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  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20000057925
    Description:

    This Bulletin provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 2000-2001. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of the science and technology (S&T) activities of Federal departments and agencies. According to international convention, S&T is divided into two fields; Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) and Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH). These fields of science are further divided into Research and Development (R&D) and Related Scientific Activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2000-11-23

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20000047926
    Description:

    Statistics presented are derived from a survey of nine Provincial Research Organizations (PRO): the InNOVAcorp (formerly the Nova Scotia Research Foundation Corporation), the New Brunswick Research and Productivity Council, the "Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (CRIQ)", the Industrial Technology Centre (Manitoba) (formerly the Economic Innovation and Technology Council), the Saskatchewan Research Council, the Alberta Research Council, the Yukon Research Institute, the NUNAVUT Research Institute (formerly the Science Institute of the Northwest Territories) and the Aurora Research Institute.

    Release date: 2000-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000025118
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The number of personnel in scientific and technological (S&T) activities in the federal government has declined by 15% since 1990-1991.

    Release date: 2000-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000025124
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The federal government is an essential player S&T activities in Canada in which it invests over five billion dollars each year. In addition to this direct investment, an additional $1.3 billion of assistance is provided through the federal R&D tax incentive program. This article examines regional differences in science and technology tax regimes in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-06-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0031M2000002
    Description:

    This paper deals with a problem in internationally comparable economic statistics, namely, the fact that countries measure value added by industry differently. The economic measure, value added, is important both in its own right and because it is a component of other economic measures such as productivity. Value added by industry measures the additional value created by a production process. This additional value, created by factors of production such as labour and capital, may be calculated either before or after deducting the consumption of fixed capital used in production. Thus, gross value added by industry is the value of its output of goods and services less the value of its intermediate consumption of goods and services and net value added as the value of output less the values of both intermediate consumption and consumption of fixed capital.

    Release date: 2000-04-04

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20000017929
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents federal government personnel (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE*) engaged in S&T activities. Data on federal government expenditures on S&T are found in Volume 23, No. 5 of this publication.

    Release date: 2000-03-17
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  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20000057925
    Description:

    This Bulletin provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 2000-2001. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of the science and technology (S&T) activities of Federal departments and agencies. According to international convention, S&T is divided into two fields; Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) and Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH). These fields of science are further divided into Research and Development (R&D) and Related Scientific Activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2000-11-23

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20000047926
    Description:

    Statistics presented are derived from a survey of nine Provincial Research Organizations (PRO): the InNOVAcorp (formerly the Nova Scotia Research Foundation Corporation), the New Brunswick Research and Productivity Council, the "Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (CRIQ)", the Industrial Technology Centre (Manitoba) (formerly the Economic Innovation and Technology Council), the Saskatchewan Research Council, the Alberta Research Council, the Yukon Research Institute, the NUNAVUT Research Institute (formerly the Science Institute of the Northwest Territories) and the Aurora Research Institute.

    Release date: 2000-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000025118
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The number of personnel in scientific and technological (S&T) activities in the federal government has declined by 15% since 1990-1991.

    Release date: 2000-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000025124
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The federal government is an essential player S&T activities in Canada in which it invests over five billion dollars each year. In addition to this direct investment, an additional $1.3 billion of assistance is provided through the federal R&D tax incentive program. This article examines regional differences in science and technology tax regimes in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-06-01

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20000017929
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents federal government personnel (Full-Time Equivalent - FTE*) engaged in S&T activities. Data on federal government expenditures on S&T are found in Volume 23, No. 5 of this publication.

    Release date: 2000-03-17
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0031M2000002
    Description:

    This paper deals with a problem in internationally comparable economic statistics, namely, the fact that countries measure value added by industry differently. The economic measure, value added, is important both in its own right and because it is a component of other economic measures such as productivity. Value added by industry measures the additional value created by a production process. This additional value, created by factors of production such as labour and capital, may be calculated either before or after deducting the consumption of fixed capital used in production. Thus, gross value added by industry is the value of its output of goods and services less the value of its intermediate consumption of goods and services and net value added as the value of output less the values of both intermediate consumption and consumption of fixed capital.

    Release date: 2000-04-04
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