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  • Table: 23-222-X
    Description:

    This publication focuses on the aquaculture industry: production and value and exports and value added. The data on aquaculture production and value represent the quantity of production and the farm-gate value of that production. The value added account measures the economic production of goods and services from aquaculture establishments.

    Canadian export statistics are taken from the International Trade Division of Statistics Canada and from administrative records collected by the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency.

    Release date: 2016-11-17

  • Table: 21-017-X
    Description:

    This publication contains annual data from 1981 to date on the value-added account for Canada and the provinces. Data highlights and concepts and methods are also included.

    In May, annual measures for the previous two calendar years are subject to revision. In November, estimates for the previous three years may be revised. Every five years a historical revision is done, based on the results of the Census of Agriculture. Although the data are available in late May and late November, the publication is not completed and released until the following July and January, respectively.

    Release date: 2011-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110585
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite some limitations, various indicators for evaluating intellectual property provide useful insights. This article discusses measures of commercial value and their limitations.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800210522
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In a reversal from the 1990s, firms reduced their use of imported inputs early in this decade. However, as import prices fell after the loonie began its sharp increase, import use rose in 2004 for the first time since 1998.

    Release date: 2008-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007007
    Description:

    Results from the Survey of Innovation 2003 raised some interesting questions. First, an unexpected one-third of establishments in R&D services were not innovative. According to the guidelines of the Oslo Manual, innovative establishments are those that introduced a new or significantly improved product or process on to the market or into production, within a specified interval. Second, many of these non-innovative establishments indicated that satisfying existing customers was irrelevant to their firms success. This was very different response from all other types of firms.

    This working paper provides a potential explanation of these unexpected results, as well as an overview of available information on establishments in R&D services (NAICS 5417) in the context of professional services generally. The paper assembles descriptive data to show that non-innovative establishments in R&D services differ significantly from other non-innovative establishments and, while not innovative, they are nevertheless highly inventive. It presents some evidence to suggest that they are venture firms (firms relying on infusions of investment capital rather than revenues from sales to sustain their operations) and proposes a specific set of indicators that would facilitate resolution of the nature of firms in this industry group.

    Release date: 2007-12-20

  • Table: 15-003-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data is an electronic publication that contains a series of tables on productivity growth and related variables for the business sector and its 51 major sub-sectors based on the North American Industry Classification System. These tables allow users to have a broader perspective on Canadian economic performance. They complement the information available on CANSIM which offers more detail, particularly at the industry level.

    Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) are responsible for producing, analyzing and disseminating Statistics Canada's official data on productivity and for producing and integrating data on employment, hours worked and capital services consistent with the Canadian System of National Accounts. To this end, the CPA comprise three programs. The quarterly program provides current estimates on labour productivity and labour costs at the aggregate level for 15 industry groups. The annual national program provides yearly estimates on labour productivity, multifactor productivity and several indicators of sources of growth and competitiveness as they apply to the major sectors of the economy and to the industry level. Lastly, the annual provincial program, as an integral part of the Provincial Economic Accounts, provides estimates on employment, hours worked, labour productivity and labour costs at the industry level for each province and territory.

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data covers four series of statistical tables:

    Table 1: Output, labour compensation, capital cost and cost of intermediate inputs in current dollars

    Table 2: Productivity and related measures

    Table 3: Productivity and related measures for the business sector, Canada and United States

    Table 4: Productivity and related measures for the manufacturing sector, Canada and United States

    Productivity measures the efficiency with which inputs (labour and capital in particular) are utilized in production. Productivity measures can be applied to a single input, such as labour productivity (output per hour worked), as well as to multifactor productivity (output per unit of combined labour and capital inputs). Statistics Canada produces these two main measures of productivity, but other productivity ratios can also be measured (e.g., output per unit of capital services).

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050057894
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The share of resources in our value-added exports is greater than in gross exports, because they use fewer imported inputs than manufactured goods.

    Release date: 2005-05-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050027773
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    The close link between our exchange rate and cross-border shopping has broken down since 2002. More broadly, this is part of a worldwide slump in travel to the US. Meanwhile, travel to Canada from overseas has risen sharply. The increasingly Asian source of this travel has favoured Western Canada as a destination.

    Release date: 2005-02-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 15-515-X
    Description:

    This publication of the Canadian food processing industry provides an overview of industry trends and comparisons with the other G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2004-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper studies the slowdown in Canadian consumer inflation, focussing on the appreciation of the Canadian dollar against the U.S. dollar. It analyses the contribution of goods and services to the deceleration in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) and compares Canadian and U.S. price movements for similar items.

