Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

7 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (7)

All (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015370
    Description:

    Although most Canadian temporary foreign worker programs did not include provisions that allow participants to apply for permanent residency until recently, a substantial number of temporary foreign workers have become landed immigrants since the 1980s. For instance, from 2008 to 2012, about 32,000 temporary foreign workers gained permanent residency each year, accounting for 13% of the total inflow of landed immigrants. This paper examines the earnings of economic immigrants who initially arrived as temporary residents and held a work or study permit, and compares them to economic immigrants who were directly selected as permanent residents from abroad.

    Release date: 2015-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913257
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, this study sheds light on a specific aspect of newcomers' settlement-recognition of their foreign credentials and work experience in relation to their individual characteristics. These characteristics range from class of immigrant (skilled-worker principal applicants, family class, refugees, etc.), education and field of study to country where the highest credential was earned, and knowledge of English or French. The study also examines foreign credential and work experience recognition at three time points over a four-year period-six months, two years and four years after landing.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800510798
    Description:

    In a recent Statistics Canada study, Aneta Bonikowska, David Green and Craig Riddell (2008) use data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to measure the literacy skills of immigrants and the Canadian-born and relate these to earnings outcomes. The analysis takes into account standard demographic information, along with information on where education was obtained and age of migration to further refine their analysis of immigrant/Canadian-born earnings differentials. This article summarizes the results of their research.

    Release date: 2009-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper will present the labour market outcomes based on data collected by the Labour Force Survey in 2006 for core working-age immigrants (those aged 25 to 54), since they are more likely to have completed school and less likely to have entered retirement than those in the 15 and over group. A brief demographic profile of all immigrants will be presented followed by analysis of the labour market outcomes of core working-age immigrants nationally, by province, selected census metropolitan areas (CMA) and by sex. The labour market outcomes for immigrant youths and immigrants aged 55 and over will follow, in addition to a discussion of education-based outcomes for the core-aged immigrants, the industries in which these immigrants work, as well as their occupations.

    Release date: 2007-09-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-615-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), conducted jointly by Statistics Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada under the Policy Research Initiative, is a comprehensive survey designed to study the process by which new immigrants adapt to Canadian society. About 12,000 immigrants aged 15 and older who arrived in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001 were interviewed. By late 2005, when all three waves of interviews will have been completed, the survey will provide a better understanding of how the settlement process unfolds for new immigrants.

    The results of this survey will provide valuable information on how immigrants are meeting various challenges associated with integration and what resources are most helpful to their settlement in Canada. The main topics being investigated include housing, education, foreign credentials recognition, employment, income, the development and use of social networks, language skills, health, values and attitudes, and satisfaction with the settlement experience.

    Results from the first wave of the LSIC had shown that labour market integration was a particularly critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. This paper therefore focuses on this issue. The release addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2005-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410613121
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the problems new immigrants have when looking for a job in Canada, including non-recognition of their credentials, their education level, and their experience abroad.

    Release date: 2004-09-21
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015370
    Description:

    Although most Canadian temporary foreign worker programs did not include provisions that allow participants to apply for permanent residency until recently, a substantial number of temporary foreign workers have become landed immigrants since the 1980s. For instance, from 2008 to 2012, about 32,000 temporary foreign workers gained permanent residency each year, accounting for 13% of the total inflow of landed immigrants. This paper examines the earnings of economic immigrants who initially arrived as temporary residents and held a work or study permit, and compares them to economic immigrants who were directly selected as permanent residents from abroad.

    Release date: 2015-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913257
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, this study sheds light on a specific aspect of newcomers' settlement-recognition of their foreign credentials and work experience in relation to their individual characteristics. These characteristics range from class of immigrant (skilled-worker principal applicants, family class, refugees, etc.), education and field of study to country where the highest credential was earned, and knowledge of English or French. The study also examines foreign credential and work experience recognition at three time points over a four-year period-six months, two years and four years after landing.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800510798
    Description:

    In a recent Statistics Canada study, Aneta Bonikowska, David Green and Craig Riddell (2008) use data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS) to measure the literacy skills of immigrants and the Canadian-born and relate these to earnings outcomes. The analysis takes into account standard demographic information, along with information on where education was obtained and age of migration to further refine their analysis of immigrant/Canadian-born earnings differentials. This article summarizes the results of their research.

    Release date: 2009-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper will present the labour market outcomes based on data collected by the Labour Force Survey in 2006 for core working-age immigrants (those aged 25 to 54), since they are more likely to have completed school and less likely to have entered retirement than those in the 15 and over group. A brief demographic profile of all immigrants will be presented followed by analysis of the labour market outcomes of core working-age immigrants nationally, by province, selected census metropolitan areas (CMA) and by sex. The labour market outcomes for immigrant youths and immigrants aged 55 and over will follow, in addition to a discussion of education-based outcomes for the core-aged immigrants, the industries in which these immigrants work, as well as their occupations.

    Release date: 2007-09-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-615-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), conducted jointly by Statistics Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada under the Policy Research Initiative, is a comprehensive survey designed to study the process by which new immigrants adapt to Canadian society. About 12,000 immigrants aged 15 and older who arrived in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001 were interviewed. By late 2005, when all three waves of interviews will have been completed, the survey will provide a better understanding of how the settlement process unfolds for new immigrants.

    The results of this survey will provide valuable information on how immigrants are meeting various challenges associated with integration and what resources are most helpful to their settlement in Canada. The main topics being investigated include housing, education, foreign credentials recognition, employment, income, the development and use of social networks, language skills, health, values and attitudes, and satisfaction with the settlement experience.

    Results from the first wave of the LSIC had shown that labour market integration was a particularly critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. This paper therefore focuses on this issue. The release addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2005-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410613121
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the problems new immigrants have when looking for a job in Canada, including non-recognition of their credentials, their education level, and their experience abroad.

    Release date: 2004-09-21
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: