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All (4)

All (4) ((4 results))

  • Table: 63-236-X
    Description:

    This publication presents data on revenue and expense items from wholesalers and retailers by trade group and by province. There are 16 retail trade groups and 11 wholesale trade groups. Profiles of the retail trade groups are provided for each individual province/territory and are comprised of: number of locations, total operating revenues, cost of goods sold, gross margin and employee earnings and benefits. At the national level for each retail trade group are the following performance indicators: sales to inventory, cost of goods sold to inventory, gross margin and profit margin. Also provided at the national level are total operating revenues, number of locations for independent and for chain stores, the number of retail businesses by trade and total operating revenue by SIC (4 digit when possible).

    The 11 wholesale trade groups, plus grain and petroleum products, are profiled for each individual province/territory giving: number of locations, total operating revenues, cost of goods sold, gross margin and employee earnings and benefits. Performance indicators by trade group at the national level including sales to inventory, cost of goods sold to inventory, gross margin and profit margin are provided. Total operating revenue at the national level by Standard Industrial Classification and by class of customer and trade group are also provided.

    Release date: 2001-02-05

  • Table: 63-210-X
    Description:

    This on-line publication presents total retail sales by type of business, by province/territory, by selected Canadian metropolitan areas, by number of stores operated and by annual sales volume. Also provided are statistics on stocks on hand at year end, cost of goods sold and gross margins; distributions covering sales volume, physical size, sales per square foot (metre), department store commodity groupings and major and discount type department stores; and a list of chain and department stores. It includes definitions, methodology, data quality, survey questionnaire and a bibliography.

    Release date: 2001-02-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 34-252-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Has the Clothing Industry adapted to the changing economic environment?" by Yasmin Sheik. The clothing industry consists of establishments engaged in the production of men's, boys', women's, and children's wear as well as furs, foundation garments, hosiery, gloves, sweaters and occupational clothing.

    The clothing industry is labour intensive and requires only a limited number of special skills, and therefore it exists in almost every country in the world. In the past, developed countries, including Canada, restricted competition in this sector from low-wage developing countries by the imposition of country-specific import quotas. However, a change in trade policies has resulted in the reduction of trade barriers and increased competition. The Canadian Clothing and Textile industries now fall under the normal trading rules of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and World Trade Organization (WTO) besides being part of the North American rationalization process under the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with the U.S. and Mexico.

    Using data from the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1988 to 1997, this paper will show how the Canadian Clothing Industry has adapted to the changing economic environment. It will also comment on the recent period of growth using the Monthly Survey of Manufacturing and other indicators.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M1998012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the methods of adjustment for quality change made in the Canadian Consumer Price Index for the period 1989 to 1994. It finds that in most cases the current Canadian practice ensures that the replacement of one commodity by another, one variety of a commodity by another, or one outlet by another, has no impact on the overall index. The main exceptions to this result occur when replacing varieties of commodities that are purchased only occasionally, and a judgement is made that the quality ratio between the old and new variety is not the same as the ratio of their prices. In these cases there is an impact on the index, up or down, depending on whether the change in price reported is higher or lower than the change in quality. From the experience of the CPI in these six years there has been a correlation between the price ratio of a variety and its replacement and the index movement that derives from the judgement. The direction and size of the impact on the index depends largely on whether an item is replaced with a higher or lower priced item. For these reasons, the paper argues that more attention should be paid to ensuring that the item selection is more representative of current sales than has traditionally been the case.

    Release date: 1999-05-13
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 63-236-X
    Description:

    This publication presents data on revenue and expense items from wholesalers and retailers by trade group and by province. There are 16 retail trade groups and 11 wholesale trade groups. Profiles of the retail trade groups are provided for each individual province/territory and are comprised of: number of locations, total operating revenues, cost of goods sold, gross margin and employee earnings and benefits. At the national level for each retail trade group are the following performance indicators: sales to inventory, cost of goods sold to inventory, gross margin and profit margin. Also provided at the national level are total operating revenues, number of locations for independent and for chain stores, the number of retail businesses by trade and total operating revenue by SIC (4 digit when possible).

    The 11 wholesale trade groups, plus grain and petroleum products, are profiled for each individual province/territory giving: number of locations, total operating revenues, cost of goods sold, gross margin and employee earnings and benefits. Performance indicators by trade group at the national level including sales to inventory, cost of goods sold to inventory, gross margin and profit margin are provided. Total operating revenue at the national level by Standard Industrial Classification and by class of customer and trade group are also provided.

    Release date: 2001-02-05

  • Table: 63-210-X
    Description:

    This on-line publication presents total retail sales by type of business, by province/territory, by selected Canadian metropolitan areas, by number of stores operated and by annual sales volume. Also provided are statistics on stocks on hand at year end, cost of goods sold and gross margins; distributions covering sales volume, physical size, sales per square foot (metre), department store commodity groupings and major and discount type department stores; and a list of chain and department stores. It includes definitions, methodology, data quality, survey questionnaire and a bibliography.

    Release date: 2001-02-01
Analysis (2)

Analysis (2) ((2 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 34-252-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Has the Clothing Industry adapted to the changing economic environment?" by Yasmin Sheik. The clothing industry consists of establishments engaged in the production of men's, boys', women's, and children's wear as well as furs, foundation garments, hosiery, gloves, sweaters and occupational clothing.

    The clothing industry is labour intensive and requires only a limited number of special skills, and therefore it exists in almost every country in the world. In the past, developed countries, including Canada, restricted competition in this sector from low-wage developing countries by the imposition of country-specific import quotas. However, a change in trade policies has resulted in the reduction of trade barriers and increased competition. The Canadian Clothing and Textile industries now fall under the normal trading rules of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and World Trade Organization (WTO) besides being part of the North American rationalization process under the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with the U.S. and Mexico.

    Using data from the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1988 to 1997, this paper will show how the Canadian Clothing Industry has adapted to the changing economic environment. It will also comment on the recent period of growth using the Monthly Survey of Manufacturing and other indicators.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M1998012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the methods of adjustment for quality change made in the Canadian Consumer Price Index for the period 1989 to 1994. It finds that in most cases the current Canadian practice ensures that the replacement of one commodity by another, one variety of a commodity by another, or one outlet by another, has no impact on the overall index. The main exceptions to this result occur when replacing varieties of commodities that are purchased only occasionally, and a judgement is made that the quality ratio between the old and new variety is not the same as the ratio of their prices. In these cases there is an impact on the index, up or down, depending on whether the change in price reported is higher or lower than the change in quality. From the experience of the CPI in these six years there has been a correlation between the price ratio of a variety and its replacement and the index movement that derives from the judgement. The direction and size of the impact on the index depends largely on whether an item is replaced with a higher or lower priced item. For these reasons, the paper argues that more attention should be paid to ensuring that the item selection is more representative of current sales than has traditionally been the case.

    Release date: 1999-05-13
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