how quality issues are addressed during all steps of the survey process, including the development of the sample frame, sampling operations, sample control, data collection, editing, imputation, estimation, questionnaire development. It also reviews the quality evaluations that are built into the survey process. The paper concludes with a discussion of current research and possible future improvements to the survey.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016229
    Description:

    This paper discusses the approach that Statistics Canada has taken to improve the quality of annual business surveys through their integration in the Unified Enterprise Survey (UES). The primary objective of the UES is to measure the final annual sales of goods and services accurately by province, in sufficient detail and in a timely manner.

    This paper describes the methodological approaches that the UES has used to improve financial and commodity data quality in four broad areas. These include improved coherence of the data collected from different levels of the enterprise, better coverage of industries, better depth of information (in the sense of more content detail and estimates for more detailed domains) and better consistency of the concepts and methods across industries.

    The approach, in achieving quality, has been to (a) establish a base measure of the quality of the business survey program prior to the UES, (b) measure the annual data quality of the UES, and (c) carry out specific studies to better understand the quality of UES data and methods.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016230
    Description:

    This publication consists of three papers, each addressing data quality issues associated with a large and complex survey. Two of the case studies involve household surveys of labour force activity and the third focuses on a business survey. The papers each address a data quality topic from a different perspective, but share some interesting common threads.

    Release date: 2002-09-12
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  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20020016479
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Population Health Model (POHEM) is a policy analysis tool that helps answer "what-if" questions about the health and economic burden of specific diseases and the cost-effectiveness of administering new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. This simulation model is particularly pertinent in an era of fiscal restraint, when new therapies are generally expensive and difficult policy decisions are being made. More important, it provides a base for a broader framework to inform policy decisions using comprehensive disease data and risk factors. Our "base case" models comprehensively estimate the lifetime costs of treating breast, lung and colorectal cancer in Canada. Our cancer models have shown the large financial burden of diagnostic work-up and initial therapy, as well as the high costs of hospitalizing those dying of cancer. Our core cancer models (lung, breast and colorectal cancer) have been used to evaluate the impact of new practice patterns. We have used these models to evaluate new chemotherapy regimens as therapeutic options for advanced lung cancer; the health and financial impact of reducing the hospital length of stay for initial breast cancer surgery; and the potential impact of population-based screening for colorectal cancer. To date, the most interesting intervention we have studied has been the use of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer among high risk women.

    Release date: 2002-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016227
    Description:

    The reputation of a national statistical office depends on the level of service it provides. Quality must be a core value and providing excellent service has to be embedded in the culture of a statistical organization.

    The paper outlines what is meant by a high quality statistical service. It explores factors that contribute to a quality work culture. In particular, it outlines the activities and experiences of the Australian Bureau of Statistics in maintaining a quality culture.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016228
    Description:

    The Current Population Survey is the primary source of labour force data for the United States. Throughout any survey process, it is critical that data quality be ensured. This paper discusses how quality issues are addressed during all steps of the survey process, including the development of the sample frame, sampling operations, sample control, data collection, editing, imputation, estimation, questionnaire development. It also reviews the quality evaluations that are built into the survey process. The paper concludes with a discussion of current research and possible future improvements to the survey.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016230
    Description:

    This publication consists of three papers, each addressing data quality issues associated with a large and complex survey. Two of the case studies involve household surveys of labour force activity and the third focuses on a business survey. The papers each address a data quality topic from a different perspective, but share some interesting common threads.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016231
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. Its is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    In 2000, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) conducted monthly telephone surveys in 50 American states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico: each was responsible for collecting its own survey data. In Maine, data collection was split between the state health department and ORC Macro, a commercial market research firm. Examination of survey outcome rates, selection biases and missing values for income suggest that the Maine health department data are more accurate. However, out of 18 behavioural health risk factors, only four are statistically different by data collector, and for these four factors, the data collected by ORC Macro seem more accurate.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016233
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    From January 2000, the data collection method of the Finnish Consumer Survey was changed from a Labour Force Survey panel design mode to an independent survey. All interviews are now carried out centrally from Statistics Finland's Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) Centre. There have been suggestions that the new survey mode has been influencing the respondents' answers. This paper analyses the extent of obvious changes in the results of the Finnish Consumer Survey. This is accomplished with the help of a pilot survey. Furthermore, this paper studies the interviewer's role in the data collection process. The analysis is based on cross-tabulations, chi-square tests and multinomial logit models. It shows that the new survey method produces more optimistic estimations and expectations concerning economic matters than the old method did.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016235
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Police records collected by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) through the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program are the leading source of national crime statistics. Recently, audits to correct UCR records have raised concerns as to how to handle the errors discovered in these files. Concerns centre around the methodology used to detect errors and the procedures used to correct errors once they have been discovered. This paper explores these concerns, focusing on sampling methodology, establishment of a statistical-adjustment factor, and alternative solutions. The paper distinguishes the difference between sample adjustment and sample estimates of an agency's data, and recommends sample adjustment as the most accurate way of dealing with errors.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016236
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program has devoted a considerable amount of resources in a continuous effort to improve the quality of its data. In this paper, the authors introduce and discuss the use of the cross-ratios and chi-square measures to evaluate the rationality of the data. The UCR data is used to empirically illustrate this approach.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016237
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Secondary users of health information often assume that administrative data provides a relatively sound basis for making important planning and policy decisions. If errors are evenly or randomly distributed, this assumption may have little impact on these decisions. However, when information sources contain systematic errors, or when systematic errors are introduced during the creation of master files, this assumption can be damaging.

