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All (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2017001
    Description:

    The Annual Review of the Labour Market analyses recent trends on a yearly basis using data from a variety of sources such as the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours, the Employment Insurance Statistics Program, and the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey. The focus is on trends at the national level, although some selected trends will be examined at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2017-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015052
    Description:

    In this Economic Insights article, the decline in the youth labour force participation rate from 2008 to 2014 is decomposed, in an accounting framework, into components attributable to changes in school enrolment and in students’ and non-students’ labour force participation. The data are analyzed by sex, province and immigrant status. Changes in the composition of youth not in the labour force by student status and type of education pursued are also examined, as are changes in the percentage of youth who are neither in the labour force nor enrolled in full-time studies. The analysis is based on Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey from 1976 to 2014.

    Release date: 2015-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on recent labour market trends in Canada and the United States since the last recession. The data for Canada are from Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (LFS), while those for the U.S. are from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a survey produced for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Canadian data have been adjusted to the concepts used in the U.S. for the purposes of comparison with the U.S. data. The data for both countries are monthly and seasonally adjusted.

    Release date: 2014-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111915
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of employed people aged 25 to 34 with a university degree rose from 19% to 40% among women, and from 17% to 27% among men. Given the increase in the proportion of university graduates, did the occupational profile of young workers change over the period? This article examines long-term changes in the occupation profiles of young men and women, for both those who did and did not have a university degree. Changes in the share of women employed in these occupations are also examined.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014353
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's oil reserves are concentrated in three Canadian provinces: Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Oil prices received by Canadian oil producers more than doubled between 2001 and 2008. The proportion of young men employed in the oil industry differs markedly across provinces and education levels. Taken together, these facts suggest that the increases in world oil prices observed between 2001 and 2008 may have induced cross-educational and cross-provincial variation in labour demand and male wage growth in Canada. Using data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey, this study exploits this variation in wage growth in order to estimate the elasticity of young men's labour market participation and school enrollment with respect to wages.

    Release date: 2014-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111847
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The social and economic well-being of young people currently generates a lot of interest. Are young people different from previous generations? Do they experience more difficulties in the labour market? Are some doing better than others?

    Release date: 2013-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the aftermath of an economic downturn, young workers may experience difficulty finding their way into career employment. How many young workers are experiencing labour market instability, and why? This study provides a few answers by developing a statistical definition of employment instability, and by identifying which characteristics are most likely to be associated with labour market instability among non-student workers aged 16 to 29.

    Release date: 2013-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011090
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Not all high school graduates who attend a post-secondary institution go immediately after completing their diploma. An ever-increasing number of Canadian youth choose to remain out of the education system for a period of time prior to re-entering. A great deal of what we know about a gap year comes from other countries, particularly the United Kingdom. Who delays and for how long are, however, two questions that remain to be answered in the Canadian context. The current paper uses all five cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to address the scant attention paid in the Canadian literature to the delay of the start of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Kaplan Meier results show that the median length of time between high school graduation and start of the first post-secondary (PSE) program is 4 months; however, this appears to be substantially longer for males, First Nations youth, Anglophones, youth from Ontario and youth whose parents have low levels of educational attainment. Equally influential were characteristics during the high school years. For example, youth with low marks, who worked many hours in paid employment while in high school, who skipped classes regularly, who took part in a lot of extracurricular activities not organized by the school, and whose close friends said they were not planning on going to PSE had median gap times between high school graduation and the start of postsecondary studies that were much longer than the average. Cox Proportional Hazard models confirm the robustness of several of the descriptive findings, including the effects of gender, province of high school, parental education, working during high school, marks, extracurricular activities, and the education plans of close friends.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009075
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999. Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the five cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2007 when they were 26 to 28 years of age.

    Release date: 2009-07-09
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Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2017001
    Description:

    The Annual Review of the Labour Market analyses recent trends on a yearly basis using data from a variety of sources such as the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours, the Employment Insurance Statistics Program, and the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey. The focus is on trends at the national level, although some selected trends will be examined at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2017-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015052
    Description:

    In this Economic Insights article, the decline in the youth labour force participation rate from 2008 to 2014 is decomposed, in an accounting framework, into components attributable to changes in school enrolment and in students’ and non-students’ labour force participation. The data are analyzed by sex, province and immigrant status. Changes in the composition of youth not in the labour force by student status and type of education pursued are also examined, as are changes in the percentage of youth who are neither in the labour force nor enrolled in full-time studies. The analysis is based on Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey from 1976 to 2014.

    Release date: 2015-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on recent labour market trends in Canada and the United States since the last recession. The data for Canada are from Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (LFS), while those for the U.S. are from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a survey produced for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Canadian data have been adjusted to the concepts used in the U.S. for the purposes of comparison with the U.S. data. The data for both countries are monthly and seasonally adjusted.

    Release date: 2014-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111915
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of employed people aged 25 to 34 with a university degree rose from 19% to 40% among women, and from 17% to 27% among men. Given the increase in the proportion of university graduates, did the occupational profile of young workers change over the period? This article examines long-term changes in the occupation profiles of young men and women, for both those who did and did not have a university degree. Changes in the share of women employed in these occupations are also examined.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014353
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's oil reserves are concentrated in three Canadian provinces: Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Oil prices received by Canadian oil producers more than doubled between 2001 and 2008. The proportion of young men employed in the oil industry differs markedly across provinces and education levels. Taken together, these facts suggest that the increases in world oil prices observed between 2001 and 2008 may have induced cross-educational and cross-provincial variation in labour demand and male wage growth in Canada. Using data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey, this study exploits this variation in wage growth in order to estimate the elasticity of young men's labour market participation and school enrollment with respect to wages.

    Release date: 2014-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111847
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The social and economic well-being of young people currently generates a lot of interest. Are young people different from previous generations? Do they experience more difficulties in the labour market? Are some doing better than others?

    Release date: 2013-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the aftermath of an economic downturn, young workers may experience difficulty finding their way into career employment. How many young workers are experiencing labour market instability, and why? This study provides a few answers by developing a statistical definition of employment instability, and by identifying which characteristics are most likely to be associated with labour market instability among non-student workers aged 16 to 29.

    Release date: 2013-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011090
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Not all high school graduates who attend a post-secondary institution go immediately after completing their diploma. An ever-increasing number of Canadian youth choose to remain out of the education system for a period of time prior to re-entering. A great deal of what we know about a gap year comes from other countries, particularly the United Kingdom. Who delays and for how long are, however, two questions that remain to be answered in the Canadian context. The current paper uses all five cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to address the scant attention paid in the Canadian literature to the delay of the start of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Kaplan Meier results show that the median length of time between high school graduation and start of the first post-secondary (PSE) program is 4 months; however, this appears to be substantially longer for males, First Nations youth, Anglophones, youth from Ontario and youth whose parents have low levels of educational attainment. Equally influential were characteristics during the high school years. For example, youth with low marks, who worked many hours in paid employment while in high school, who skipped classes regularly, who took part in a lot of extracurricular activities not organized by the school, and whose close friends said they were not planning on going to PSE had median gap times between high school graduation and the start of postsecondary studies that were much longer than the average. Cox Proportional Hazard models confirm the robustness of several of the descriptive findings, including the effects of gender, province of high school, parental education, working during high school, marks, extracurricular activities, and the education plans of close friends.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009075
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999. Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the five cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2007 when they were 26 to 28 years of age.

    Release date: 2009-07-09
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