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  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20000047926
    Description:

    Statistics presented are derived from a survey of nine Provincial Research Organizations (PRO): the InNOVAcorp (formerly the Nova Scotia Research Foundation Corporation), the New Brunswick Research and Productivity Council, the "Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (CRIQ)", the Industrial Technology Centre (Manitoba) (formerly the Economic Innovation and Technology Council), the Saskatchewan Research Council, the Alberta Research Council, the Yukon Research Institute, the NUNAVUT Research Institute (formerly the Science Institute of the Northwest Territories) and the Aurora Research Institute.

    Release date: 2000-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2000004
    Description:

    Businesses have embraced the use of information and communications technologies such as e-mail, and the Internet and the personal computer or PC are widely used in most businesses. Use of computers among enterprises was high at 81.9%. The Internet, originally designed as a communications medium for researchers, is now being adopted by many other groups. The Internet was used by 52.8% of enterprises and these enterprises accounted for three-quarters of economic activity.

    The proportion of enterprises with Web sites was 21.7% and these enterprises account for 44.8% of economic activity for the private sector. Among other uses, the Internet was used to purchase goods and services by 13.8% of enterprises and by 10.1% to sell goods and services. Significant variation exists in the levels of information and communications technologies use across industries.

    The public sector is a model user of information and communications technologies. The proportion of institutions in public health, education, and federal and provincial governments using the Internet and e-mail, and having Internet Web sites is significantly higher than it is for the private sector. Over 95 % of institutions in the public sector use the Internet, 96.6% use e-mail and 69.2% have an Internet Web site.

    The volume of Internet-based sales reported was $4.4 billion, of which $4.2 billion was for the private sector and $200 million for the public sector. Total private sector Internet based sales accounted for 0.2% of economic activity in terms of total operating revenue.

    For non-Internet users the most important reason for not using the Internet to purchase or sell goods or services was the belief that their goods or services do not lend themselves to concluding transactions over the Internet. Among Internet users, the most popular reason given for not using the Internet to purchase or sell was that they prefer to maintain their current business model.

    Release date: 2000-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20000025358
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article compares the characteristics of the 10 largest independent film and video producers, as measured by production revenues, with all the others, over a 10-year period starting in 1988/89.

    Release date: 2000-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20000025361
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The economy was strong in 1999 and while consumers were interested in big-ticket items such as automobiles in the first quarter of the year their attention turned to services later in the year.

    Release date: 2000-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20000025362
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canadians exhibited a dramatic shift in their sport participation rate from 1992 to 1998. According to the latest information released from Statistics Canada's General Social Survey (GSS), fewer Canadians aged 15 years and older reported participating in a sport in 1998 than six years earlier (down almost 11 percentage points).

    Release date: 2000-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000108383
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 1999, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the third time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1993 and 1988.

    For the 1999 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 26,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked for their opinions concerning the level of crime in their neighbourhood, their fear of crime and their views concerning the performance of the justice system. They were also asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat presents an overview of the findings of the 1999 General Social Survey and makes comparisons to results from 1993 and 1988.

    Release date: 2000-11-02

  • Table: 74-401-S
    Description:

    Retirement issues have risen to the forefront of socio-economic debate in Canada through the nineties and will likely gain importance as we enter the new millennium. Employer pension plans are one of the primary programs in place to provide workers with income after retirement.

    Pension plans in Canada: statistical highlights and key tables presents information on the terms, conditions and membership on all employers sponsored pension plans in Canada. This supplement to publication Pension plans in Canada (74-401-XIB) provides analysis and data on registered pension plans. The topics covered include province of employment, labour force/paid workers coverage, type of plan (defined benefit and defined contributions), size of plan, public and private sectors, contributory and non-contributory plans, employee and employer contributions.

    Release date: 2000-10-31

  • Table: 15-203-X
    Description:

    This publication presents current and constant price estimates of provincial gross domestic product (GDP) for over 50 industries covering the entire Canadian economy, including aggregates and special industry groupings. The document also includes a comprehensive analytical review of the economy of each province and territory with summary text, tables and charts.

    Release date: 2000-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20000025331
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at the fast-growing Computer Services industry in Canada, with a particular focus on software developers, data processing firms, systems consultants, and Internet service providers.

