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All (48) (0 to 10 of 48 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021126392
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of men 55 and over who are no longer active in the labour market, and the "voluntary" or "involuntary" reasons for inactivity.

    Release date: 2002-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036397
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article addresses overqualification, which concerns both workers and employers because people who hold jobs that make few demands on their skills have lower earnings and lower levels of productivity.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002195
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many studies have examined the relative success of immigrant men in the (primarily paid) workforce. Despite the fact that they represent approximately one-sixth of the immigrant workforce, self-employed immigrants are a relatively understudied group. This study uses the 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1996 Census files to assess the success of self-employed immigrant men (compared with self-employed native-born men), using the relative success of paid immigrant men as the benchmark.

    After controlling for various other factors, recent immigrants (those arriving within the last five years) are as likely to be self-employed as the native-born and, over time spent in the country, are more likely to become self-employed. Recent immigrants in the 1990s were far more likely to be self-employed than the native-born. Successive cohorts of recent immigrants have fared progressively worse in the paid labour market compared with paid native-born workers. This is not the case in the self-employed workforce. Although self-employed recent immigrants typically report lower net self-employment income upon entry than the self-employed native-born, the gap has not grown. Instead, it has followed a cyclical movement: narrowing at the peak, and widening in times of weaker economic activity.

    Release date: 2002-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002194
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The wage progression of less skilled workers is of particular policy interest in light of evidence of skill-biased technology changes. There exist two conflicting views regarding the wage progression of less skilled workers. One view believes that work experience is the driving force for wage growth of less skilled workers, so effective policies should encourage workers to participate in the labour market and accumulate work experience. The other view stresses that less skilled workers are usually locked into dead-end jobs in which wages are stagnant and policies that facilitate job shopping (changing jobs and employers) would be desirable.

    Job tenure is a key factor in testing the hypothesis that less skilled workers are locked into dead-end jobs. If the return to tenure is zero, the hypothesis cannot be rejected. An extended human capital model of wage growth for less skilled workers is estimated using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) 1993 to 1998. In order to compare the wage growth mechanisms for workers with different skill endowments, the model is also estimated for workers with higher skill levels. The result implies that the return to job tenure for less skilled workers is significantly different from zero. This is inconsistent with the view that less skilled workers are locked into dead-end jobs.

    The return to job tenure is also found to be greater than the return to total labour market experience for less skilled workers. This finding supports the notion that firm-specific human capital acquired by less skilled workers substitutes for their generally low human capital endowments and the accumulation of firm-specific human capital by less skilled workers greatly improves their earnings prospect.

    Release date: 2002-12-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002002
    Description:

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2001 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) labour interview, including question wording, possible responses and the flow of questions.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002004
    Description:

    This document presents the information for the Entry Exit portion of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) Labour interview.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036379
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Rapid progress in skilled-biased technologies has increased the demand for skilled workers in all countries. The importance of skills for innovation and productivity in Canada is examined in this Industry Canada study.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002181
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We use data from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to address two questions. To what extent do parents and children agree when asked identical questions about child well-being? To what extent do differences in their responses affect what one infers from multivariate analysis of the data? The correspondence between parent and child in the assessment of child well-being is only slight to fair. Agreement is stronger for more observable outcomes, such as schooling performance, and weaker for less observable outcomes, such as emotional disorders. We regress both sets of responses on a standard set of socio-economic characteristics. We also conduct formal and informal tests of the differences in what one would infer from these two sets of regressions.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002182
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    International migration is a joint outcome of the individual's desire to migrate and the host country's selection process. First, the potential migrants apply to a host country, then the host country chooses migrants from the applicant pool. The theoretical focus of the earlier literature was centred on the desire to migrate, while the empirical literature focused on the actual migrants, while migration is the product of these two factors. The objective of this paper is to identify the components of this two-step, decision-making process

    Parameters in the migration model relate directly to policy instruments such as the points awarded for various characteristics. Given the parameter estimates of the model and the general analysis of immigration policy, a study of the factors determining the individual's decision to apply can be done in a way that has not been possible up until now. Using samples of migrants and non-migrants, the model is estimated for migration from two different source countries, the United States and the United Kingdom, to Canada.