    The most common systematic errors involve underreporting activities for a specific population; inaccurate re-coding of spatial information; and differences in data entry protocols, which have raised questions about the consistency of data submitted by different tracking agencies. The Central East Health Information Partnership (CEHIP) has identified a number of systematic errors in administrative databases and has documented many of these in reports distributed to partner organizations.

    This paper describes how some of these errors were identified and notes the processes that give rise to the loss of data integrity. The conclusion addresses some of the impacts these problems have for health planners, program managers and policy makers.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016238
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Research programs building on population-based, longitudinal administrative data and record-linkage techniques are found in England, Scotland, the United States (the Mayo Clinic), Western Australia and Canada. These systems can markedly expand both the methodological and the substantive research in health and health care.

    This paper summarizes published, Canadian data quality studies regarding registries, hospital discharges, prescription drugs, and physician claims. It makes suggestions for improving registries, facilitating record linkage and expanding research into social epidemiology. New trends in case identification and health status measurement using administrative data have also been noted. And the differing needs for data quality research in each province have been highlighted.

    Release date: 2002-09-12
Reference (15)

Reference (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via paper questionnaires and personal interviews conducted in January, February and March after the reference year. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces and the 3 territories. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2002-12-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002002
    Description:

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2001 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) labour interview, including question wording, possible responses and the flow of questions.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002003
    Description:

    This paper presents the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2001 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) preliminary questionnaire.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002004
    Description:

    This document presents the information for the Entry Exit portion of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) Labour interview.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016225
    Description:

    The European Union Labour Forces Survey (LFS) is based on national surveys that were originally very different. For the past decade, under pressure from increasingly demanding users (particularly with respect to timeliness, comparability and flexibility), the LFS has been subjected to a constant process of quality improvement.

    The following topics are presented in this paper:A. the quality improvement process, which comprises screening national survey methods, target structure, legal foundations, quality reports, more accurate and more explicit definitions of components, etc.;B. expected or achieved results, which include an ongoing survey producing quarterly results within reasonable time frames, comparable employment and unemployment rates over time and space in more than 25 countries, specific information on current political topics, etc.;C. continuing shortcomings, such as implementation delays in certain countries, possibilities of longitudinal analysis, public access to microdata, etc.; D. future tasks envisioned, such as adaptation of the list of ISCO and ISCED variables and nomenclatures (to take into account evolution in employment and teaching methods), differential treatment of structural variables and increased recourse to administrative files (to limit respondent burden), harmonization of questionnaires, etc.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016229
    Description:

    This paper discusses the approach that Statistics Canada has taken to improve the quality of annual business surveys through their integration in the Unified Enterprise Survey (UES). The primary objective of the UES is to measure the final annual sales of goods and services accurately by province, in sufficient detail and in a timely manner.

    This paper describes the methodological approaches that the UES has used to improve financial and commodity data quality in four broad areas. These include improved coherence of the data collected from different levels of the enterprise, better coverage of industries, better depth of information (in the sense of more content detail and estimates for more detailed domains) and better consistency of the concepts and methods across industries.

    The approach, in achieving quality, has been to (a) establish a base measure of the quality of the business survey program prior to the UES, (b) measure the annual data quality of the UES, and (c) carry out specific studies to better understand the quality of UES data and methods.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016234
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    With the goal of obtaining a complete enumeration of the Canadian agricultural sector, the 2001 Census of Agriculture has been conducted using several collection methods. Challenges to the traditional drop-off and mail-back of paper questionnaires in a household-based enumeration have led to the adoption of supplemental methods using newer technologies to maintain the coverage and content of the census. Overall, this mixed-mode data collection process responds to the critical needs of the census programme at various points. This paper examines these data collection methods, several quality assessments, and the future challenges of obtaining a co-ordinated view of the methods' individual approaches to achieving data quality.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016269
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    In surveys with low response rates, non-response bias can be a major concern. While it is not always possible to measure the actual bias due to non-response, there are different approaches that help identify potential sources of non-response bias. In the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), surveys with a response rate lower than 70% must conduct a non-response bias analysis. This paper discusses the different approaches to non-response bias analyses using examples from NCES.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016293
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    This paper presents the Second Summit of the Americas Regional Education Indicators Project (PRIE), whose basic goal is to develop a set of comparable indicators for the Americas. This project is led by the Ministry of Education of Chile and has been developed in response to the countries' needs to improve their information systems and statistics. The countries need to construct reliable and relevant indicators to support decisions in education, both within their individual countries and the region as a whole. The first part of the paper analyses the importance of statistics and indicators in supporting educational policies and programs, and describes the present state of the information and statistics systems in these countries. It also discusses the major problems faced by the countries and reviews the countries' experiences in participating in other education indicators' projects or programs, such as the INES Program, WEI Project, MERCOSUR and CREMIS. The second part of the paper examines PRIE's technical co-operation program, its purpose and implementation. The second part also emphasizes how technical co-operation responds to the needs of the countries, and supports them in filling in the gaps in available and reliable data.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016308
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The Census Bureau uses response error analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of survey questions. For a given survey, questions that are deemed critical to the survey or considered problematic from past examination are selected for analysis. New or revised questions are prime candidates for re-interview. Re-interview is a new interview where a subset of questions from the original interview are re-asked to a sample of the survey respondents. For each re-interview question, the proportion of respondents who give inconsistent responses is evaluated. The "Index of Inconsistency" is used as the measure of response variance. Each question is labelled low, moderate, or high in response variance. In high response variance cases, the questions are put through cognitive testing, and modifications to the question are recommended.

    The Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) sponsored by The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), is also investigated for response error analysis and the possible relationships between inconsistent responses and characteristics of the schools and teachers in that survey. Results of this analysis can be used to change survey procedures and improve data quality.

    Release date: 2002-09-12
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