    Release date: 2000-10-26

  • 40. Teenage pregnancy Archived
    Articles and reports: 82-003-X20000015299
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines trends in teenage pregnancy in Canada, focussing on induced abortions, live births and fetal loss among women aged 15 to 19 in 1997.

    Release date: 2000-10-20
Data (41)

Data (41) (20 to 30 of 41 results)

  • Table: 74-201-X
    Description:

    This publication presents information on the income, expenditure and assets of all trusteed pension funds in Canada in both the public and private sectors. Data are presented at the Canada level. The publication contains an analysis of the funds based on the size of the fund, the number of members and the type of benefit. It is a continuation of a series of reports produced since 1957. As a single pool of investment capital in Canada, these funds are surpassed in size only by the aggregate reserves held by the chartered banks.

    Release date: 2000-07-17

  • Table: 16F0009X
    Description:

    Often identified as an emerging sector, the environment industry continues to evolve into a complex industry that offers a wide range of technologies and services aimed at protecting the environment and improving environmental quality. This paper analyses Canada's trade in environmental goods and services and compares it with the trade profile of the world's largest environmental market, the United States. What is Canada's trade balance among the different segments of the environment industry? What are the market drivers for environmental goods and services? The relevance of this research is magnified by the current focus on environmental technologies and their key sub-sectors such as climate change technologies, water and wastewater systems and hazardous waste management. The government recently identified these sectors as targeted growth areas for Canada.

    Release date: 2000-07-14

  • Table: 50-002-X20000025103
    Description:

    The ports handled a total of 274.3 million tonnes (Mt.) of cargo. Strong increases in domestic shipments, particularly in the forest sector were sufficient to offset a decline in international shipments, which were strongly affected by a decrease in iron ore shipments to US ports.

    Release date: 2000-07-12

  • Table: 50-002-X20000025104
    Description:

    For the Canadian bus industry as a whole, the first six months of 1999 produced marginal financial improvements over the same months of the previous year. Gross revenues excluding subsidies grew by just over one half of one percent, rising from $1.58 billion in 1998 to $1.59 billion in 1999. Expenditures decreased slightly from $2.38 billion for the first two quarters of 1998 to $2.37 billion in 1999.

    Release date: 2000-07-12

  • 25. Cable Television Archived
    Table: 56-205-X
    Description:

    This online publication presents detailed annual financial and operating statistics on the Canadian cable television industry. Operational data are published on subscribers, households passed by cable, kilometres of cable, channel capacity and program hours. Financial statistics include detailed revenue and expense accounts, balance sheet and statement of retained earnings. The preamble to the publication consists of statistical highlights, a written analysis and text tables which display a financial and operating summary of the cable television industry. Also included is a glossary of terms for the industry.

    Release date: 2000-06-21

  • Table: 15-546-X
    Description:

    This publication analyses interprovincial and international trade flows with provincial highlights enhanced by charts, contains tables that illustrate: how trade has evolved annually from 1992 to 1998; the types of goods and services traded; and, developments of economic linkages among the provinces.

    Release date: 2000-06-07

  • Table: 53F0002X
    Description:

    Nearly 50,000 or one in five (22%) Canadian truck drivers on the road in 1998 were independent truckers or "owner-operators". However, similar to other forms of self-employment, the net-earnings and socio-economic characteristics of owner-operators have often been ignored by researchers for reasons of analytical convenience or data limitations. New data products recently released by Statistics Canada such as the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) have the potential to fill much of this gap. The 1997 SLID cross-sectional micro-data files offer a limited but meaningful insight into the work patterns of the owner-operator population, complementing and validating well-established business surveys such as the annual Small for-hire carrier and Owner-operator Survey (SFO). The purpose of this study, through a multivariate analysis of the 1997 SLID and the 1997 SFO survey, was to compare the work patterns and backgrounds of owner-operators to company drivers (paid truck drivers employed by carriers). The study found that while drivers may choose to be self-employed to gain independence, owner-operators tend to work longer hours to meet fixed and variable costs, in return for lower after-tax earnings and a greater likelihood of high work-life stress. The analysis also found that the odds of self-employment among truckers were highest among drivers over 40 years of age with no post-secondary training.

    Release date: 2000-06-07

  • Table: 63-204-X
    Description:

    Statistics on hotels, motels, tourist camping grounds and other types of traveller accommodation (e.g., receipts, employment, expenses, occupancy) are provided in this publication. Also included are definitions, methodology, and notes on data quality.

    Release date: 2000-06-07

  • Table: 61F0027X
    Description:

    Sub-provincial employment dynamics uses longitudinal data to produce year-to-year changes in the number of employer businesses, employment and payrolls in Canada. Changes are shown by size of business and by business life status, which includes entry, exit, growth and decline.

    Release date: 2000-06-02

  • Table: 98-187-X
    Description:

    Censuses of Canada, 1665 to 1871, Statistics of Canada, Volume IV was printed in Ottawa, in 1876, from the Censuses of Canada, 1870-71. This volume contains about 343 statistical tables on the social and economic conditions in Canada from the earliest settlements to Confederation and onto 1871. The results from 98 censuses are arranged in chronological order, with some explanatory notes. In most cases, there are sufficient descriptions of the individual series to enable the reader to use them without consulting the numerous basic sources referenced in the publication.

    An electronic version of this historical publication is accessible on the Internet site of Statistics Canada. The Introduction is a free downloadable document in text as HTML pages for on-line viewing and Adobe Acrobat (PDF) files for printing. The statistical tables are available through E-STAT* (which allows both on-line viewing and downloading).

    Release date: 2000-05-26
Analysis (235)

Analysis (235) (0 to 10 of 235 results)

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20000087922
    Description:

    This release provides data on the Research and development activities of the private non-profit sector. Although the contribution of this sector to the national R&D effort is small in dollar terms, its impact, particularly in the university sector, is significant.Questionnaires were mailed to 94 private non-profit organizations thought to be supporting Research and development activities. Twenty organizations reported performing Research and development.

    Release date: 2000-12-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-573-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The international Adult Literacy Survey of 1994 is an important source of information about the literacy levels of Canadians as well as the factors that can explain the disparities between certain sub-populations. The current study shows and tries to explain some of the disparities between Francophones and Anglophones in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-12-22

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20000077923
    Description:

    The higher education sector is composed of "all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of post-secondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status. It also includes all research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of, or administered by, or associated with higher education establishments."

    Release date: 2000-12-21

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20000067924
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) represents total R&D expenditures performed in a country's national territory during a given year. GERD includes research and development performed within a country and funded from abroad but excludes payments sent abroad for research and development performed in other countries.

    Release date: 2000-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000138386
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of residential, business and 'other' break and enter (B & E) offences in Canada, including trends at the national, provincial and metropolitan area levels, as well as characteristics of B & E incidents, accused persons and victims. In addition the offence known as "home invasion" is also discussed. Data are examined from both the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) survey and the General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization. Data from both youth and adult court are examined to look at the types of sentences being given to persons convicted of B & E offences.

    Release date: 2000-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2000008
    Description:

    This paper attempts to quantify the magnitude of economic disparity among Canadian provinces. It uses the average annual earning of a province as an indicator of economic well-being for that province.

    Release date: 2000-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000160
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this paper, we use census tract data to analyse changes in neighbourhood income inequality and residential economic segregation in the eight largest Canadian cities during the 1980-95 period. Is the income gap between richer and poorer neighbourhoods rising? Are high and low-income families increasingly clustered in economically homogeneous neighbourhoods? The main results are an elaboration of the spatial implications of the well documented changes that have occurred in family income and earnings inequality since 1980. We find that between neighbourhood family income (post-transfer/pre-tax) inequality rose in all cities driven by a substantial rise in neighbourhood (employment) earnings inequality. Real average earnings fell, sometimes dramatically, in low-income neighbourhoods in virtually all cities while rising moderately in higher income neighbourhoods. Strikingly, social transfers, which were the main factor stabilizing national level income inequality in the face of rising earnings inequality, had only a modest impact on changes in neighbourhood inequality. Changes in the neighbourhood distribution of earnings signal significant change in the social and economic character of many neighbourhoods. Employment was increasingly concentrated in higher income communities and unemployment in lower income neighbourhoods. Finally, we ask whether neighbourhood inequality rose primarily as a result of rising family income inequality in the city as a whole or because families were increasingly sorting themselves into "like" neighbourhoods so that neighbourhoods were becoming more economically homogeneous (economic "segregation"). We find that economic spatial segregation increased in all cities and was the major factor behind rising neighbourhood inequality in four of the eight cities. A general rise in urban family income inequality was the main factor in the remaining four cities.

