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All (16)

All (16) (10 to 20 of 16 results)

  • 11. Update on families Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016529
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This update outlines the major changes that have occurred within families and to their living arrangements over the last 20 years.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016552
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at 'living apart together' (LAT) relationships where unmarried couples who live in separate residences maintain an intimate relationship.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001159
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to examine the extent to which an individual's use of unemployment insurance (UI) as a young adult is influenced by past experience with the program, and by having had a parent who also collected UI. A major methodological challenge is to determine the extent to which the intergenerational correlation of UI status is "spurious" or causal. Both the time to a first UI claim and the entire sequence of claims over an extended period are examined using two alternative ways of controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. The analysis is based upon longitudinal data on a cohort of young Canadian and Swedish men. It is found that parental use of UI shortens the time to a first UI claim in Canada, but not in Sweden. Subsequent participation in the Canadian program is influenced by parental UI history. In Sweden individual learning through past participation in UI - not family background - is the dominant avenue determining repeated participation.

    Release date: 2001-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990044910
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at how the types of conjugal unions women enter have changed, it examines whether starting life together in a common-law union influences the chances of the relationship breaking up.

    Release date: 2000-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044417
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at the growing phenomenon of young adults continuing to live at home with their parents.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995082
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Our aim in this paper is to resolve a paradox. Since the 1970s, there has been a downward secular trend in the average real and relative earnings of young adults under the age of 35. Despite the fact that most young children live in households headed by adults under 35, there has been no corresponding secular rise in the incidence of low income among children. Rather child poverty has followed the usual fluctuations of the business cycle.

    We show that the relative stability in child poverty rates in the face of declining labour market earnings is a result of two factors. First, the decline in market income in young households with children has been offset by rising transfers. Since the 1970s, social transfers have replaced earnings as the main source of income among low income families with children.

    Second, changes in the fertility behaviour and labour market characteristics of young adults have sharply reduced the risk of young children growing up in low income households. Today's young parents are better educated, working more hours, having fewer children, and postponing child-birth until later ages when earnings are higher. Although more children do find themselves in single parent families, this change has been swamped by other changes in family patterns and labour market behaviour that have reduced the risk of child poverty.

    Thus, the upward pressure on low income among children stemming from the labour market has been offset by social transfers, on the one hand, and by changes in family formation and the labour market behaviour of young adults, on the other. Except for cyclical variations, the result has been relative stability in the incidence of low income among children over the 1980s and early 1990s. Whether these offsetting patterns will continue in the last half of the 1990s remains to be seen.

    Release date: 1995-09-30
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0025X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 25 (2011) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 25 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history. As in all GSS surveys, data were also collected on the respondent's main activity, education and other socio-demographic characteristics. The 2011 GSS data can be used for cross-sectional and retrospective analyses (i.e. tracking the different family histories and trajectories followed by men and women).

    Release date: 2013-04-19
Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (10 to 20 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001159
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to examine the extent to which an individual's use of unemployment insurance (UI) as a young adult is influenced by past experience with the program, and by having had a parent who also collected UI. A major methodological challenge is to determine the extent to which the intergenerational correlation of UI status is "spurious" or causal. Both the time to a first UI claim and the entire sequence of claims over an extended period are examined using two alternative ways of controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. The analysis is based upon longitudinal data on a cohort of young Canadian and Swedish men. It is found that parental use of UI shortens the time to a first UI claim in Canada, but not in Sweden. Subsequent participation in the Canadian program is influenced by parental UI history. In Sweden individual learning through past participation in UI - not family background - is the dominant avenue determining repeated participation.

    Release date: 2001-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990044910
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at how the types of conjugal unions women enter have changed, it examines whether starting life together in a common-law union influences the chances of the relationship breaking up.

    Release date: 2000-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044417
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at the growing phenomenon of young adults continuing to live at home with their parents.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995082
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Our aim in this paper is to resolve a paradox. Since the 1970s, there has been a downward secular trend in the average real and relative earnings of young adults under the age of 35. Despite the fact that most young children live in households headed by adults under 35, there has been no corresponding secular rise in the incidence of low income among children. Rather child poverty has followed the usual fluctuations of the business cycle.

    We show that the relative stability in child poverty rates in the face of declining labour market earnings is a result of two factors. First, the decline in market income in young households with children has been offset by rising transfers. Since the 1970s, social transfers have replaced earnings as the main source of income among low income families with children.

    Second, changes in the fertility behaviour and labour market characteristics of young adults have sharply reduced the risk of young children growing up in low income households. Today's young parents are better educated, working more hours, having fewer children, and postponing child-birth until later ages when earnings are higher. Although more children do find themselves in single parent families, this change has been swamped by other changes in family patterns and labour market behaviour that have reduced the risk of child poverty.

    Thus, the upward pressure on low income among children stemming from the labour market has been offset by social transfers, on the one hand, and by changes in family formation and the labour market behaviour of young adults, on the other. Except for cyclical variations, the result has been relative stability in the incidence of low income among children over the 1980s and early 1990s. Whether these offsetting patterns will continue in the last half of the 1990s remains to be seen.

    Release date: 1995-09-30
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 97-553-G
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topic: Family variables.

    Release date: 2007-10-31
Date modified: