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All (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 14-28-0001202000100014
    Description:

    In the publication Quality of Employment in Canada, the Own-account worker rate indicator is the proportion of the employed population who are own-account workers. Own-account workers are defined as private-sector workers, who are self-employed and either unincorporated or incorporated without employees.

    Release date: 2022-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016057
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article addresses the extent to which immigrants contribute to economic growth. For the first time, the business ownership and job-creation activities of immigrants are addressed. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016375
    Description:

    This paper provides, for the first time, an overview of immigrant business ownership and the associated job creation in Canada. This research is possible because a new dataset has been created in which the immigration status of business owners can be determined. The analysis focuses on two types of businesses: private incorporated businesses and the unincorporated self-employed. Results are presented for immigrants who have entered Canada since 1980 and who were in the country in 2010, hereafter simply referred to as immigrants in Canada. In addition, two entering cohorts of immigrants are tracked to determine the business ownership trajectory during the first 5 to 10 years in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2015031
    Description:

    Canada has a large group of unincorporated self-employed businesses that play a critical role in the early lifecycle of firms. This study presents summary statistics on the importance of a particular group of the self-employed: those whose primary source of income from employment comes from an unincorporated business.

    The unincorporated self-employed measured in this study are those who file the Canada Revenue Agency’s income tax return (the T1 form) and report self-employed income as the primary source of their income. The study spans the period from 1989 to 2010.

    Release date: 2015-10-08

  • Table: 13-019-X
    Description: These data tables provide quarterly information on Canada's National Income and Expenditure Accounts (NIEA), 1961-2012. It contains seasonally adjusted data on gross domestic product (GDP) by income and by expenditure, saving and investment, borrowing and lending of each of four broad sectors of the economy: (i) persons and unincorporated businesses, (ii) corporate and government business enterprises, (iii) governments and (iv) non-residents. Information is also provided for selected subsectors. The tables include data beginning in 1961, and is no longer being released.
    Release date: 2012-08-31

  • Table: 13-020-X
    Description: These data tables provide quarterly saving and capital expenditure data linked to borrowing and lending in 32 financial instruments categories. Financial transactions are shown for 32 sectors and subsectors of the economy, such as persons and unincorporated business, financial and non-financial corporations, governments and the non-resident sector. The accounts are directly associated with the National Balance Sheet Accounts. The tables include data beginning in 1961, and is no longer being released.
    Release date: 2012-08-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper asks how the performance of self-employed unincorporated businesses affects the size of the gap in labour productivity between Canada and the United States. To do so, the business sector in each country is divided into unincorporated and corporate businesses, and estimates of labour productivity are generated for each sector.

    The productivity performance of the unincorporated sector relative to the corporate sector is much lower in Canada than in the United States. As a result, when the unincorporated sector is removed from the estimates for the business sector in each country and only the corporate sectors for the two countries are compared, the gap in the level of productivity between Canada and the United States is reduced.

    The unincorporated sector consists of both sole proprietorships and partnerships. This paper also investigates the impact of just sole proprietorships on the Canada-United States productivity gap. Sole proprietorships in the two countries more closely resemble one another than do partnerships, as U.S. partnerships are much larger than their Canadian counterparts.

    When sole proprietorships are removed from the business-sector estimates of each country (allowing a comparison of sole proprietorships to the rest of the business sector, which consists of partnerships and the corporate sector), the gap in labour productivity between Canada and the United States also declines but by only about half as much as when both sole proprietorships and partnerships are removed.

    The lower productivity of the unincorporated sector (both sole proprietorships and partnerships) accounted for almost the entire productivity gap between Canada and the United States in 1998. Since then, the productivity of the corporate sector in Canada has fallen relative to that of the corporate sector in the United States and the unincorporated sector no longer accounts for the entire gap.

    Release date: 2011-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2010028
    Description:

    This study uses new GDP estimates for the unincorporated sector in order to examine labour productivity in the unincorporated sector and to compare it to that in the corporate sector over the period 1987 to 2005. The level of nominal GDP per hour worked is significantly lower for unincorporated enterprises ($23.20 in 2005) than it is for corporations ($43.40 in 2005). In 2005, GDP per hour worked in the unincorporated sector was just 53% of GDP per hour worked in the corporate sector.

    Release date: 2010-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2009023
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper sheds light on the contribution of unincorporated enterprises to the Canadian economy in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) from 1997 to 2002. The study separates the aggregate business GDP, including its components, into the unincorporated and incorporated sectors. After describing the key legal and organizational differences between the unincorporated and incorporated sectors, including tax regime, limited liability, and number of entities, employment and capital intensity, it looks at the contribution of the two sectors across various industries. It provides estimates for 25 S-level industries and W-level detail for some of the more important industries of the unincorporated sector. In deriving the estimates, the study used the same data sources as those used in Statistics Canada's Input-Output Accounts. Results of the study suggest that the unincorporated sector contributed $82.2 billion in 2002 representing 10.1% of total business sector GDP, a slight decrease from 11.3% in 1997.

    Release date: 2009-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015905
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article is above concerned with results. Concepts and methodologies employed are not discussed. The results of the Canadian TSA for 1992 are presented. The structural changes that occurred between 1988 and 1992 are also discussed. Detailed results from 1988 and 1992 are reported in the appendices.

    Release date: 2001-10-12
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 13-019-X
    Description: These data tables provide quarterly information on Canada's National Income and Expenditure Accounts (NIEA), 1961-2012. It contains seasonally adjusted data on gross domestic product (GDP) by income and by expenditure, saving and investment, borrowing and lending of each of four broad sectors of the economy: (i) persons and unincorporated businesses, (ii) corporate and government business enterprises, (iii) governments and (iv) non-residents. Information is also provided for selected subsectors. The tables include data beginning in 1961, and is no longer being released.
    Release date: 2012-08-31

  • Table: 13-020-X
    Description: These data tables provide quarterly saving and capital expenditure data linked to borrowing and lending in 32 financial instruments categories. Financial transactions are shown for 32 sectors and subsectors of the economy, such as persons and unincorporated business, financial and non-financial corporations, governments and the non-resident sector. The accounts are directly associated with the National Balance Sheet Accounts. The tables include data beginning in 1961, and is no longer being released.
    Release date: 2012-08-31
Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) ((8 results))

  • Articles and reports: 14-28-0001202000100014
    Description:

    In the publication Quality of Employment in Canada, the Own-account worker rate indicator is the proportion of the employed population who are own-account workers. Own-account workers are defined as private-sector workers, who are self-employed and either unincorporated or incorporated without employees.

    Release date: 2022-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016057
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article addresses the extent to which immigrants contribute to economic growth. For the first time, the business ownership and job-creation activities of immigrants are addressed. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016375
    Description:

    This paper provides, for the first time, an overview of immigrant business ownership and the associated job creation in Canada. This research is possible because a new dataset has been created in which the immigration status of business owners can be determined. The analysis focuses on two types of businesses: private incorporated businesses and the unincorporated self-employed. Results are presented for immigrants who have entered Canada since 1980 and who were in the country in 2010, hereafter simply referred to as immigrants in Canada. In addition, two entering cohorts of immigrants are tracked to determine the business ownership trajectory during the first 5 to 10 years in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2015031
    Description:

    Canada has a large group of unincorporated self-employed businesses that play a critical role in the early lifecycle of firms. This study presents summary statistics on the importance of a particular group of the self-employed: those whose primary source of income from employment comes from an unincorporated business.

    The unincorporated self-employed measured in this study are those who file the Canada Revenue Agency’s income tax return (the T1 form) and report self-employed income as the primary source of their income. The study spans the period from 1989 to 2010.

    Release date: 2015-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper asks how the performance of self-employed unincorporated businesses affects the size of the gap in labour productivity between Canada and the United States. To do so, the business sector in each country is divided into unincorporated and corporate businesses, and estimates of labour productivity are generated for each sector.

    The productivity performance of the unincorporated sector relative to the corporate sector is much lower in Canada than in the United States. As a result, when the unincorporated sector is removed from the estimates for the business sector in each country and only the corporate sectors for the two countries are compared, the gap in the level of productivity between Canada and the United States is reduced.

    The unincorporated sector consists of both sole proprietorships and partnerships. This paper also investigates the impact of just sole proprietorships on the Canada-United States productivity gap. Sole proprietorships in the two countries more closely resemble one another than do partnerships, as U.S. partnerships are much larger than their Canadian counterparts.

    When sole proprietorships are removed from the business-sector estimates of each country (allowing a comparison of sole proprietorships to the rest of the business sector, which consists of partnerships and the corporate sector), the gap in labour productivity between Canada and the United States also declines but by only about half as much as when both sole proprietorships and partnerships are removed.

    The lower productivity of the unincorporated sector (both sole proprietorships and partnerships) accounted for almost the entire productivity gap between Canada and the United States in 1998. Since then, the productivity of the corporate sector in Canada has fallen relative to that of the corporate sector in the United States and the unincorporated sector no longer accounts for the entire gap.

    Release date: 2011-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2010028
    Description:

    This study uses new GDP estimates for the unincorporated sector in order to examine labour productivity in the unincorporated sector and to compare it to that in the corporate sector over the period 1987 to 2005. The level of nominal GDP per hour worked is significantly lower for unincorporated enterprises ($23.20 in 2005) than it is for corporations ($43.40 in 2005). In 2005, GDP per hour worked in the unincorporated sector was just 53% of GDP per hour worked in the corporate sector.

    Release date: 2010-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2009023
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper sheds light on the contribution of unincorporated enterprises to the Canadian economy in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) from 1997 to 2002. The study separates the aggregate business GDP, including its components, into the unincorporated and incorporated sectors. After describing the key legal and organizational differences between the unincorporated and incorporated sectors, including tax regime, limited liability, and number of entities, employment and capital intensity, it looks at the contribution of the two sectors across various industries. It provides estimates for 25 S-level industries and W-level detail for some of the more important industries of the unincorporated sector. In deriving the estimates, the study used the same data sources as those used in Statistics Canada's Input-Output Accounts. Results of the study suggest that the unincorporated sector contributed $82.2 billion in 2002 representing 10.1% of total business sector GDP, a slight decrease from 11.3% in 1997.

    Release date: 2009-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015905
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article is above concerned with results. Concepts and methodologies employed are not discussed. The results of the Canadian TSA for 1992 are presented. The structural changes that occurred between 1988 and 1992 are also discussed. Detailed results from 1988 and 1992 are reported in the appendices.

    Release date: 2001-10-12
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-601-X
    Description:

    This publication outlines the conceptual and statistical framework of the services sector in the accounts. The methodology and data sources used to calculate estimates of services in the current-price input-output accounts are described. Specific sources and methods are outlined for determining inputs, outputs and gross domestic product of service industries in the business sector.

    Release date: 2001-07-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0031M2000003
    Description:

    This report examines the 1997 Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA) and highlights the remaining differences from the 1993 SNA, thus providing a better understanding of the Canadian System vis-à-vis that of other countries. Our occasional departures from the 1993 SNA guidelines are primarily prompted by pragmatic considerations, such as institutional structure, statistical data sources, availability of resources and their cost-effective use.

    Release date: 1998-04-01
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