    Release date: 2000-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2000001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Historically, female employment rates in rural areas have been significantly below the rates for women in urban areas (Bollman, 1991; Fuguitt, Brown and Beale, 1989). The objective of this paper is to explore some of the factors associated with these rural-urban differences in female employment rates.

    Release date: 2000-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2000033
    Description:

    Based on 1997 results from the Traveller Accommodation Survey, it profiles Canada's hotels and motor hotels industry. Relative measures of the industry's characteristics, performance and workforce are presented with some information specific to small, medium, and large-sized establishments. The data indicate that, for a variety of reasons, large-sized hotels and motor hotels outperform other establishments in the industry.

    Release date: 2000-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000035386
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at Canadians' incomes and expeditures in the 20th century.

    Release date: 2000-12-12
Reference (59)

Reference (59) (0 to 10 of 59 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2000005
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces and three territories. (The three territories are surveyed every second year.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables and descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2000-12-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85-602-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of existing methods and techniques making use of personal identifiers to support record linkage. Record linkage can be loosely defined as a methodology for manipulating and / or transforming personal identifiers from individual data records from one or more operational databases and subsequently attempting to match these personal identifiers to create a composite record about an individual. Record linkage is not intended to uniquely identify individuals for operational purposes; however, it does provide probabilistic matches of varying degrees of reliability for use in statistical reporting. Techniques employed in record linkage may also be of use for investigative purposes to help narrow the field of search against existing databases when some form of personal identification information exists.

    Release date: 2000-12-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 21-525-X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada publishes several measures of farm income, each produced for a different purpose. This bulletin describes the concepts behind these different measures, the methods by which the measures are constructed, and the uses for which they were designed.

    Release date: 2000-11-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 82-573-G
    Description:

    The Guide to health statistics leads to health-related information with links to vital statistics such as births, deaths, marriages and divorces, to cancer statistics, health determinants, health status, health care, smoking and tobacco use and more. There is also information on cross-sectional and longitudinal surveys from the Canadian Community Health Survey and the National Population Health Survey.

    This user's guide has been developed by Health Statistics Division to facilitate access on health information at Statistics Canada. It includes information with links to products and programs from Health Statistics Division, other divisions at Statistics Canada and other health related programs outside Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2000-10-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2000005
    Description:

    This paper describes the collection method and content of the 1999 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income interview.

    Release date: 2000-10-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85-510-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication includes a list of federal and provincial courts across the country. The purpose of this directory is to identify all courts (permanent and most frequently visited circuit points) in Canada by type, level, and location.

    Release date: 2000-09-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2000011
    Description:

    This report summarizes the comments received in response to a discussion paper on low income cut-offs released in January 2000.

    Release date: 2000-09-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0010X
    Description:

    The publication guides the user through the vast array of labour market and income data sources. It offers detailed descriptions of the various surveys, including the data collected. A summary chart gives snapshot information for comparisons.

    Release date: 2000-09-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X20000015176
    Description:

    A components-of-variance approach and an estimated covariance error structure were used in constructing predictors of adjustment factors for the 1990 Decennial Census. The variability of the estimated covariance matrix is the suspected cause of certain anomalies that appeared in the regression estimation and in the estimated adjustment factors. We investigate alternative prediction methods and propose a procedure that is less influenced by variability in the estimated covariance matrix. The proposed methodology is applied to a data set composed of 336 adjustment factors from the 1990 Post Enumeration Survey.

    Release date: 2000-08-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X20000015177
    Description:

    The 1996 Canadian Census is adjusted for coverage error as estimated primarily through the Reverse Record Check (RRC). In this paper, we will show how there is a wealth of additional information from the 1996 Reverse Record Check of direct value to population estimation. Beyond its ability to estimate coverage error, it is possible to extend the Reverse Record Check classification results to obtain an alternative estimate of demographic growth - potentially decomposed by component. This added feature of the Reverse Record Check provides promise in the evaluation of estimated census coverage error as well as insight as to possible problems in the estimation of selected components in the population estimates program.

    Release date: 2000-08-30
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