Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

3 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (49)

All (49) (0 to 10 of 49 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Table: 99-012-X2011051
    Geography: Province or territory, Census division
    Description:

    This table presents a cross-tabulation of data using selected characteristics from the National Household Survey.

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 88F0006X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in the "Information System for Science and Technology Project" to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents data tabulations taken from regular surveys on research and development (R&D) and S&T and made possible by the project.

    Release date: 2011-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811210766
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    During the 1991 to 2006 period, the proportion of immigrants with a university degree in jobs with low educational requirements increased, not only among recent immigrants but also among established ones. The increases for established immigrants suggest that the difficulties, which have long plagued recent immigrants, are not necessarily temporary. Changes in the profile of established immigrants - particularly language and country of origin - accounted for only a quarter of the deterioration for established immigrants.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810313205
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Hours of work can vary dramatically from job to job. And some research has indicated that the greater inequality of earnings into the mid-1990s was accompanied by increasing polarization of working hours. More recently, attention has focused on a decline in average working hours. This article quantifies changes in average work hours since the 1970s and examines how changes in the distribution of work hours contribute to the overall trend.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711113198
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Worldwide, depression is the leading cause of years lived with disability. It can affect many aspects of life, including work. In fact, the impact of depression on job performance has been estimated to be greater than that of chronic conditions. In 2002, almost 4% of employed Canadians aged 25 to 64 had had an episode of depression in the previous year. These workers had high odds of reducing work activity because of a long-term health condition, having at least one mental health disability day in the past two weeks, and being absent from work in the past week. In addition, depression was associated with reduced work activity and disability days two years later.

    Release date: 2007-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713147
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Excessive demands coupled with a lack of decision-making power can lead to job strain. Are older workers (aged 45 to 57) who experience high job strain more likely to retire early than those who do not feel under the same pressure at work? Managers, professionals, and technicians seem to be more affected than other occupations.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report examined the location of jobs in 27 census metropolitan areas, paying particular attention to developments in Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa-Hull, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. It also analysed the modes commuters used to travel to work, emphasising public transit and car (as driver or passenger) commute modes.

    While Canadian metropolitan areas continue to be characterized by a strong concentration of jobs in the downtown core, employment grew faster in the suburbs of Canada's largest metropolitan areas than in the city centres between 1996 and 2001. One characteristic of increasing employment in suburban locations is the shifting of manufacturing activities from the core of the city to the suburbs. Retail trade also shifted away from the central core towards more suburban locations. Relatively few workers employed outside the city centre commuted on public transit, rather, most drove or were a passenger in a car. This tendency to commute by car increased the farther the job was located from the city centre.

    Furthermore commute patterns have become more complex, with growth in suburb-to-suburb commutes outpacing traditional commute paths within the city centre, and between the city centre and suburbs. Commuters travelling from suburb to suburb were also much more likely to drive than take public transit.

    Despite the decentralization of jobs occurring in the metropolitan areas, public transit did not lose its share of commuters between 1996 and 2001. While more car traffic headed to jobs in the suburbs, a larger share of commuters heading for the city centre took public transit. This kept the total share of commuters who took public transit stable between 1996 and 2001.

    The report also found that jobs in the downtown core were higher skilled and higher paid, and that earnings increased faster for jobs in the city centre between 1996 and 2001.

    The report uses the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2005-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050037803
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Job growth has shifted from high tech and autos in the 1990s to housing, resources and retailing so far this decade. This change in demand has profound implications for where jobs are located and the type of occupational and educational skills required. Meanwhile, labour supply has been increasingly met by older workers, as the population ages and formerly slow-growth industries no longer push workers out of the labour force.

    Release date: 2005-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin investigates the spatial distribution of occupational structure and its change between 1991 and 2001.

    Release date: 2005-02-24
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 99-012-X2011051
    Geography: Province or territory, Census division
    Description:

    This table presents a cross-tabulation of data using selected characteristics from the National Household Survey.

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Public use microdata: 81M0013X
    Description:

    The Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) is Canada's most comprehensive source of data on individual participation in formal adult education and training. It is the only Canadian survey to collect detailed information about the skill development efforts of the entire adult Canadian population. The AETS provides information about the main subject of training activities, their provider, duration and the sources and types of support for training. Furthermore, the AETS allows for the examination of the socio-economic and demographic profiles of both training participants and non-participants. This survey also identifies barriers faced by individuals who wish to take some form of training but cannot. The AETS was administered three times during the 1990s, in 1992, 1994 and 1998, as a supplement to the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    The content of the AETS was revised to take into account recommendations coming from consultation exercises. As a result, more than half of the 2003 survey is made up of new questions and the target population has been modified.

    The main objectives are:1) To measure the incidence and intensity of adults' participation in job-related formal training.2) To profile employer support to job-related formal training.3) To analyze the aspects of job-related training activities such as: training provider, expenses, financial support, motivations, outcomes and difficulties experienced while training.4) To identify the barriers preventing individuals from participating in the job-related formal training they want or need to take.5) To identify reasons explaining adults' lack of participation and of interest in job-related formal training.6) To relate adults' current participation patterns to their past involvement in and plans about future participation in job-related training.7) To measure the incidence and frequency of adults' participation in job-related informal training.8) To examine the interactions between participation in formal and informal job-related training.

