Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (16)

All (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016008
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series paints a demographic picture of young adults living with their parents in 2016. It describes recent trends and differences between rural regions and large urban centres.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Public use microdata: 12M0025X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 25 (2011) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 25 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history. As in all GSS surveys, data were also collected on the respondent's main activity, education and other socio-demographic characteristics. The 2011 GSS data can be used for cross-sectional and retrospective analyses (i.e. tracking the different family histories and trajectories followed by men and women).

    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

    Release date: 2013-03-05

  • Stats in brief: 98-312-X201100311704
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110647
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1985 and 2006, the percentage of Canadians living in dwellings where someone in the household was the owner gradually increased from about 70% to 78%.

    Release date: 2008-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410311
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The transition to adulthood is often viewed as a period where young people move by stages into adult roles: completing their schooling, leaving their parents' home, acquiring permanent work, finding a partner or spouse and becoming a parent. In recent years, social scientists have found that the transition to adulthood is taking longer to complete. Using census data to compare young adults in 1971 to those in 2001, it assesses just how lengthy the delay has become.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610378
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    According to some sources, many young adults are living with their parents longer (or returning after their initial departure) in order to save so they can purchase their own home when they eventually leave their parents' home. How closely does this theory reflect reality? This article examines whether there is a link between the age at which young people leave home, and the likelihood that they become homeowners in their 30s.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 97-553-G
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topic: Family variables.

    Release date: 2007-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049124
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Who are the parents whose adult children still live at home? Are they less likely to have higher incomes and more likely to be immigrants? And how do these parents view their coresidence experience? This study uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to compare parents whose adult children are still at home with those whose adult children do not live with them anymore. It then examines whether or not coresidence is associated with significant negative outcomes, particularly in terms of conflicts within couples. It also contrasts parents whose adult children never left the house and those whose children returned to the nest after living independently for a time.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026620
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which never-married and previously married people who have never lived common-law in the past would be willing to do so in the future.

    Release date: 2003-09-09
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0025X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 25 (2011) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 25 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history. As in all GSS surveys, data were also collected on the respondent's main activity, education and other socio-demographic characteristics. The 2011 GSS data can be used for cross-sectional and retrospective analyses (i.e. tracking the different family histories and trajectories followed by men and women).

    Release date: 2013-04-19
Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016008
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series paints a demographic picture of young adults living with their parents in 2016. It describes recent trends and differences between rural regions and large urban centres.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

    Release date: 2013-03-05

  • Stats in brief: 98-312-X201100311704
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110647
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1985 and 2006, the percentage of Canadians living in dwellings where someone in the household was the owner gradually increased from about 70% to 78%.

    Release date: 2008-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410311
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The transition to adulthood is often viewed as a period where young people move by stages into adult roles: completing their schooling, leaving their parents' home, acquiring permanent work, finding a partner or spouse and becoming a parent. In recent years, social scientists have found that the transition to adulthood is taking longer to complete. Using census data to compare young adults in 1971 to those in 2001, it assesses just how lengthy the delay has become.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700610378
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    According to some sources, many young adults are living with their parents longer (or returning after their initial departure) in order to save so they can purchase their own home when they eventually leave their parents' home. How closely does this theory reflect reality? This article examines whether there is a link between the age at which young people leave home, and the likelihood that they become homeowners in their 30s.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049124
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Who are the parents whose adult children still live at home? Are they less likely to have higher incomes and more likely to be immigrants? And how do these parents view their coresidence experience? This study uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to compare parents whose adult children are still at home with those whose adult children do not live with them anymore. It then examines whether or not coresidence is associated with significant negative outcomes, particularly in terms of conflicts within couples. It also contrasts parents whose adult children never left the house and those whose children returned to the nest after living independently for a time.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026620
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which never-married and previously married people who have never lived common-law in the past would be willing to do so in the future.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • 9. Update on families Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016529
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This update outlines the major changes that have occurred within families and to their living arrangements over the last 20 years.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016552
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at 'living apart together' (LAT) relationships where unmarried couples who live in separate residences maintain an intimate relationship.

    Release date: 2003-06-10
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 97-553-G
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topic: Family variables.

    Release date: 2007-10-31
Date modified: