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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-514-G
    Description:

    The Guide to the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions, and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, processing, and data quality. The guide covers both components of the survey: the job vacancy component, which is quarterly, and the wage component, which is annual.

    Release date: 2019-06-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-514-G2016001
    Description:

    The Guide to the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) covers the job vacancy component, including a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection and processing, and data quality. The wage component of the JVWS will be covered in a subsequent version of this guide, when wage data by occupation are released.

    Release date: 2016-08-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-514-G2015002
    Description:

    This revised version of the Guide to the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey covers the job vacancy component. The guide contains an updated dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection and processing, and data quality. The wage component is not covered; it will be covered in a subsequent version of this guide, when annual wage data by occupation are released.

    Release date: 2015-11-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-514-G2015001
    Description:

    This version of the Guide to the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey covers the job vacancy component. The guide contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection and processing, and data quality. The wage component is not covered; it will be covered in a subsequent version of this guide, when annual wage data by occupation are released.

    Release date: 2015-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014353
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's oil reserves are concentrated in three Canadian provinces: Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Oil prices received by Canadian oil producers more than doubled between 2001 and 2008. The proportion of young men employed in the oil industry differs markedly across provinces and education levels. Taken together, these facts suggest that the increases in world oil prices observed between 2001 and 2008 may have induced cross-educational and cross-provincial variation in labour demand and male wage growth in Canada. Using data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey, this study exploits this variation in wage growth in order to estimate the elasticity of young men's labour market participation and school enrollment with respect to wages.

    Release date: 2014-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013347
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines how real wages of Canadian workers evolved from 1981 to 2011 across five dimensions: gender, age, education, industry, and occupation.

    Release date: 2013-03-15

  • 7. Layoffs in Canada Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513250
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Layoffs displace a large number of workers each year, and they are known to have lasting effects on individuals' standard of living. This study conducts a comparative analysis of the risk of layoff between the 1990s and 2000s, seeking to identify the factors associated with this risk. It then examines the duration of jobless spells as well as various characteristics of the lost jobs and subsequent jobs, such as the wage, union coverage and participation in a retirement plan.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009056
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of plants in the manufacturing sector undergoing changes in ownership to further our understanding of the underlying causes of mergers and acquisitions. Previous Canadian studies (Baldwin 1995; Baldwin and Caves 1991) compare the performance of merged plants at the beginning and the end of the 1970s. This paper examines annual changes that occurred over the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to provide a longer-run perspective. In doing so, it outlines the amount of change taking place (both the number of plants affected and the share of employment) and the characteristics of plants that led to their takeover. Differences between foreign and domestic takeovers are also examined.

    Release date: 2009-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002186
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Current trends in marriage and fertility patterns suggest that young Canadian women are delaying family formation and concentrating on developing their careers. Using data from the 1998 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this study provides Canadian evidence on the effect of marital status and parenthood status on the wage rates of Canadian women. As well, this paper attempts to determine whether decisions regarding the timing of family formation influence the wages of women and whether these decisions have a permanent or temporary impact on earnings. The main results of the paper are as follows.

    After controlling for differences in work history, labour force qualifications and selected job characteristics, the cross sectional analysis suggests that there is no association between marital status and wages while the evidence on the relationship between wages and motherhood is mixed.

    When controls for years with children were included, there is a positive association of motherhood with wages that persists in the early years of motherhood but declines as the number of years with children lengthens. These results support the specialization, selection, differential treatment by employers and the work effort explanations for differences in the wages of mothers relative to other women. There is no such finding for married women and the duration of marriage.

    It is a well-documented fact that the acquisition of job-related skills and significant wage growth is concentrated at the start of workers' careers - which generally coincides with decisions regarding marriage and children. If this is the case, then the timing of marriage and children may be considered proxies for omitted, unobserved characteristics, related to human capital skills, differentiated work history or labour force attachment. Conforming to theoretical expectations when the timing of children is taken into account, women that postpone having children earn at least 6.0% more than women who have children early. There is no significant association between the timing of marriage and wages.

    The observed relationship between women's wages and their decision to delay having children tends to persist after the birth of their first child but tends to decline over time. Thus, augmented family responsibilities will tend to reduce any initial wage differentials based on delays of assuming these responsibilities.

    Release date: 2002-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010095987
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the number of Canadians usually working from home over the past three decades.

    Release date: 2001-12-12
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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014353
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's oil reserves are concentrated in three Canadian provinces: Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Oil prices received by Canadian oil producers more than doubled between 2001 and 2008. The proportion of young men employed in the oil industry differs markedly across provinces and education levels. Taken together, these facts suggest that the increases in world oil prices observed between 2001 and 2008 may have induced cross-educational and cross-provincial variation in labour demand and male wage growth in Canada. Using data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey, this study exploits this variation in wage growth in order to estimate the elasticity of young men's labour market participation and school enrollment with respect to wages.

    Release date: 2014-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013347
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines how real wages of Canadian workers evolved from 1981 to 2011 across five dimensions: gender, age, education, industry, and occupation.

    Release date: 2013-03-15

  • 3. Layoffs in Canada Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513250
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Layoffs displace a large number of workers each year, and they are known to have lasting effects on individuals' standard of living. This study conducts a comparative analysis of the risk of layoff between the 1990s and 2000s, seeking to identify the factors associated with this risk. It then examines the duration of jobless spells as well as various characteristics of the lost jobs and subsequent jobs, such as the wage, union coverage and participation in a retirement plan.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009056
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of plants in the manufacturing sector undergoing changes in ownership to further our understanding of the underlying causes of mergers and acquisitions. Previous Canadian studies (Baldwin 1995; Baldwin and Caves 1991) compare the performance of merged plants at the beginning and the end of the 1970s. This paper examines annual changes that occurred over the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to provide a longer-run perspective. In doing so, it outlines the amount of change taking place (both the number of plants affected and the share of employment) and the characteristics of plants that led to their takeover. Differences between foreign and domestic takeovers are also examined.

    Release date: 2009-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002186
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Current trends in marriage and fertility patterns suggest that young Canadian women are delaying family formation and concentrating on developing their careers. Using data from the 1998 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this study provides Canadian evidence on the effect of marital status and parenthood status on the wage rates of Canadian women. As well, this paper attempts to determine whether decisions regarding the timing of family formation influence the wages of women and whether these decisions have a permanent or temporary impact on earnings. The main results of the paper are as follows.

    After controlling for differences in work history, labour force qualifications and selected job characteristics, the cross sectional analysis suggests that there is no association between marital status and wages while the evidence on the relationship between wages and motherhood is mixed.

    When controls for years with children were included, there is a positive association of motherhood with wages that persists in the early years of motherhood but declines as the number of years with children lengthens. These results support the specialization, selection, differential treatment by employers and the work effort explanations for differences in the wages of mothers relative to other women. There is no such finding for married women and the duration of marriage.

    It is a well-documented fact that the acquisition of job-related skills and significant wage growth is concentrated at the start of workers' careers - which generally coincides with decisions regarding marriage and children. If this is the case, then the timing of marriage and children may be considered proxies for omitted, unobserved characteristics, related to human capital skills, differentiated work history or labour force attachment. Conforming to theoretical expectations when the timing of children is taken into account, women that postpone having children earn at least 6.0% more than women who have children early. There is no significant association between the timing of marriage and wages.

    The observed relationship between women's wages and their decision to delay having children tends to persist after the birth of their first child but tends to decline over time. Thus, augmented family responsibilities will tend to reduce any initial wage differentials based on delays of assuming these responsibilities.

    Release date: 2002-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010095987
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the number of Canadians usually working from home over the past three decades.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001169
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper documents the changing geography of the Canadian manufacturing sector over a twenty-two year period (1976-1997). It does so by looking at the shifts in employment, as well as other measures of industrial change, across different levels of the rural/urban hierarchy - central cities, adjacent suburbs, medium and small cities, and rural areas.

    The analysis demonstrates that the most dramatic shifts in manufacturing employment were from the central cities of large metropolitan regions to their suburbs. Paralleling trends in the United States, rural regions of Canada have increased their share of manufacturing employment. Rising rural employment shares were due to declining employment shares of small cities and, to lesser degree, large urban regions. Increasing rural employment was particularly prominent in Quebec, where employment shifted away from the Montreal region. By way of contrast, Ontario's rural regions only maintained their share of employment and the Toronto region increased its share of provincial employment over the period. The changing fortunes of rural and urban areas was not the result of across-the-board shifts in manufacturing employment, but was the net outcome of differing locational patterns across industries.

    Change across the rural/urban hierarchy is also measured in terms of wage and productivity levels, diversity, and volatility. In contrast to the United States, wages and productivity in Canada do not consistently decline moving down the rural/urban hierarchy from the largest cities to the most rural parts of the country. Only after controlling for the types of manufacturing industries found in rural and urban regions is it apparent that wages and productivity decline with the size of place. The analysis also demonstrates that over time most rural and urban regions are diversifying across a wider variety of manufacturing industries and that shifts in employment shares across industries - a measure of economic instability - has for some rural/urban classifications increased modestly.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001177
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Recent research has suggested that investment has shifted from urban areas to more rural locales. However, Canadian manufacturing remains predominantly an urban activity with more than 40% of manufacturing employment located in Canada's three largest urban regions. This paper examines the changing manufacturing landscapes of Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver and outlines the shifts in industry mix, employment, and wage levels that have taken place over the period between 1976 and 1997. The analysis uses a longitudinal plant-level database based upon the Annual Survey of Manufactures conducted by Statistics Canada.

    Toronto and Vancouver both experience growth in the manufacturing sector, while Montreal experiences decline driven by differences in their industrial structure. Manufacturing activity has increased in a number of sectors of Toronto's economy, but has been particularly influenced by the growing automotive sector that ties the city to a large North American market. Montreal has experienced declines across most of the manufacturing industries. A heavy concentration of employment in labour intensive industries such as textiles and clothing, which have experienced severe declines across Canada, has amplified the level of decline in Montreal. However, Montreal has seen some growth in science-based industries. While Vancouver's manufacturing economy is much smaller in absolute terms, maintaining slightly less than a 5% share of national manufacturing employment, it has exhibited higher levels of long-run growth and restructuring than its eastern counterparts.

    A second focus of the paper is to explore the relationship between economic volatility and diversity in the manufacturing sector using a number of statistical measures. Toronto and Montreal have diverse industrial structures, although each has become slightly more concentrated over the study period. In Montreal, this is due to the increasing importance of other industries, as the clothing and textiles industry declines. In Toronto, this can be attributed to the increased importance of the food and transportation equipment industries. Vancouver has become increasingly diversified over the study period, reflecting the growth and dynamism of this sector. The mature manufacturing economies of Toronto and Montreal exhibit lower levels of volatility than their western counterpart.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • 9. After the layoff Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010105960
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study looks at the results of permanent layoffs from full-time jobs. How long does it take laid-off workers to find a new job? What factors affect the length of joblessness? For those who are successful in finding a new job, what is the wage gap between the old job and the new one? What factors influence this wage gap?

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010075883
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper describes the incidence of training activity and the duration of training episodes during the 1990s among adult Canadians who were not full- or part-time students.

    Release date: 2001-09-12
Reference (6)

Reference (6) ((6 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-514-G
    Description:

    The Guide to the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions, and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, processing, and data quality. The guide covers both components of the survey: the job vacancy component, which is quarterly, and the wage component, which is annual.

    Release date: 2019-06-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-514-G2016001
    Description:

    The Guide to the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) covers the job vacancy component, including a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection and processing, and data quality. The wage component of the JVWS will be covered in a subsequent version of this guide, when wage data by occupation are released.

    Release date: 2016-08-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-514-G2015002
    Description:

    This revised version of the Guide to the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey covers the job vacancy component. The guide contains an updated dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection and processing, and data quality. The wage component is not covered; it will be covered in a subsequent version of this guide, when annual wage data by occupation are released.

    Release date: 2015-11-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-514-G2015001
    Description:

    This version of the Guide to the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey covers the job vacancy component. The guide contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection and processing, and data quality. The wage component is not covered; it will be covered in a subsequent version of this guide, when annual wage data by occupation are released.

    Release date: 2015-08-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1994008
    Description:

    This document describes the survey content for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income data questionnaire and explains the interview process.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1995012
    Description:

    This paper describes the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income data collection procedures and provides an overview of the interview process. May 1995 was the first year respondents could choose to carry out the interview as in the previous year, or they could grant permission for Statistics Canada to access their income tax returns from Revenue Canada and forego the interview.

    Release date: 1995-12-30
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