    For migrants, a newly available longitudinal data set, the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), has been used. The richness of this database, which surveys immigrants to Canada over a long period and contains information on both their application and subsequent earnings, permits the investigation of a large range of questions that could not be fruitfully addressed before. Estimation of the two-step framework provides important insights on the effects of factors, such as education and income, that help establish this selection process.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002162
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 1976-1999 Canadian Labour Force Survey, we examine the stability of currently held jobs in a manner similar to Diebold, Neumark and Polsky (1997) and Neumark, Polsky and Hansen (1999) who analyzed data from the U.S. Current Population Survey. We find that although the current distribution of in-progress job tenures is filling up with more long jobs, and more shorter jobs - suggesting a polarization of job tenure, the stability of currently held jobs has remained quite stable over the period. A closer look reveals two phases in the Canadian data. The period 1977 to 1993 was characterized by declining job stability. Examining the data by current job tenure, we see a declining stability of short jobs - those less than one year in length were less likely to last one more year in at the end of the 1980s (and beginning of the 1990s) than in the late 1970s. At the same time jobs between one and two years long tended to become more stable - becoming more likely to last one more year by 1993. The second phase - 1993-1999 - was characterized by a reversal of these trends such that by the end of the period, jobs of all lengths were equally as stable as in the late 1970s. Declines across the 1980s in job stability were concentrated in low education, older and younger groups but job stability grew most for these same groups in the 1990s.

    Following U.S. methods allows us to undertake an international comparison. We find that while job stability changes were similar in the two countries between 1987 and 1991, job stability rose relative to the United States between 1991 and 1995. We speculate that this difference is due to a relatively deeper recession in Canada in the early 1990s, and a relatively slow recovery in the mid 1990s.

    Release date: 2002-10-16
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 71-001-P
    Description:

    This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.

    Release date: 2002-08-09

  • 2. Community Profiles Archived
    Profile of a community or region: 93F0053X
    Description:

    The 2001 Community Profiles provide 2001 Census data for close to 6,000 communities, as well as for large and smaller metropolitan areas. These profiles contain free information for all Canadian communities (cities, towns, villages, Indian reserves and settlements, etc.), for counties or their equivalents and for metropolitan areas, as well as data for 2003 health regions. Additional information on data quality, definitions, data quality indexes, special notes and other supporting text is available.

    Release date: 2002-06-27

  • Table: 85-555-X
    Description:

    This report uses census data from 1996 and 1991 to provide a quantitative profile of persons working in justice-related professions in Canada. The profile contains a general description of such characteristics as age, average age, highest level of schooling, average employment income and employment status. Furthermore, it provides detailed information on certain groups for which national data were available. These groups include, women and men, Aboriginal people, visible minorities and immigrants.

    The justice sectors in this report include: police personnel (including : commissioned police officers and police officers), court personnel (including judges, court officers, justices of the peace, court recorders, medical transcriptionists, sheriffs, bailiffs and court clerks), legal personnel (including, lawyers, Quebec notaries, paralegal and related occupations and legal secretaries), probation and parole officers, correctional officers, and other protective service personnel (including: security guards and related occupations, and other protective service occupations).

    Release date: 2002-04-11
Analysis (40)

Analysis (40) (0 to 10 of 40 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021126392
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of men 55 and over who are no longer active in the labour market, and the "voluntary" or "involuntary" reasons for inactivity.

    Release date: 2002-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036397
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article addresses overqualification, which concerns both workers and employers because people who hold jobs that make few demands on their skills have lower earnings and lower levels of productivity.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002195
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many studies have examined the relative success of immigrant men in the (primarily paid) workforce. Despite the fact that they represent approximately one-sixth of the immigrant workforce, self-employed immigrants are a relatively understudied group. This study uses the 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1996 Census files to assess the success of self-employed immigrant men (compared with self-employed native-born men), using the relative success of paid immigrant men as the benchmark.

    After controlling for various other factors, recent immigrants (those arriving within the last five years) are as likely to be self-employed as the native-born and, over time spent in the country, are more likely to become self-employed. Recent immigrants in the 1990s were far more likely to be self-employed than the native-born. Successive cohorts of recent immigrants have fared progressively worse in the paid labour market compared with paid native-born workers. This is not the case in the self-employed workforce. Although self-employed recent immigrants typically report lower net self-employment income upon entry than the self-employed native-born, the gap has not grown. Instead, it has followed a cyclical movement: narrowing at the peak, and widening in times of weaker economic activity.

    Release date: 2002-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002194
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The wage progression of less skilled workers is of particular policy interest in light of evidence of skill-biased technology changes. There exist two conflicting views regarding the wage progression of less skilled workers. One view believes that work experience is the driving force for wage growth of less skilled workers, so effective policies should encourage workers to participate in the labour market and accumulate work experience. The other view stresses that less skilled workers are usually locked into dead-end jobs in which wages are stagnant and policies that facilitate job shopping (changing jobs and employers) would be desirable.

    Job tenure is a key factor in testing the hypothesis that less skilled workers are locked into dead-end jobs. If the return to tenure is zero, the hypothesis cannot be rejected. An extended human capital model of wage growth for less skilled workers is estimated using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) 1993 to 1998. In order to compare the wage growth mechanisms for workers with different skill endowments, the model is also estimated for workers with higher skill levels. The result implies that the return to job tenure for less skilled workers is significantly different from zero. This is inconsistent with the view that less skilled workers are locked into dead-end jobs.

    The return to job tenure is also found to be greater than the return to total labour market experience for less skilled workers. This finding supports the notion that firm-specific human capital acquired by less skilled workers substitutes for their generally low human capital endowments and the accumulation of firm-specific human capital by less skilled workers greatly improves their earnings prospect.

    Release date: 2002-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036379
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Rapid progress in skilled-biased technologies has increased the demand for skilled workers in all countries. The importance of skills for innovation and productivity in Canada is examined in this Industry Canada study.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002181
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We use data from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to address two questions. To what extent do parents and children agree when asked identical questions about child well-being? To what extent do differences in their responses affect what one infers from multivariate analysis of the data? The correspondence between parent and child in the assessment of child well-being is only slight to fair. Agreement is stronger for more observable outcomes, such as schooling performance, and weaker for less observable outcomes, such as emotional disorders. We regress both sets of responses on a standard set of socio-economic characteristics. We also conduct formal and informal tests of the differences in what one would infer from these two sets of regressions.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002182
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    International migration is a joint outcome of the individual's desire to migrate and the host country's selection process. First, the potential migrants apply to a host country, then the host country chooses migrants from the applicant pool. The theoretical focus of the earlier literature was centred on the desire to migrate, while the empirical literature focused on the actual migrants, while migration is the product of these two factors. The objective of this paper is to identify the components of this two-step, decision-making process

    Parameters in the migration model relate directly to policy instruments such as the points awarded for various characteristics. Given the parameter estimates of the model and the general analysis of immigration policy, a study of the factors determining the individual's decision to apply can be done in a way that has not been possible up until now. Using samples of migrants and non-migrants, the model is estimated for migration from two different source countries, the United States and the United Kingdom, to Canada.

    For migrants, a newly available longitudinal data set, the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), has been used. The richness of this database, which surveys immigrants to Canada over a long period and contains information on both their application and subsequent earnings, permits the investigation of a large range of questions that could not be fruitfully addressed before. Estimation of the two-step framework provides important insights on the effects of factors, such as education and income, that help establish this selection process.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002162
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 1976-1999 Canadian Labour Force Survey, we examine the stability of currently held jobs in a manner similar to Diebold, Neumark and Polsky (1997) and Neumark, Polsky and Hansen (1999) who analyzed data from the U.S. Current Population Survey. We find that although the current distribution of in-progress job tenures is filling up with more long jobs, and more shorter jobs - suggesting a polarization of job tenure, the stability of currently held jobs has remained quite stable over the period. A closer look reveals two phases in the Canadian data. The period 1977 to 1993 was characterized by declining job stability. Examining the data by current job tenure, we see a declining stability of short jobs - those less than one year in length were less likely to last one more year in at the end of the 1980s (and beginning of the 1990s) than in the late 1970s. At the same time jobs between one and two years long tended to become more stable - becoming more likely to last one more year by 1993. The second phase - 1993-1999 - was characterized by a reversal of these trends such that by the end of the period, jobs of all lengths were equally as stable as in the late 1970s. Declines across the 1980s in job stability were concentrated in low education, older and younger groups but job stability grew most for these same groups in the 1990s.

    Following U.S. methods allows us to undertake an international comparison. We find that while job stability changes were similar in the two countries between 1987 and 1991, job stability rose relative to the United States between 1991 and 1995. We speculate that this difference is due to a relatively deeper recession in Canada in the early 1990s, and a relatively slow recovery in the mid 1990s.

    Release date: 2002-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Rural areas have a higher incidence of part-time employment. The average annual rate of part-time job growth in rural Canada was higher between 1987 and 1997 than between 1997 and 1999. The predominantly rural provinces have the highest incidence of part-time employment in their rural areas. The majority of part-time employment growth in rural areas is occurring in mainly urban provinces.

    Release date: 2002-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016296
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) is one of Statistics Canada's most important surveys. It is a monthly survey that collects data concerning the person's labour force status, the nature of the person's work or reason for not working, and the person's demographics. The survey sample consists of approximately 52,000 households. Coverage error is a measure of data quality that is important to any survey. One of the key measures of coverage error in the LFS is the percentage difference between the Census of Population estimates and the LFS population counts; this error is called slippage. A negative value indicates that the LFS has a problem of overcoverage, while a positive value indicates the LFS has an undercoverage problem. In general, slippage is positive, thus meaning that the LFS consistently misses people who should be enumerated.

    The purpose of this study was to determine why slippage is increasing and what can be done to remedy it. The study was conducted in two stages. The first stage was a historical review of the projects that have studied and tried to control slippage in the LFS, as well as the operational changes that have been implemented over time. The second stage was an analysis of factors such as vacancy rates, non-response, demographics, urban and rural status and the impact of these factors on the slippage rate.

    Release date: 2002-09-12
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002002
    Description:

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2001 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) labour interview, including question wording, possible responses and the flow of questions.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002004
    Description:

    This document presents the information for the Entry Exit portion of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) Labour interview.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12F0053X
    Description:

    This brochure is intended for anyone interested in a career as a mathematical statistician at Statistics Canada (MA group). It provides an overview of Statistics Canada and the workplace, a description of the type of work done by statisticians, as well as the training and development available to statisticians. It also gives the requirements and a description of the process involved in the annual recruitment of the statisticians (MA group), including the deadline dates for the different steps. Finally, it lists the name, address and phone number of the person in charge of the annual recruitment for the MA program for the given year.

    Release date: 2002-09-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016225
    Description:

    The European Union Labour Forces Survey (LFS) is based on national surveys that were originally very different. For the past decade, under pressure from increasingly demanding users (particularly with respect to timeliness, comparability and flexibility), the LFS has been subjected to a constant process of quality improvement.

    The following topics are presented in this paper:A. the quality improvement process, which comprises screening national survey methods, target structure, legal foundations, quality reports, more accurate and more explicit definitions of components, etc.;B. expected or achieved results, which include an ongoing survey producing quarterly results within reasonable time frames, comparable employment and unemployment rates over time and space in more than 25 countries, specific information on current political topics, etc.;C. continuing shortcomings, such as implementation delays in certain countries, possibilities of longitudinal analysis, public access to microdata, etc.; D. future tasks envisioned, such as adaptation of the list of ISCO and ISCED variables and nomenclatures (to take into account evolution in employment and teaching methods), differential treatment of structural variables and increased recourse to administrative files (to limit respondent burden), harmonization of questionnaires, etc.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-584-G
    Description:

    This book introduces technical aspects of the Statistics Canada Total Work Accounts System (TWAS). The TWAS is designed to facilitate the analysis of issues that require simultaneous consideration of both paid work and unpaid productive work. Its key contribution is to allocate the deemed output of each episode of unpaid work activity to a specific beneficiary or group of beneficiaries (called "destinations"). The guide presents the criteria used to decide the allocation of each work episode to one of the destinations, as well as the pseudo code for DESTIN, the key variable of the System. This pseudo code allows programmers to quickly create the actual programming code needed to derive the DESTIN variable in their own microdata files of diary-based time-use records. The guide also discusses illustrative applications of the System, as well as its key limitations.

    Release date: 2002-02-12
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