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All (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100010
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has led to massive work interruptions in Canada and several other countries since mid-March 2020. The resulting economic lockdown has raised concerns about the ability of Canadian families to meet their financial obligations and essential needs. This article focuses on families who rely primarily on earnings—wages and salaries and self-employment income—to maintain their living standards.

    Release date: 2020-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2012001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses the concept of expected working life, developed in a previous article, and expands it to include involuntary retirements based on certain scenarios. We also examine the effect of level of education on expected working life.

    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011334
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, the long-term impact on earnings of attending post-secondary education institutions following job loss is estimated using a large longitudinal administrative database of Canadian workers. A difference-in-difference model is used for this purpose. The results suggest that, over the period spanning five years preceding and nine years following job loss, workers who attended post-secondary education shortly after displacement saw their earnings increase by almost $7,000 more than displaced workers who did not. Significant benefits are found by sex, age, marital status, and union coverage, with the exception of men aged 35 to 44 years. Despite the benefits of education, job displacement is found to be associated with only a modest increase in post-secondary education attendance for all groups examined.

    Release date: 2011-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910313227
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A sizeable earnings gap exists between Canadian women with children and those without. Women with children earned, on average, 12% less than women without children, and the gap increased with the number of children. Lone mothers, mothers with long career interruptions, and mothers with at least some postsecondary education experienced greater losses than married mothers, mothers with no or short career interruptions, and mothers with no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910513229
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Longitudinal data show that disability can be temporary or episodic. Between 1999 and 2004, only 13% of those reporting a disability were affected for the entire 6 years. The longer the disability period, the more likely the individuals were to have less education, be women, be older, live alone and work fewer hours per year. Moreover, the effects of a disability were often felt outside the actual period of the disability.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008314
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the 1983-to-2004 Longitudinal Worker File, this study examines the post-childbirth employment, job mobility and earnings trajectories of Canadian mothers. We found that both the long- and the short-term post-childbirth employment rates of early 2000s cohorts of Canadian mothers were higher than their mid-1980s counterparts, and, relative to childless women, Canadian mothers became less likely to quit over time.

    Our data also allow us to examine the earnings impact of childbirth for a group of Canadian mothers who had strong labour market attachment. For them, earnings dropped by 40% and 30% in the year of childbirth and the year after, respectively. Under both the fixed-effects and the fixed-trend models, the earnings impact of childbirth declined over the other post-childbirth years. Results from the fixed-trend model further suggest that, from the second to the seventh post-childbirth years, the negative effects varied between 8% and 3% and became negligible thereafter.

    Release date: 2008-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060109500
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    The number and rate of bankruptcies have fallen steadily since the mid-1990s. However, the liabilities from these failures have trended up, implying that more large firms are going bankrupt. There has been a marked narrowing of regional differences in bankruptcy rates.

    Release date: 2006-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the long-run trend in business bankruptcies in Canada, examines the reaction of bankruptcies by region to the stresses associated with fluctuations in the economy and analyses the relation between the incidence of bankruptcies and the economic health of the regions. Over the past 25 years, Canadian businesses have experienced a number of tumultuous periods. After 2 decades of high bankruptcy associated with 2 major recessions and the implementation of 2 free trade agreements in the 1980s and 1990s, bankruptcies have returned by 2005 to levels experienced in the early 1980s. At the same time, the differences between the bankruptcy rates of Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia fell as the intensity of bankruptcies in these 3 provinces converged. Throughout the period, bankruptcies in these 3 provinces moved in concert with unemployment rates in most provinces. The exceptions are Alberta and Nova Scotia, which experienced marked increases in bankruptcies in the early 1990s.

    Release date: 2006-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410313114
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510413139
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0010X
    Description:

    Cycle 10 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on the respondent's family. Topics covered include marital history, common- law unions, biological, adopted and step children, family origins, child leaving and fertility intentions.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1997-02-28
Analysis (20)

Analysis (20) (0 to 10 of 20 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100010
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic has led to massive work interruptions in Canada and several other countries since mid-March 2020. The resulting economic lockdown has raised concerns about the ability of Canadian families to meet their financial obligations and essential needs. This article focuses on families who rely primarily on earnings—wages and salaries and self-employment income—to maintain their living standards.

    Release date: 2020-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2012001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses the concept of expected working life, developed in a previous article, and expands it to include involuntary retirements based on certain scenarios. We also examine the effect of level of education on expected working life.

    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011334
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, the long-term impact on earnings of attending post-secondary education institutions following job loss is estimated using a large longitudinal administrative database of Canadian workers. A difference-in-difference model is used for this purpose. The results suggest that, over the period spanning five years preceding and nine years following job loss, workers who attended post-secondary education shortly after displacement saw their earnings increase by almost $7,000 more than displaced workers who did not. Significant benefits are found by sex, age, marital status, and union coverage, with the exception of men aged 35 to 44 years. Despite the benefits of education, job displacement is found to be associated with only a modest increase in post-secondary education attendance for all groups examined.

    Release date: 2011-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910313227
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A sizeable earnings gap exists between Canadian women with children and those without. Women with children earned, on average, 12% less than women without children, and the gap increased with the number of children. Lone mothers, mothers with long career interruptions, and mothers with at least some postsecondary education experienced greater losses than married mothers, mothers with no or short career interruptions, and mothers with no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910513229
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Longitudinal data show that disability can be temporary or episodic. Between 1999 and 2004, only 13% of those reporting a disability were affected for the entire 6 years. The longer the disability period, the more likely the individuals were to have less education, be women, be older, live alone and work fewer hours per year. Moreover, the effects of a disability were often felt outside the actual period of the disability.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008314
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the 1983-to-2004 Longitudinal Worker File, this study examines the post-childbirth employment, job mobility and earnings trajectories of Canadian mothers. We found that both the long- and the short-term post-childbirth employment rates of early 2000s cohorts of Canadian mothers were higher than their mid-1980s counterparts, and, relative to childless women, Canadian mothers became less likely to quit over time.

    Our data also allow us to examine the earnings impact of childbirth for a group of Canadian mothers who had strong labour market attachment. For them, earnings dropped by 40% and 30% in the year of childbirth and the year after, respectively. Under both the fixed-effects and the fixed-trend models, the earnings impact of childbirth declined over the other post-childbirth years. Results from the fixed-trend model further suggest that, from the second to the seventh post-childbirth years, the negative effects varied between 8% and 3% and became negligible thereafter.

    Release date: 2008-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060109500
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    The number and rate of bankruptcies have fallen steadily since the mid-1990s. However, the liabilities from these failures have trended up, implying that more large firms are going bankrupt. There has been a marked narrowing of regional differences in bankruptcy rates.

    Release date: 2006-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the long-run trend in business bankruptcies in Canada, examines the reaction of bankruptcies by region to the stresses associated with fluctuations in the economy and analyses the relation between the incidence of bankruptcies and the economic health of the regions. Over the past 25 years, Canadian businesses have experienced a number of tumultuous periods. After 2 decades of high bankruptcy associated with 2 major recessions and the implementation of 2 free trade agreements in the 1980s and 1990s, bankruptcies have returned by 2005 to levels experienced in the early 1980s. At the same time, the differences between the bankruptcy rates of Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia fell as the intensity of bankruptcies in these 3 provinces converged. Throughout the period, bankruptcies in these 3 provinces moved in concert with unemployment rates in most provinces. The exceptions are Alberta and Nova Scotia, which experienced marked increases in bankruptcies in the early 1990s.

    Release date: 2006-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410313114
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510413139
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22
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