    Release date: 2004-06-24
Data (4)

Data (4) ((4 results))

  • Table: 23-222-X
    Description:

    This publication focuses on the aquaculture industry: production and value and exports and value added. The data on aquaculture production and value represent the quantity of production and the farm-gate value of that production. The value added account measures the economic production of goods and services from aquaculture establishments.

    Canadian export statistics are taken from the International Trade Division of Statistics Canada and from administrative records collected by the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency.

    Release date: 2016-11-17

  • Table: 21-017-X
    Description:

    This publication contains annual data from 1981 to date on the value-added account for Canada and the provinces. Data highlights and concepts and methods are also included.

    In May, annual measures for the previous two calendar years are subject to revision. In November, estimates for the previous three years may be revised. Every five years a historical revision is done, based on the results of the Census of Agriculture. Although the data are available in late May and late November, the publication is not completed and released until the following July and January, respectively.

    Release date: 2011-11-24

  • Table: 15-003-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data is an electronic publication that contains a series of tables on productivity growth and related variables for the business sector and its 51 major sub-sectors based on the North American Industry Classification System. These tables allow users to have a broader perspective on Canadian economic performance. They complement the information available on CANSIM which offers more detail, particularly at the industry level.

    Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) are responsible for producing, analyzing and disseminating Statistics Canada's official data on productivity and for producing and integrating data on employment, hours worked and capital services consistent with the Canadian System of National Accounts. To this end, the CPA comprise three programs. The quarterly program provides current estimates on labour productivity and labour costs at the aggregate level for 15 industry groups. The annual national program provides yearly estimates on labour productivity, multifactor productivity and several indicators of sources of growth and competitiveness as they apply to the major sectors of the economy and to the industry level. Lastly, the annual provincial program, as an integral part of the Provincial Economic Accounts, provides estimates on employment, hours worked, labour productivity and labour costs at the industry level for each province and territory.

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts: Data covers four series of statistical tables:

    Table 1: Output, labour compensation, capital cost and cost of intermediate inputs in current dollars

    Table 2: Productivity and related measures

    Table 3: Productivity and related measures for the business sector, Canada and United States

    Table 4: Productivity and related measures for the manufacturing sector, Canada and United States

    Productivity measures the efficiency with which inputs (labour and capital in particular) are utilized in production. Productivity measures can be applied to a single input, such as labour productivity (output per hour worked), as well as to multifactor productivity (output per unit of combined labour and capital inputs). Statistics Canada produces these two main measures of productivity, but other productivity ratios can also be measured (e.g., output per unit of capital services).

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Table: 35-251-X
    Description:

    Data on furniture and fixture industries clearly show the tremendous expansion period affecting these industries. Several establishments have taken advantage of the favourable economic conditions and the openness of North American markets to increase their deliveries to the United States. Foreign markets have been the driving force behind the furniture and fixture industries' growth in the past decade, since large establishments generally have more resources to break into these markets.

    Release date: 2000-09-01
Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110585
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite some limitations, various indicators for evaluating intellectual property provide useful insights. This article discusses measures of commercial value and their limitations.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800210522
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In a reversal from the 1990s, firms reduced their use of imported inputs early in this decade. However, as import prices fell after the loonie began its sharp increase, import use rose in 2004 for the first time since 1998.

    Release date: 2008-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007007
    Description:

    Results from the Survey of Innovation 2003 raised some interesting questions. First, an unexpected one-third of establishments in R&D services were not innovative. According to the guidelines of the Oslo Manual, innovative establishments are those that introduced a new or significantly improved product or process on to the market or into production, within a specified interval. Second, many of these non-innovative establishments indicated that satisfying existing customers was irrelevant to their firms success. This was very different response from all other types of firms.

    This working paper provides a potential explanation of these unexpected results, as well as an overview of available information on establishments in R&D services (NAICS 5417) in the context of professional services generally. The paper assembles descriptive data to show that non-innovative establishments in R&D services differ significantly from other non-innovative establishments and, while not innovative, they are nevertheless highly inventive. It presents some evidence to suggest that they are venture firms (firms relying on infusions of investment capital rather than revenues from sales to sustain their operations) and proposes a specific set of indicators that would facilitate resolution of the nature of firms in this industry group.

    Release date: 2007-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050057894
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The share of resources in our value-added exports is greater than in gross exports, because they use fewer imported inputs than manufactured goods.

    Release date: 2005-05-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050027773
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    The close link between our exchange rate and cross-border shopping has broken down since 2002. More broadly, this is part of a worldwide slump in travel to the US. Meanwhile, travel to Canada from overseas has risen sharply. The increasingly Asian source of this travel has favoured Western Canada as a destination.

    Release date: 2005-02-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 15-515-X
    Description:

    This publication of the Canadian food processing industry provides an overview of industry trends and comparisons with the other G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2004-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper studies the slowdown in Canadian consumer inflation, focussing on the appreciation of the Canadian dollar against the U.S. dollar. It analyses the contribution of goods and services to the deceleration in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) and compares Canadian and U.S. price movements for similar items.

    Release date: 2004-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2002003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines small producers in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors in terms of output and employment from the early 1970s to the late 1990s.

    Release date: 2002-05-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-504-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Networked Canada is the first comprehensive compendium to be published by Statistics Canada on the information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The compendium has been designed as a profile of the information society, focusing on current trends, as well as an historical overview of the growth and development of the Canadian ICT sector industries. The publication contains two main parts. The first provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and R&D expenditure. A summary of international ICT sector comparisons for selected variables, using recent data published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is also included here. The ever widening use of, and access to ICTs in the home, at work, in schools and by governments is examined in the second part.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-04-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 32-251-X
    Description:

    The most recent issue contains the article "The beverage industries: two markets" by Peter Zylstra.This paper presents recent developments in the Beverage Industries. Following a brief introduction, the industry is analysed in terms of the four component sub-industries, which fall into two groups: soft drinks and alcoholic beverages. The two groups constitute different overall markets. The summary of recent developments is based on results of the 1997 Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM). Other sources are used to provide industry environment and economic backgroun.

    Release date: 2000-04-01
Reference (6)

Reference (6) ((6 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0031M2003010
    Description:

    This document provides compilers and users in Canada and the United States with a fuller understanding of the present practices, similarities and differences between the two national accounts systems. This will enable users to make meaningful comparisons of the published national accounts data. This report is the result of the co-operation between professionals of the two countries in trying to harmonize and improve the respective national accounts, and hopefully, in due course, international standards.

    Release date: 2003-06-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-547-X
    Description:

    Like most statistical agencies, Statistics Canada publishes three Gross Domestic Product (GDP) series. These are the output-based GDP, the income-based GDP and the expenditure-based GDP. This document is aimed at describing the concepts, definitions, classifications and statistical methods underlying the output-based GDP series, also known as GDP by industry or simply monthly GDP.

    The report is organized into seven chapters. Chapter 1 defines what GDP by industry is, describes its various uses and how it connects with the other components of the Canadian System of National Accounts. Chapter 2 deals with the calculation of the GDP by industry estimates. Chapter 3 examines industry and commodity classification schemes. Chapter 4 discusses the subject of deflation. The choice of deflators, the role of the base year and the method of rebasing are all addressed in this chapter. Chapter 5 looks at such technical issues as benchmarking, trading day and seasonal adjustment. Chapter 6 is devoted to the presentation of the GDP by industry, detailing the format, release dates and modes of dissemination, as well as the need and the frequency of revising the estimates. Finally, Chapter 7 reviews the historical development of monthly GDP from 1926 to the present.

    Release date: 2002-11-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-605-X20010028517
    Description:

    As of September 28, 2001 the annual revision of monthly GDP by industry estimates will include major classification and conceptual changes: Change in valuation from factor cost to basic prices.

    Release date: 2001-09-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-605-X20010018514
    Description:

    As of May 31, 2001 the Quarterly Income and Expenditure Accounts will have adopted the following change: Change in valuation from factor cost to basic prices.

    Release date: 2001-05-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0031M2000002
    Description:

    This paper deals with a problem in internationally comparable economic statistics, namely, the fact that countries measure value added by industry differently. The economic measure, value added, is important both in its own right and because it is a component of other economic measures such as productivity. Value added by industry measures the additional value created by a production process. This additional value, created by factors of production such as labour and capital, may be calculated either before or after deducting the consumption of fixed capital used in production. Thus, gross value added by industry is the value of its output of goods and services less the value of its intermediate consumption of goods and services and net value added as the value of output less the values of both intermediate consumption and consumption of fixed capital.

    Release date: 2000-04-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0031M2000001
    Description:

    The 1993 System of National Accounts (SNA) was implemented in Canada in November 1997 and all national accounts series - annual, quarterly and monthly, both at current and constant prices - were revised back to 1961. There were changes in classification of sectors and transactions, concepts and methodology. As well, we removed the statistical breaks in earlier series that arose due to our revision policy. In the spring of every year, we revise, if necessary, our national accounts series for the latest four years. Statistical breaks for earlier periods are removed only at the time of historical revisions, such as the one done in November 1997. This was the fifth and the most comprehensive historical revision of the Canadian SNA series since 1961, the earlier ones were done in the late 1960s, the late 1970s, in 1985 and in 1990. As our historical revisions have been done almost every decade, and more frequently since the 1980s, statistical breaks in the Canadian system have remained only for a short period.

    Release date: 1998-04-01
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