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All (220) (0 to 10 of 220 results)

  • Public use microdata: 71F0001X
    Description:

    The demographic and labour market activity information that is in the Labour Market Activity Survey (LMAS) is now available on compact disk. The files contain all the important demographic variables such as province, age, sex, marital status, education, visible minority membership, disability and immigration status for 60,000 persons each year representing the Canadian population from 1986 to 1990. They contain information about the jobs people held: type of activity, schedules, wages, earnings, unionization, pension coverage, and self-employment. There is also information about unemployment spells, unpaid absences, training and schooling, sources of income and some family characteristics. Any of the variables can be combined with others to create a virtually unlimited number of tables for analysis.

    The three disks contain seven separate files and each file contains about 60,000 samples of individuals. Five different samples represent the annual populations, 1986 to 1990; one file contains 1986-87 two year histories for a sample of individuals, and a second file contains 1988-1990 three year histories for another sample of individuals.

    Release date: 1993-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214452
    Description:

    Surveys across time can serve many objectives. The first half of the paper reviews the abilities of alternative survey designs across time - repeated surveys, panel surveys, rotating panel surveys and split panel surveys - to meet these objectives. The second half concentrates on panel surveys. It discusses the decisions that need to be made in designing a panel survey, the problems of wave nonresponse, time-in-sample bias and the seam effect, and some methods for the longitudinal analysis of panel survey data.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214453
    Description:

    A generalized concept is presented for all of the commonly used methods of forest sampling. The concept views the forest as a two-dimensional picture which is cut up into pieces like a jigsaw puzzle, with the pieces defined by the individual selection probabilities of the trees in the forest. This concept results in a finite number of independently selected sample units, in contrast to every other generalized conceptualization of forest sampling presented to date.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214454
    Description:

    This study covers such imperfect frames in which no population unit has been excluded from the frame but an unspecified number of population units may have been included in the list an unspecified number of times each with a separate identification. When the availability of auxiliary information on any unit in the imperfect frame is not assumed, it is established that for estimation of a population ratio or a mean, the mean square errors of estimators based on the imperfect frame are less than those based on the perfect frame for simple random sampling when the sampling fractions of perfect and imperfect frames are the same. For estimation of a population total, however, this is not always true. Also, there are situations in which estimators of a ratio, a mean or a total based on smaller sampling fraction from imperfect frame can have smaller mean square error than those based on a larger sampling fraction from the perfect frame.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214455
    Description:

    Post-stratification is a common technique for improving precision of estimators by using data items not available at the design stage of a survey. In large, complex samples, the vector of Horvitz-Thompson estimators of survey target variables and of post-stratum population sizes will, under appropriate conditions, be approximately multivariate normal. This large sample normality leads to a new post-stratified regression estimator, which is analogous to the linear regression estimator in simple random sampling. We derive the large sample design bias and mean squared errors of this new estimator, the standard post-stratified estimator, the Horvitz-Thompson estimator, and a ratio estimator. We use both real and artificial populations to study empirically the conditional and unconditional properties of the estimators in multistage sampling.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214456
    Description:

    This study is based on the use of superpopulation models to anticipate, before data collection, the variance of a measure by ratio sampling. The method, based on models that are both simple and fairly realistic, produces expressions of varying complexity and then optimizes them, in some cases rigorously, in others approximately. The solution to the final problem discussed points up a rarely considered factor in sample design optimization: the cost related to collecting individual information.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214457
    Description:

    The maximum likelihood estimation of a non-linear benchmarking model, proposed by Laniel and Fyfe (1989; 1990), is considered. This model takes into account the biases and sampling errors associated with the original series. Since the maximum likelihood estimators of the model parameters are not obtainable in closed forms, two iterative procedures to find the maximum likelihood estimates are discussed. The closed form expressions for the asymptotic variances and covariances of the benchmarked series, and of the fitted values are also provided. The methodology is illustrated using published Canadian retail trade data.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214458
    Description:

    In this article we report the results of fitting a state-space model to Canadian unemployment rates. The model assumes an additive decomposition of the population values into a trend, seasonal and irregular component and separate autoregressive relationships for the six survey error series corresponding to the six monthly panel estimators. The model includes rotation group effects and permits the design variances of the survey errors to change over time. The model is fitted at the small area level but it accounts for correlations between the component series of different areas. The robustness of estimators obtained under the model is achieved by imposing the constraint that the monthly aggregate model based estimators in a group of small areas for which the total sample size is sufficiently large coincide with the corresponding direct survey estimators. The performance of the model when fitted to the Atlantic provinces is assessed by a variety of diagnostic statistics and residual plots and by comparisons with estimators in current use.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214459
    Description:

