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All (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022087
    Description: Physical flow accounts (PFA) record the annual flows of natural resources, products and residuals between the Canadian economy and the environment. The Water Account describes the use of the natural resource input of water and of water accessed through municipal water supply or irrigation systems by industries, governments, institutions, and households.
    Release date: 2022-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X201700014784
    Description: The article "Freshwater in Canada" provides up-to-date statistics on freshwater supply and demand. The report includes includes maps, charts and tables for each of Canada's 25 drainage regions. It also provides data on some of the factors that influence the supply and quality of freshwater.
    Release date: 2017-03-21

  • Stats in brief: 16-508-X2016001
    Description:

    This fact sheet looks at the irrigation methods and conservation practices used on Canadian farms, using data from the 2014 Agricultural Water Survey.

    Release date: 2016-07-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 16-001-M2010014
    Description: Quantifying how Canada's water yield has changed over time is an important component of the water accounts maintained by Statistics Canada. This study evaluates the movement in the series of annual water yield estimates for Southern Canada from 1971 to 2004. We estimated the movement in the series using a trend-cycle approach and found that water yield for southern Canada has generally decreased over the period of observation.
    Release date: 2010-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200900210889
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's renewable water resources are mostly the result of rain and melted snow that flow over the ground, eventually reaching our rivers and lakes. This article describes the results of a new methodology producing consistent national estimates of Canada's total annual average water yield from 1971 to 2000.

    Release date: 2009-06-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 16-001-M2009007
    Description:

    In this paper, we present the methodology developed by Statistics Canada to calculate the average annual water yield for Canada. Water yield, for the purposes of this paper, is defined as the amount of freshwater derived from unregulated flow (m3 s-1) measurements for a given geographic area over a defined period of time. The methodology is applied to the 1971 to 2000 time period.

    This research was conducted to fill data gaps in Statistics Canada's water statistics program. These gaps exist because estimates of freshwater flow for Canada have not been calculated regularly and have been produced using a variety of methods that do not necessarily generate comparable results. The methodology developed in this study produced results that are coherent through space and time. These results will be used in the future to investigate changes in water yield on a more disaggregated basis.

    To achieve the water yield estimate a database of natural streamflow observations from 1971 to 2000 was compiled. The streamflow values were then converted to a runoff depth and interpolated using ordinary kriging to produce spatial estimates of runoff. The spatial estimates were then scaled to create a National estimate of water yield as a thirty-year average. The methodology and results were then validated using a stability analysis and several techniques involving uncertainty. The result of the methodology indicates that the thirty-year average water yield for Canada is 3435 km3.

    Release date: 2009-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007005
    Geography: Canada
    Description: This bulletin's analysis focuses on the effect of "rurality" in determining: 1) water consumption flows at the municipal level; and 2) water quality perception of a household, as proxied by the water treatment choice of a household.
    Release date: 2009-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2008019
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The overall growth of government-owned infrastructure has been very similar across most regions over the past 44 years. With the exception of the Atlantic Provinces, the range of average annual capital growth from one region to the next has been very narrow, falling between 1.8% and 2.2% since 1961, according to a new study released in September 2007 in the Canadian Economic Observer.

    Since 2000, governments have increased their infrastructure capital more than at any time since the 1960s and 1970s. However, the growth has not been strong enough to prevent more and more signs of wear in our infrastructure (the data are net of depreciation and in constant 1997 dollars). This is due to cuts in the 1990s when governments were grappling with significant budgetary deficits, as well as many of the assets built in the post-war infrastructure boom reaching the end of their life span.

    This study analyses, from 1961 to 2005, government investment in infrastructure by different levels of government and type of asset by region.

    Release date: 2008-02-07

  • Table: 16F0008X
    Description:

    This report presents estimates of national and provincial economic activity of the environment industry in Canada, including the revenues earned from the production of environmental goods, the provision of environmental services and the undertaking of environment-related construction activities.

    The environment industry is composed of establishments operating in a variety of industries that produce environmental goods and services. Environmental goods and services are goods and services that are used, or can potentially be used to measure, prevent, limit or correct environmental damage (both natural or by human activity) to water, air, soil as well as problems related to waste, noise and ecosystems. They also include clean or resource-efficient (eco-efficient) technologies that decrease material inputs, reduce energy consumption, recover valuable by-products, reduce emissions and/or minimise waste disposal problems.

    Release date: 2007-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700910332
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article finds that the volume of infrastructure capital has rebounded since 2000 after two decades of neglect. While infrastructure growth has been similar across regions, there are sharp differences in the type of asset targeted by the regions, especially when spending slowed after 1980.

    Release date: 2007-09-13
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 16F0008X
    Description:

    This report presents estimates of national and provincial economic activity of the environment industry in Canada, including the revenues earned from the production of environmental goods, the provision of environmental services and the undertaking of environment-related construction activities.

    The environment industry is composed of establishments operating in a variety of industries that produce environmental goods and services. Environmental goods and services are goods and services that are used, or can potentially be used to measure, prevent, limit or correct environmental damage (both natural or by human activity) to water, air, soil as well as problems related to waste, noise and ecosystems. They also include clean or resource-efficient (eco-efficient) technologies that decrease material inputs, reduce energy consumption, recover valuable by-products, reduce emissions and/or minimise waste disposal problems.

    Release date: 2007-09-24
Analysis (9)

Analysis (9) ((9 results))

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022087
    Description: Physical flow accounts (PFA) record the annual flows of natural resources, products and residuals between the Canadian economy and the environment. The Water Account describes the use of the natural resource input of water and of water accessed through municipal water supply or irrigation systems by industries, governments, institutions, and households.
    Release date: 2022-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X201700014784
    Description: The article "Freshwater in Canada" provides up-to-date statistics on freshwater supply and demand. The report includes includes maps, charts and tables for each of Canada's 25 drainage regions. It also provides data on some of the factors that influence the supply and quality of freshwater.
    Release date: 2017-03-21

  • Stats in brief: 16-508-X2016001
    Description:

    This fact sheet looks at the irrigation methods and conservation practices used on Canadian farms, using data from the 2014 Agricultural Water Survey.

    Release date: 2016-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200900210889
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's renewable water resources are mostly the result of rain and melted snow that flow over the ground, eventually reaching our rivers and lakes. This article describes the results of a new methodology producing consistent national estimates of Canada's total annual average water yield from 1971 to 2000.

    Release date: 2009-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007005
    Geography: Canada
    Description: This bulletin's analysis focuses on the effect of "rurality" in determining: 1) water consumption flows at the municipal level; and 2) water quality perception of a household, as proxied by the water treatment choice of a household.
    Release date: 2009-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2008019
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The overall growth of government-owned infrastructure has been very similar across most regions over the past 44 years. With the exception of the Atlantic Provinces, the range of average annual capital growth from one region to the next has been very narrow, falling between 1.8% and 2.2% since 1961, according to a new study released in September 2007 in the Canadian Economic Observer.

    Since 2000, governments have increased their infrastructure capital more than at any time since the 1960s and 1970s. However, the growth has not been strong enough to prevent more and more signs of wear in our infrastructure (the data are net of depreciation and in constant 1997 dollars). This is due to cuts in the 1990s when governments were grappling with significant budgetary deficits, as well as many of the assets built in the post-war infrastructure boom reaching the end of their life span.

    This study analyses, from 1961 to 2005, government investment in infrastructure by different levels of government and type of asset by region.

    Release date: 2008-02-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700910332
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article finds that the volume of infrastructure capital has rebounded since 2000 after two decades of neglect. While infrastructure growth has been similar across regions, there are sharp differences in the type of asset targeted by the regions, especially when spending slowed after 1980.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin extends the analysis to present selected socioeconomic characteristics of the population by type of watershed. This analysis is based on Statistics Canada's 2001 Census of Population data tabulated according to drainage sub-basins.

    Release date: 2007-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005006
    Geography: Canada
    Description: This bulletin groups watersheds according to the share of their population that is designated as "census rural" in order to profile the rural versus urban demographic structure of watersheds across Canada.
    Release date: 2006-01-05
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 16-001-M2010014
    Description: Quantifying how Canada's water yield has changed over time is an important component of the water accounts maintained by Statistics Canada. This study evaluates the movement in the series of annual water yield estimates for Southern Canada from 1971 to 2004. We estimated the movement in the series using a trend-cycle approach and found that water yield for southern Canada has generally decreased over the period of observation.
    Release date: 2010-09-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 16-001-M2009007
    Description:

    In this paper, we present the methodology developed by Statistics Canada to calculate the average annual water yield for Canada. Water yield, for the purposes of this paper, is defined as the amount of freshwater derived from unregulated flow (m3 s-1) measurements for a given geographic area over a defined period of time. The methodology is applied to the 1971 to 2000 time period.

    This research was conducted to fill data gaps in Statistics Canada's water statistics program. These gaps exist because estimates of freshwater flow for Canada have not been calculated regularly and have been produced using a variety of methods that do not necessarily generate comparable results. The methodology developed in this study produced results that are coherent through space and time. These results will be used in the future to investigate changes in water yield on a more disaggregated basis.

    To achieve the water yield estimate a database of natural streamflow observations from 1971 to 2000 was compiled. The streamflow values were then converted to a runoff depth and interpolated using ordinary kriging to produce spatial estimates of runoff. The spatial estimates were then scaled to create a National estimate of water yield as a thirty-year average. The methodology and results were then validated using a stability analysis and several techniques involving uncertainty. The result of the methodology indicates that the thirty-year average water yield for Canada is 3435 km3.

    Release date: 2009-06-01
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