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  • Table: 97F0024X2001004
    Description:

    These data tables present 2001 Census highlights on "Mobility Status: 1 Year Ago" and "Mobility Status: 5 Years Ago."

    These tables were available on the official day of release for each of the census topics at various levels of geography. They present information highlights through key indicators, such as 2001 Census counts and percentage distribution. The tables also allow users to perform simple rank and sort functions.

    Release date: 2002-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002195
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many studies have examined the relative success of immigrant men in the (primarily paid) workforce. Despite the fact that they represent approximately one-sixth of the immigrant workforce, self-employed immigrants are a relatively understudied group. This study uses the 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1996 Census files to assess the success of self-employed immigrant men (compared with self-employed native-born men), using the relative success of paid immigrant men as the benchmark.

    After controlling for various other factors, recent immigrants (those arriving within the last five years) are as likely to be self-employed as the native-born and, over time spent in the country, are more likely to become self-employed. Recent immigrants in the 1990s were far more likely to be self-employed than the native-born. Successive cohorts of recent immigrants have fared progressively worse in the paid labour market compared with paid native-born workers. This is not the case in the self-employed workforce. Although self-employed recent immigrants typically report lower net self-employment income upon entry than the self-employed native-born, the gap has not grown. Instead, it has followed a cyclical movement: narrowing at the peak, and widening in times of weaker economic activity.

    Release date: 2002-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002194
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The wage progression of less skilled workers is of particular policy interest in light of evidence of skill-biased technology changes. There exist two conflicting views regarding the wage progression of less skilled workers. One view believes that work experience is the driving force for wage growth of less skilled workers, so effective policies should encourage workers to participate in the labour market and accumulate work experience. The other view stresses that less skilled workers are usually locked into dead-end jobs in which wages are stagnant and policies that facilitate job shopping (changing jobs and employers) would be desirable.

    Job tenure is a key factor in testing the hypothesis that less skilled workers are locked into dead-end jobs. If the return to tenure is zero, the hypothesis cannot be rejected. An extended human capital model of wage growth for less skilled workers is estimated using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) 1993 to 1998. In order to compare the wage growth mechanisms for workers with different skill endowments, the model is also estimated for workers with higher skill levels. The result implies that the return to job tenure for less skilled workers is significantly different from zero. This is inconsistent with the view that less skilled workers are locked into dead-end jobs.

    The return to job tenure is also found to be greater than the return to total labour market experience for less skilled workers. This finding supports the notion that firm-specific human capital acquired by less skilled workers substitutes for their generally low human capital endowments and the accumulation of firm-specific human capital by less skilled workers greatly improves their earnings prospect.

    Release date: 2002-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2002010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication provides a general picture of francophone literacy in Canada and discusses literacy in the context of language transfers to English. It also looks at the process of producing literacy and the literacy training of francophones, while attempting to sort out the impacts that various social and cultural factors have on literacy.

    Release date: 2002-12-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 51F0009X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since September 11, 2001, important changes in the financial and operating statistics of airline activities in Canada have taken place. In particular, most airline companies have seen a deterioration of their financial positions and the number of flights and of seats available have generally decreased while security measures have increased. The aim of this paper is to examine the post-September 11 aviation market in Canada with respect to one key operating characteristic: the number of flights of airline companies operating in Canada. More specifically, the following questions are addressed: Was there a recovery in airline activities in Canada since September 11? Were all losses in all sectors recovered (domestic, transborder and international)? Were all losses at all airports recovered?

    This paper is divided into three sections: 1. Data sources and limitations, the scope of this research and the methodological approach used are described in the first section. 2. The second section highlights the main results obtained and discusses these results in the context of the recent trends in airline activities in Canada. 3. Lastly, some conclusions are offered, based on the evidence collected and analysed.

    Release date: 2002-12-05

  • Table: 95F0302X
    Description:

    This product presents basic counts and totals for all 2001 Census of Agriculture farm variables, including number and type of farms; crop, horticulture and land use areas; land management practices; numbers of livestock and poultry; organic farming; computer use; farm machinery and equipment; farm capital; and farm operating expenses and receipts. It provides a comprehensive picture of the agriculture industry across Canada. It depicts the men and women who make the day-to-day management decisions on Canadian farms. The farm operator variables include number of farm operators, age, sex, residence status, farm and non-farm work and farm-related injuries. This product also presents selected historical farm and farm operator data for Canada and the provinces. The geographic levels presented include Canada, the provinces/territories, census agricultural regions (CAR), census divisions (CD) and the census consolidated subdivisions (CCS). The CCS level is the lowest level of geography available in standard tabulations.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2002060
    Description:

    This research project provides an overview of diversification and specialization in rural regions and communities for the census years 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1996.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002002
    Description:

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2001 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) labour interview, including question wording, possible responses and the flow of questions.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002003
    Description:

    This paper presents the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2001 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) preliminary questionnaire.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002004
    Description:

    This document presents the information for the Entry Exit portion of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) Labour interview.

    Release date: 2002-12-04
Data (184)

Data (184) (30 to 40 of 184 results)

Analysis (309)

Analysis (309) (10 to 20 of 309 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 31F0027M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The intent of this research paper series is to address a variety of topics related to the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole. The papers in this series are based on the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) and focus on the entire manufacturing sector (all 22 major manufacturing groups). Other data sources are used in specific papers. The topics covered include packaging products used by manufacturing industries, evolution of production costs, comparison of establishment groups (ranked by volume of shipments) and stages of processing.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20020087887
    Description:

    Statistics presented are derived from a survey of eight Provincial Research Organizations (PRO): All of these organizations have been established by their respective provincial governments, with a variety of enabling legislation and powers, to provide technical support to primary and secondary industries, to assist in the exploitation of provincial natural resources and to enhance the economy of their provinces. Small and medium-sized companies with limited inhouse technical capability use the services of the provincial research organizations.

    Release date: 2002-12-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 82F0077X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this working paper series is to analyse the comparability of surveys conducted by Statistics Canada on smoking, to highlight the changes in the data among data years and to illustrate their statistical significance. The aim is to clarify any confusion regarding comparability of survey estimates of smoking prevalence and daily cigarette consumption over this period, as well as to provide the user-requested data in a technical but understandable format.

    Release date: 2002-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1996, 17% of Canada's total population were immigrants, and 88% of them were living in urban regions. The three provinces with the largest urban centres attracted most immigrants: 55% went to Ontario, 18% to British Columbia and 13% to Quebec, a pattern that has remained constant for immigrants who have arrived since 1961. The remaining 12% (or 580,000 people) were living in predominantly rural regions. They can be characterized by the period in which they arrived in Canada.

    Recent and new immigrants were better educated than pre-1981 immigrants, particularly in terms of university education. But pre-1981 immigrants had the highest employment rate and were more likely to have professional service occupations than the Canadian-born. Visible minority immigrants fared worse, in socio-economic terms, than non-visible minority immigrants; these differences were more pronounced in predominantly rural regions. The profiles of immigrants in predominantly rural regions were similar to those in predominantly urban regions. However, the few immigrants who resided in rural northern regions had a very different and more favourable profile.

    Release date: 2002-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This theme deals with Canadians'mother tongue and language spoken at home, as well as with their knowledge of English and French. Data from the 2001 Census show, despite an increasingly multilingual Canadian society, that linguistic duality persists. In addition, the theme covers the evolution of English-French bilingualism in the country, and does this for each of the groups that have either English, French or some language other than English or French, as their mother tongue. All of the analyses are done at the province' territory level; some of them are also done at the level of the census metropolitan area.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2002-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Internet report presents the highlights of the mobility and migration data release from the 2001 Census of Population and Housing. Numerous colour maps, charts and tables illustrate the latest interprovincial and intermetropolitan migration trends observed from the published data.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2002-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002195
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many studies have examined the relative success of immigrant men in the (primarily paid) workforce. Despite the fact that they represent approximately one-sixth of the immigrant workforce, self-employed immigrants are a relatively understudied group. This study uses the 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1996 Census files to assess the success of self-employed immigrant men (compared with self-employed native-born men), using the relative success of paid immigrant men as the benchmark.

    After controlling for various other factors, recent immigrants (those arriving within the last five years) are as likely to be self-employed as the native-born and, over time spent in the country, are more likely to become self-employed. Recent immigrants in the 1990s were far more likely to be self-employed than the native-born. Successive cohorts of recent immigrants have fared progressively worse in the paid labour market compared with paid native-born workers. This is not the case in the self-employed workforce. Although self-employed recent immigrants typically report lower net self-employment income upon entry than the self-employed native-born, the gap has not grown. Instead, it has followed a cyclical movement: narrowing at the peak, and widening in times of weaker economic activity.

    Release date: 2002-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002194
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The wage progression of less skilled workers is of particular policy interest in light of evidence of skill-biased technology changes. There exist two conflicting views regarding the wage progression of less skilled workers. One view believes that work experience is the driving force for wage growth of less skilled workers, so effective policies should encourage workers to participate in the labour market and accumulate work experience. The other view stresses that less skilled workers are usually locked into dead-end jobs in which wages are stagnant and policies that facilitate job shopping (changing jobs and employers) would be desirable.

    Job tenure is a key factor in testing the hypothesis that less skilled workers are locked into dead-end jobs. If the return to tenure is zero, the hypothesis cannot be rejected. An extended human capital model of wage growth for less skilled workers is estimated using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) 1993 to 1998. In order to compare the wage growth mechanisms for workers with different skill endowments, the model is also estimated for workers with higher skill levels. The result implies that the return to job tenure for less skilled workers is significantly different from zero. This is inconsistent with the view that less skilled workers are locked into dead-end jobs.

    The return to job tenure is also found to be greater than the return to total labour market experience for less skilled workers. This finding supports the notion that firm-specific human capital acquired by less skilled workers substitutes for their generally low human capital endowments and the accumulation of firm-specific human capital by less skilled workers greatly improves their earnings prospect.

    Release date: 2002-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2002010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication provides a general picture of francophone literacy in Canada and discusses literacy in the context of language transfers to English. It also looks at the process of producing literacy and the literacy training of francophones, while attempting to sort out the impacts that various social and cultural factors have on literacy.

    Release date: 2002-12-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 51F0009X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since September 11, 2001, important changes in the financial and operating statistics of airline activities in Canada have taken place. In particular, most airline companies have seen a deterioration of their financial positions and the number of flights and of seats available have generally decreased while security measures have increased. The aim of this paper is to examine the post-September 11 aviation market in Canada with respect to one key operating characteristic: the number of flights of airline companies operating in Canada. More specifically, the following questions are addressed: Was there a recovery in airline activities in Canada since September 11? Were all losses in all sectors recovered (domestic, transborder and international)? Were all losses at all airports recovered?

    This paper is divided into three sections: 1. Data sources and limitations, the scope of this research and the methodological approach used are described in the first section. 2. The second section highlights the main results obtained and discusses these results in the context of the recent trends in airline activities in Canada. 3. Lastly, some conclusions are offered, based on the evidence collected and analysed.

    Release date: 2002-12-05
Reference (56)

Reference (56) (0 to 10 of 56 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 21-601-M2002061
    Description:

    This paper compares six definitions of the word 'rural' from databases at Statistics Canada. Each definition emphasizes different criteria (population size, density, context) and has different associated thresholds. The size of the territorial units (building blocks) from which each definition is constructed also varies.

    Release date: 2002-12-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 64F0004X
    Description:

    This practical and informative guide for the construction industry will assist in navigating through numerous Statistics Canada products and services.

    Release date: 2002-12-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via paper questionnaires and personal interviews conducted in January, February and March after the reference year. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces and the 3 territories. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2002-12-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002002
    Description:

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2001 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) labour interview, including question wording, possible responses and the flow of questions.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002003
    Description:

    This paper presents the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2001 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) preliminary questionnaire.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002004
    Description:

    This document presents the information for the Entry Exit portion of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) Labour interview.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-547-X
    Description:

    Like most statistical agencies, Statistics Canada publishes three Gross Domestic Product (GDP) series. These are the output-based GDP, the income-based GDP and the expenditure-based GDP. This document is aimed at describing the concepts, definitions, classifications and statistical methods underlying the output-based GDP series, also known as GDP by industry or simply monthly GDP.

    The report is organized into seven chapters. Chapter 1 defines what GDP by industry is, describes its various uses and how it connects with the other components of the Canadian System of National Accounts. Chapter 2 deals with the calculation of the GDP by industry estimates. Chapter 3 examines industry and commodity classification schemes. Chapter 4 discusses the subject of deflation. The choice of deflators, the role of the base year and the method of rebasing are all addressed in this chapter. Chapter 5 looks at such technical issues as benchmarking, trading day and seasonal adjustment. Chapter 6 is devoted to the presentation of the GDP by industry, detailing the format, release dates and modes of dissemination, as well as the need and the frequency of revising the estimates. Finally, Chapter 7 reviews the historical development of monthly GDP from 1926 to the present.

    Release date: 2002-11-29

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0170G
    Description:

    The Forward Sortation Areas Boundary File Reference Guide is available for the following product: Forward Sortation Areas Boundary File (Catalogue no. 92F0170XCE). The reference guide describes the content and applications of these products, as well as data quality, record layouts and other information.

    Release date: 2002-11-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2002006
    Description:

    This user's guide provides a detailed description of the CD-ROM Income trends in Canada (Catalogue no. 13F0022XCB). It also provides a glossary and a description of the major concepts, as well as an overview of the data source, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2002-11-19

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20020048523
    Description:

    The Provincial Economic Accounts will adopt the Fisher Volume Index, chained annually, as the official measure of real expenditure-based GDP. This change will be incorporated into the affected series back to 1981.

    Release date: 2002-11-07
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