    The population covered by the AETS consists of Canadians 25 years of age and older. This is a change from the population previously targeted by the AETS, which consisted of Canadians aged 17 years of age and older. A primary consideration for this change was the practical difficulties in applying the definition of adult education to individuals in the 17 to 24 years of age group. By definition, adult education excludes students who are still involved in their first or initial stage of schooling. As previous AETS did not precisely identify students still in their initial stage of schooling, analyses using these data had to rely on an ad hoc definition of adult learners. According to this definition, individuals aged 17 to 24 who were not in one of the following situations were excluded from the analysis: full-time students subsidized by an employer and full-time students over 19 enrolled in elementary or secondary programs.

    Release date: 2004-05-27
Analysis (46)

Analysis (46) (0 to 10 of 46 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Journals and periodicals: 88F0006X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in the "Information System for Science and Technology Project" to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents data tabulations taken from regular surveys on research and development (R&D) and S&T and made possible by the project.

    Release date: 2011-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811210766
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    During the 1991 to 2006 period, the proportion of immigrants with a university degree in jobs with low educational requirements increased, not only among recent immigrants but also among established ones. The increases for established immigrants suggest that the difficulties, which have long plagued recent immigrants, are not necessarily temporary. Changes in the profile of established immigrants - particularly language and country of origin - accounted for only a quarter of the deterioration for established immigrants.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810313205
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Hours of work can vary dramatically from job to job. And some research has indicated that the greater inequality of earnings into the mid-1990s was accompanied by increasing polarization of working hours. More recently, attention has focused on a decline in average working hours. This article quantifies changes in average work hours since the 1970s and examines how changes in the distribution of work hours contribute to the overall trend.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711113198
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Worldwide, depression is the leading cause of years lived with disability. It can affect many aspects of life, including work. In fact, the impact of depression on job performance has been estimated to be greater than that of chronic conditions. In 2002, almost 4% of employed Canadians aged 25 to 64 had had an episode of depression in the previous year. These workers had high odds of reducing work activity because of a long-term health condition, having at least one mental health disability day in the past two weeks, and being absent from work in the past week. In addition, depression was associated with reduced work activity and disability days two years later.

    Release date: 2007-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713147
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Excessive demands coupled with a lack of decision-making power can lead to job strain. Are older workers (aged 45 to 57) who experience high job strain more likely to retire early than those who do not feel under the same pressure at work? Managers, professionals, and technicians seem to be more affected than other occupations.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report examined the location of jobs in 27 census metropolitan areas, paying particular attention to developments in Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa-Hull, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. It also analysed the modes commuters used to travel to work, emphasising public transit and car (as driver or passenger) commute modes.

    While Canadian metropolitan areas continue to be characterized by a strong concentration of jobs in the downtown core, employment grew faster in the suburbs of Canada's largest metropolitan areas than in the city centres between 1996 and 2001. One characteristic of increasing employment in suburban locations is the shifting of manufacturing activities from the core of the city to the suburbs. Retail trade also shifted away from the central core towards more suburban locations. Relatively few workers employed outside the city centre commuted on public transit, rather, most drove or were a passenger in a car. This tendency to commute by car increased the farther the job was located from the city centre.

    Furthermore commute patterns have become more complex, with growth in suburb-to-suburb commutes outpacing traditional commute paths within the city centre, and between the city centre and suburbs. Commuters travelling from suburb to suburb were also much more likely to drive than take public transit.

    Despite the decentralization of jobs occurring in the metropolitan areas, public transit did not lose its share of commuters between 1996 and 2001. While more car traffic headed to jobs in the suburbs, a larger share of commuters heading for the city centre took public transit. This kept the total share of commuters who took public transit stable between 1996 and 2001.

    The report also found that jobs in the downtown core were higher skilled and higher paid, and that earnings increased faster for jobs in the city centre between 1996 and 2001.

    The report uses the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2005-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050037803
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Job growth has shifted from high tech and autos in the 1990s to housing, resources and retailing so far this decade. This change in demand has profound implications for where jobs are located and the type of occupational and educational skills required. Meanwhile, labour supply has been increasingly met by older workers, as the population ages and formerly slow-growth industries no longer push workers out of the labour force.

    Release date: 2005-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin investigates the spatial distribution of occupational structure and its change between 1991 and 2001.

    Release date: 2005-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2004004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Immigrants make up a much smaller portion of the population in rural regions than in urban areas. Recent immigrants are even less likely to be found in rural regions. However, according to this bulletin, immigrants living in rural regions had higher levels of education in 1996, a higher rate of employment, and were more likely to work in professional services.

    Release date: 2004-06-15
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Classification: 12-565-X
    Description:

    The Standard Occupational Classification provides a systematic classification structure to identify and categorize the entire range of occupational activity in Canada. This up-to-date classification is based upon, and easily related to, the National Occupational Classification. It consists of 10 broad occupational categories which are subdivided into major groups, minor groups and unit groups. Definitions and occupational titles are provided for each unit group. An alphabetical index of the occupational titles classified to the unit group level is also included.

    Release date: 1993-08-23
Date modified: