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All (25) (0 to 10 of 25 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2013100
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Past research has revealed that young women are more likely to enter postsecondary programs that have lower returns in the labour market, such as the arts, humanities and social sciences. Young men, conversely, tend to enrol in and graduate from programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), which generally have greater labour market returns. Factors such as academic interests, achievement test scores, and high-school marks can affect later university program choice. Using the linked Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) - Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) data, the current paper examines the relationship between mathematics and science test scores at age 15 and first program choice in university, with a focus on differences in ability in mathematics and science by gender. Generally speaking, the results reveal that the intersection of gender and ability does matter; even young women of high mathematical ability are less likely to enter STEM fields than young men of similar or even lesser mathematical ability. This implies that something other than pure ability is affecting young women's likelihood of entering STEM programs in university.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • 2. Canadians abroad Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110517
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada is also a player on the world stage as a source country of migrants. Whether Canadian migration abroad is temporary or permanent, long term or short term, far or near, Canadians are making their mark in other countries. This article, although not a complete accounting of Canadians living abroad, shows that Canadian out-migration is just as selective as in-migration.

    Release date: 2008-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410311
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The transition to adulthood is often viewed as a period where young people move by stages into adult roles: completing their schooling, leaving their parents' home, acquiring permanent work, finding a partner or spouse and becoming a parent. In recent years, social scientists have found that the transition to adulthood is taking longer to complete. Using census data to compare young adults in 1971 to those in 2001, it assesses just how lengthy the delay has become.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610378
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    According to some sources, many young adults are living with their parents longer (or returning after their initial departure) in order to save so they can purchase their own home when they eventually leave their parents' home. How closely does this theory reflect reality? This article examines whether there is a link between the age at which young people leave home, and the likelihood that they become homeowners in their 30s.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019182
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2003 General Social Survey (GSS) to examine the extent to which Canadians aged 15 and over feel a sense of mastery, or responsibility for what happens to them in life. A mastery scale, comprised of seven indicators measuring such elements as the respondent's perceived control over things that happen in life, problem solving capability, feelings of helplessness and the ability to accomplish goals, was used in the analysis. A statistical model was also designed to examine the influence of a number of socio-demographic, family, economic, community and well-being characteristics on the respondent's sense of personal control.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049124
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Who are the parents whose adult children still live at home? Are they less likely to have higher incomes and more likely to be immigrants? And how do these parents view their coresidence experience? This study uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to compare parents whose adult children are still at home with those whose adult children do not live with them anymore. It then examines whether or not coresidence is associated with significant negative outcomes, particularly in terms of conflicts within couples. It also contrasts parents whose adult children never left the house and those whose children returned to the nest after living independently for a time.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049125
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the 2003 General Social Survey (GSS), this paper examines the extent of helping behaviours given and received by young adults aged 15 to 24. This age group was chosen because the positive social behaviours of young adults are not often examined. Particular helping behaviours given and received in the month prior to the survey included providing emotional support; teaching, coaching, or giving practical advice; providing transportation or running errands; doing domestic work, home maintenance or outdoor work; helping with child care; or other forms of help.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038965
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Young adults are often viewed as uninterested in political activity. This article outlines the extent of political engagement among young adults in their 20s, as measured by traditional (voting) and alternative (non-voting) political participation. It then examines some of the links between young adults' selected characteristics and their political behaviours such as voting, signing petitions, boycotting certain products, attending public meetings or participating in demonstrations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026620
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which never-married and previously married people who have never lived common-law in the past would be willing to do so in the future.

    Release date: 2003-09-09
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 21F0018X
    Description:

    This slide presentation provides a profile of basic structures and trends in rural and small town Canada.

    Release date: 2001-05-28
Analysis (24)

Analysis (24) (0 to 10 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2013100
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Past research has revealed that young women are more likely to enter postsecondary programs that have lower returns in the labour market, such as the arts, humanities and social sciences. Young men, conversely, tend to enrol in and graduate from programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), which generally have greater labour market returns. Factors such as academic interests, achievement test scores, and high-school marks can affect later university program choice. Using the linked Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) - Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) data, the current paper examines the relationship between mathematics and science test scores at age 15 and first program choice in university, with a focus on differences in ability in mathematics and science by gender. Generally speaking, the results reveal that the intersection of gender and ability does matter; even young women of high mathematical ability are less likely to enter STEM fields than young men of similar or even lesser mathematical ability. This implies that something other than pure ability is affecting young women's likelihood of entering STEM programs in university.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • 2. Canadians abroad Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110517
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada is also a player on the world stage as a source country of migrants. Whether Canadian migration abroad is temporary or permanent, long term or short term, far or near, Canadians are making their mark in other countries. This article, although not a complete accounting of Canadians living abroad, shows that Canadian out-migration is just as selective as in-migration.

    Release date: 2008-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410311
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The transition to adulthood is often viewed as a period where young people move by stages into adult roles: completing their schooling, leaving their parents' home, acquiring permanent work, finding a partner or spouse and becoming a parent. In recent years, social scientists have found that the transition to adulthood is taking longer to complete. Using census data to compare young adults in 1971 to those in 2001, it assesses just how lengthy the delay has become.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610378
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    According to some sources, many young adults are living with their parents longer (or returning after their initial departure) in order to save so they can purchase their own home when they eventually leave their parents' home. How closely does this theory reflect reality? This article examines whether there is a link between the age at which young people leave home, and the likelihood that they become homeowners in their 30s.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019182
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2003 General Social Survey (GSS) to examine the extent to which Canadians aged 15 and over feel a sense of mastery, or responsibility for what happens to them in life. A mastery scale, comprised of seven indicators measuring such elements as the respondent's perceived control over things that happen in life, problem solving capability, feelings of helplessness and the ability to accomplish goals, was used in the analysis. A statistical model was also designed to examine the influence of a number of socio-demographic, family, economic, community and well-being characteristics on the respondent's sense of personal control.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049124
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Who are the parents whose adult children still live at home? Are they less likely to have higher incomes and more likely to be immigrants? And how do these parents view their coresidence experience? This study uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to compare parents whose adult children are still at home with those whose adult children do not live with them anymore. It then examines whether or not coresidence is associated with significant negative outcomes, particularly in terms of conflicts within couples. It also contrasts parents whose adult children never left the house and those whose children returned to the nest after living independently for a time.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049125
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the 2003 General Social Survey (GSS), this paper examines the extent of helping behaviours given and received by young adults aged 15 to 24. This age group was chosen because the positive social behaviours of young adults are not often examined. Particular helping behaviours given and received in the month prior to the survey included providing emotional support; teaching, coaching, or giving practical advice; providing transportation or running errands; doing domestic work, home maintenance or outdoor work; helping with child care; or other forms of help.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038965
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Young adults are often viewed as uninterested in political activity. This article outlines the extent of political engagement among young adults in their 20s, as measured by traditional (voting) and alternative (non-voting) political participation. It then examines some of the links between young adults' selected characteristics and their political behaviours such as voting, signing petitions, boycotting certain products, attending public meetings or participating in demonstrations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026620
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which never-married and previously married people who have never lived common-law in the past would be willing to do so in the future.

    Release date: 2003-09-09
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