    Record linkage is the matching of records containing data on individuals, businesses or dwellings when a unique identifier is not available. Methods used in practice involve classification of record pairs as links and non-links using an automated procedure based on the theoretical framework introduced by Fellegi and Sunter (1969). The estimation of classification error rates is an important issue. Fellegi and Sunter provide a method for calculation of classification error rate estimates as a direct by-product of linkage. These model-based estimates are easier to produce than the estimates based on manual matching of samples that are typically used in practice. Properties of model-based classification error rate estimates obtained using three estimators of model parameters are compared.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214460
    Description:

    Methods for estimating response bias in surveys require “unbiased” remeasurements for at least a subsample of observations. The usual estimator of response bias is the difference between the mean of the original observations and the mean of the unbiased observations. In this article, we explore a number of alternative estimators of response bias derived from a model prediction approach. The assumed sampling design is a stratified two-phase design implementing simple random sampling in each phase. We assume that the characteristic, y, is observed for each unit selected in phase 1 while the true value of the characteristic, \mu, is obtained for each unit in the subsample selected at phase 2. We further assume that an auxiliary variable x is known for each unit in the phase 1 sample and that the population total of x is known. A number of models relating y, \mu and x are assumed which yield alternative estimators of E (y - \mu), the response bias. The estimators are evaluated using a bootstrap procedure for estimating variance, bias, and mean squared error. Our bootstrap procedure is an extension of the Bickel-Freedman single phase method to the case of a stratified two-phase design. As an illustration, the methodology is applied to data from the National Agricultural Statistics Service reinterview program. For these data, we show that the usual difference estimator is outperformed by the model-assisted estimator suggested by Särndal, Swensson and Wretman (1991), thus indicating that improvements over the traditional estimator are possible using the model prediction approach.

    Release date: 1993-12-15
Data (170)

Data (170) (0 to 10 of 170 results)

Analysis (46)

Analysis (46) (0 to 10 of 46 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214452
    Description:

    Surveys across time can serve many objectives. The first half of the paper reviews the abilities of alternative survey designs across time - repeated surveys, panel surveys, rotating panel surveys and split panel surveys - to meet these objectives. The second half concentrates on panel surveys. It discusses the decisions that need to be made in designing a panel survey, the problems of wave nonresponse, time-in-sample bias and the seam effect, and some methods for the longitudinal analysis of panel survey data.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214453
    Description:

    A generalized concept is presented for all of the commonly used methods of forest sampling. The concept views the forest as a two-dimensional picture which is cut up into pieces like a jigsaw puzzle, with the pieces defined by the individual selection probabilities of the trees in the forest. This concept results in a finite number of independently selected sample units, in contrast to every other generalized conceptualization of forest sampling presented to date.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214454
    Description:

    This study covers such imperfect frames in which no population unit has been excluded from the frame but an unspecified number of population units may have been included in the list an unspecified number of times each with a separate identification. When the availability of auxiliary information on any unit in the imperfect frame is not assumed, it is established that for estimation of a population ratio or a mean, the mean square errors of estimators based on the imperfect frame are less than those based on the perfect frame for simple random sampling when the sampling fractions of perfect and imperfect frames are the same. For estimation of a population total, however, this is not always true. Also, there are situations in which estimators of a ratio, a mean or a total based on smaller sampling fraction from imperfect frame can have smaller mean square error than those based on a larger sampling fraction from the perfect frame.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214455
    Description:

    Post-stratification is a common technique for improving precision of estimators by using data items not available at the design stage of a survey. In large, complex samples, the vector of Horvitz-Thompson estimators of survey target variables and of post-stratum population sizes will, under appropriate conditions, be approximately multivariate normal. This large sample normality leads to a new post-stratified regression estimator, which is analogous to the linear regression estimator in simple random sampling. We derive the large sample design bias and mean squared errors of this new estimator, the standard post-stratified estimator, the Horvitz-Thompson estimator, and a ratio estimator. We use both real and artificial populations to study empirically the conditional and unconditional properties of the estimators in multistage sampling.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214456
    Description:

    This study is based on the use of superpopulation models to anticipate, before data collection, the variance of a measure by ratio sampling. The method, based on models that are both simple and fairly realistic, produces expressions of varying complexity and then optimizes them, in some cases rigorously, in others approximately. The solution to the final problem discussed points up a rarely considered factor in sample design optimization: the cost related to collecting individual information.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214457
    Description:

    The maximum likelihood estimation of a non-linear benchmarking model, proposed by Laniel and Fyfe (1989; 1990), is considered. This model takes into account the biases and sampling errors associated with the original series. Since the maximum likelihood estimators of the model parameters are not obtainable in closed forms, two iterative procedures to find the maximum likelihood estimates are discussed. The closed form expressions for the asymptotic variances and covariances of the benchmarked series, and of the fitted values are also provided. The methodology is illustrated using published Canadian retail trade data.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214458
    Description:

    In this article we report the results of fitting a state-space model to Canadian unemployment rates. The model assumes an additive decomposition of the population values into a trend, seasonal and irregular component and separate autoregressive relationships for the six survey error series corresponding to the six monthly panel estimators. The model includes rotation group effects and permits the design variances of the survey errors to change over time. The model is fitted at the small area level but it accounts for correlations between the component series of different areas. The robustness of estimators obtained under the model is achieved by imposing the constraint that the monthly aggregate model based estimators in a group of small areas for which the total sample size is sufficiently large coincide with the corresponding direct survey estimators. The performance of the model when fitted to the Atlantic provinces is assessed by a variety of diagnostic statistics and residual plots and by comparisons with estimators in current use.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214459
    Description:

    Record linkage is the matching of records containing data on individuals, businesses or dwellings when a unique identifier is not available. Methods used in practice involve classification of record pairs as links and non-links using an automated procedure based on the theoretical framework introduced by Fellegi and Sunter (1969). The estimation of classification error rates is an important issue. Fellegi and Sunter provide a method for calculation of classification error rate estimates as a direct by-product of linkage. These model-based estimates are easier to produce than the estimates based on manual matching of samples that are typically used in practice. Properties of model-based classification error rate estimates obtained using three estimators of model parameters are compared.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199300214460
    Description:

    Methods for estimating response bias in surveys require “unbiased” remeasurements for at least a subsample of observations. The usual estimator of response bias is the difference between the mean of the original observations and the mean of the unbiased observations. In this article, we explore a number of alternative estimators of response bias derived from a model prediction approach. The assumed sampling design is a stratified two-phase design implementing simple random sampling in each phase. We assume that the characteristic, y, is observed for each unit selected in phase 1 while the true value of the characteristic, \mu, is obtained for each unit in the subsample selected at phase 2. We further assume that an auxiliary variable x is known for each unit in the phase 1 sample and that the population total of x is known. A number of models relating y, \mu and x are assumed which yield alternative estimators of E (y - \mu), the response bias. The estimators are evaluated using a bootstrap procedure for estimating variance, bias, and mean squared error. Our bootstrap procedure is an extension of the Bickel-Freedman single phase method to the case of a stratified two-phase design. As an illustration, the methodology is applied to data from the National Agricultural Statistics Service reinterview program. For these data, we show that the usual difference estimator is outperformed by the model-assisted estimator suggested by Särndal, Swensson and Wretman (1991), thus indicating that improvements over the traditional estimator are possible using the model prediction approach.

    Release date: 1993-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X1993004110
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's 'Mr. Pensions' discusses retirement issues facing employers, workers, and pensioners.

    Release date: 1993-12-07
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-604-M1993026
    Description:

    The Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) are structured in terms of four economic or institutional sectors, and transactors are grouped into homogeneous categories that play distinct roles in the economy. The Personal sector is concerned with individuals in their capacity as final consumers and as suppliers of labour. The Government sector centres on transactions by public authorities as they relate to taxation and public expenditure. The Profit-motivated Business sector consists of transactors producing goods and services for financial gain. The Non-resident sector shows all transactions taking place between resident economic agents and the rest of the world. Classifying transactors by similar motivation and behaviour into these broad groups is a useful tool that helps analyse the major players in the economy, their functions and interrelationships.

    The purpose of this paper is to develop quarterly estimates of gross domestic product (GDP) at factor cost in both current and constant prices for each of the institutional sectors within the IEA framework. The estimates of that will be shown, of the GDP, by sector, do not constitute a full production account, but nonetheless provide a measure of aggregate productive activity by sector of origin. They complement and extend the sector tables already available in the Income and Expenditure Accounts.

    Release date: 1993-11-30

  • Classification: 12-565-X
    Description:

    The Standard Occupational Classification provides a systematic classification structure to identify and categorize the entire range of occupational activity in Canada. This up-to-date classification is based upon, and easily related to, the National Occupational Classification. It consists of 10 broad occupational categories which are subdivided into major groups, minor groups and unit groups. Definitions and occupational titles are provided for each unit group. An alphabetical index of the occupational titles classified to the unit group level is also included.

    Release date: 1993-08-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-604-M1993023
    Description:

    This paper reports the results of a survey of national Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) release date practices as reported by national statistical bureaus. This international survey was conducted by the author between January and March 1993 by means of a questionnaire mailed to statisticians of several countries.

    Respondents to the survey were asked on what date their preliminary IEA estimates for each of the four quarters of the 1991 calendar year were officially released. They were also asked to indicate the dates on which each of the subsequent four revised sets of estimates were released. To avoid the possibility of unwarranted generalizations from a single year's experience, respondents were asked whether 1991 was a typical year or if there were special circumstances that affected the release dates in this particular period. Finally, general information was sought on each country's official revision policy.

    Release date: 1993-07-01
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