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All (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013024
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines the differences between youth and adults in terms of unemployment inflow and outflow rates, for a better understanding of the gap between the unemployment rates of youth and adults. Data from the Labour Force Survey from 1977 to 2012 are used for this analysis. The article is part of a series of Economic Insights articles providing information on the evolution of Canada's economy.

    Release date: 2013-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2012001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses the concept of expected working life, developed in a previous article, and expands it to include involuntary retirements based on certain scenarios. We also examine the effect of level of education on expected working life.

    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • 3. Layoffs in Canada Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513250
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Layoffs displace a large number of workers each year, and they are known to have lasting effects on individuals' standard of living. This study conducts a comparative analysis of the risk of layoff between the 1990s and 2000s, seeking to identify the factors associated with this risk. It then examines the duration of jobless spells as well as various characteristics of the lost jobs and subsequent jobs, such as the wage, union coverage and participation in a retirement plan.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911113239
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2008, job stability in manufacturing was at its second-lowest level in 27 years, and stability rates between manufacturing and non-manufacturing have never differed so much. Manufacturing workers experienced significant drops in their stability rates regardless of tenure in the firm. The difference in unemployment duration between ex-workers in manufacturing and non-manufacturing has also never been so high.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1992006
    Description:

    Labour force status will be an important analytical variable for many users of SLID data. The document discusses the issues involved in deriving this variable, and details the approach to be adopted.

    Briefly, a value will be assigned for every one-week period, with three possibilities: employed, unemployed and not in the labour force. To a large extent, concepts used in the Canadian Labour Force Survey will be used. Since there are several situations where a straightforward approach to the classification is not possible, additional information will be available to data users who wish to adjust the definitions used.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005033
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Plant deaths arise from failure when firms exit an industry. Plant deaths are also associated with renewal when incumbent firms close down plants and modernize their production facilities and start-up new plants.

    The rate of plant deaths affects the amount of change that occurs in labour and capital markets. Plant deaths result in job losses and incur significant human costs as employees are forced to seek other work. The death process also gives rise to capital losses - to the loss of earlier investments that the industrial system had made in productive capacity. This paper makes use of the plant-death date to provide new information on the likely length of life of capital invested in plants.

    This paper measures the death rate over a forty year period for new plants in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It develops a profile of the death rate for entrants as they age. On average, 14% of new plants die in their first year. Over half of new plants die by the age of six. By the age of 15, less than 20% are still alive.

    As a result, manufacturing plants have relatively short lives. The average new plant lives only nine years (17 years if the average is employment-weighted). These rates vary by industry. The longest length of life (13 years) can be found in two industries -primary metals and paper and allied products. The shortest average length of life (less than 8 years) occurs in wood industries.

    Release date: 2005-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20020016743
    Description:

    There is much interest in using data from longitudinal surveys to help understand life history processes such as education, employment, fertility, health and marriage. The analysis of data on the durations of spells or sojourns that individuals spend in certain states (e.g., employment, marriage) is a primary tool in studying such processes. This paper examines methods for analysing duration data that address important features associated with longitudinal surveys: the use of complex survey designs in heterogeneous populations; missing or inaccurate information about the timing of events; and the possibility of non-ignorable dropout or censoring mechanisms. Parametric and non-parametric techniques for estimation and for model checking are considered. Both new and existing methodology are proposed and applied to duration data from Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2000015
    Description:

    This document outlines the structure of the January 2000 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) labour interview, including question wording, possible responses, and flows of questions.

    Release date: 2001-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001159
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to examine the extent to which an individual's use of unemployment insurance (UI) as a young adult is influenced by past experience with the program, and by having had a parent who also collected UI. A major methodological challenge is to determine the extent to which the intergenerational correlation of UI status is "spurious" or causal. Both the time to a first UI claim and the entire sequence of claims over an extended period are examined using two alternative ways of controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. The analysis is based upon longitudinal data on a cohort of young Canadian and Swedish men. It is found that parental use of UI shortens the time to a first UI claim in Canada, but not in Sweden. Subsequent participation in the Canadian program is influenced by parental UI history. In Sweden individual learning through past participation in UI - not family background - is the dominant avenue determining repeated participation.

    Release date: 2001-01-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 73F0008X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Employment Insurance Coverage Survey was conducted during 4 months of 1998 to provide information on the ceverage of the jobless and part-time worker population by Employment Insurance. It is a survey of individuals sampled from Labour Force Survey participants; these were interviewed by telephone. The report attempts to answer the following questions: How many unemployed persons has insurable employment? How many have access to the benefits provided by EI? How many are eligible for benefits? Those not covered or not receiving benefits are identified. Finally, what are the alternative sources of revenue of the unemployed? This report analyses the main findings from the survey for Canada. It compares outcomes to the previous years' results. It also presents some beneficiary/unemployed ratio data to put the results in a historical context.

    Release date: 1999-07-12
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 71F0001X
    Description:

    The demographic and labour market activity information that is in the Labour Market Activity Survey (LMAS) is now available on compact disk. The files contain all the important demographic variables such as province, age, sex, marital status, education, visible minority membership, disability and immigration status for 60,000 persons each year representing the Canadian population from 1986 to 1990. They contain information about the jobs people held: type of activity, schedules, wages, earnings, unionization, pension coverage, and self-employment. There is also information about unemployment spells, unpaid absences, training and schooling, sources of income and some family characteristics. Any of the variables can be combined with others to create a virtually unlimited number of tables for analysis.

    The three disks contain seven separate files and each file contains about 60,000 samples of individuals. Five different samples represent the annual populations, 1986 to 1990; one file contains 1986-87 two year histories for a sample of individuals, and a second file contains 1988-1990 three year histories for another sample of individuals.

    Release date: 1993-12-22
Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013024
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines the differences between youth and adults in terms of unemployment inflow and outflow rates, for a better understanding of the gap between the unemployment rates of youth and adults. Data from the Labour Force Survey from 1977 to 2012 are used for this analysis. The article is part of a series of Economic Insights articles providing information on the evolution of Canada's economy.

    Release date: 2013-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2012001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses the concept of expected working life, developed in a previous article, and expands it to include involuntary retirements based on certain scenarios. We also examine the effect of level of education on expected working life.

    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • 3. Layoffs in Canada Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513250
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Layoffs displace a large number of workers each year, and they are known to have lasting effects on individuals' standard of living. This study conducts a comparative analysis of the risk of layoff between the 1990s and 2000s, seeking to identify the factors associated with this risk. It then examines the duration of jobless spells as well as various characteristics of the lost jobs and subsequent jobs, such as the wage, union coverage and participation in a retirement plan.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911113239
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2008, job stability in manufacturing was at its second-lowest level in 27 years, and stability rates between manufacturing and non-manufacturing have never differed so much. Manufacturing workers experienced significant drops in their stability rates regardless of tenure in the firm. The difference in unemployment duration between ex-workers in manufacturing and non-manufacturing has also never been so high.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1992006
    Description:

    Labour force status will be an important analytical variable for many users of SLID data. The document discusses the issues involved in deriving this variable, and details the approach to be adopted.

    Briefly, a value will be assigned for every one-week period, with three possibilities: employed, unemployed and not in the labour force. To a large extent, concepts used in the Canadian Labour Force Survey will be used. Since there are several situations where a straightforward approach to the classification is not possible, additional information will be available to data users who wish to adjust the definitions used.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005033
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Plant deaths arise from failure when firms exit an industry. Plant deaths are also associated with renewal when incumbent firms close down plants and modernize their production facilities and start-up new plants.

    The rate of plant deaths affects the amount of change that occurs in labour and capital markets. Plant deaths result in job losses and incur significant human costs as employees are forced to seek other work. The death process also gives rise to capital losses - to the loss of earlier investments that the industrial system had made in productive capacity. This paper makes use of the plant-death date to provide new information on the likely length of life of capital invested in plants.

    This paper measures the death rate over a forty year period for new plants in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It develops a profile of the death rate for entrants as they age. On average, 14% of new plants die in their first year. Over half of new plants die by the age of six. By the age of 15, less than 20% are still alive.

    As a result, manufacturing plants have relatively short lives. The average new plant lives only nine years (17 years if the average is employment-weighted). These rates vary by industry. The longest length of life (13 years) can be found in two industries -primary metals and paper and allied products. The shortest average length of life (less than 8 years) occurs in wood industries.

    Release date: 2005-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20020016743
    Description:

    There is much interest in using data from longitudinal surveys to help understand life history processes such as education, employment, fertility, health and marriage. The analysis of data on the durations of spells or sojourns that individuals spend in certain states (e.g., employment, marriage) is a primary tool in studying such processes. This paper examines methods for analysing duration data that address important features associated with longitudinal surveys: the use of complex survey designs in heterogeneous populations; missing or inaccurate information about the timing of events; and the possibility of non-ignorable dropout or censoring mechanisms. Parametric and non-parametric techniques for estimation and for model checking are considered. Both new and existing methodology are proposed and applied to duration data from Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001159
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to examine the extent to which an individual's use of unemployment insurance (UI) as a young adult is influenced by past experience with the program, and by having had a parent who also collected UI. A major methodological challenge is to determine the extent to which the intergenerational correlation of UI status is "spurious" or causal. Both the time to a first UI claim and the entire sequence of claims over an extended period are examined using two alternative ways of controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. The analysis is based upon longitudinal data on a cohort of young Canadian and Swedish men. It is found that parental use of UI shortens the time to a first UI claim in Canada, but not in Sweden. Subsequent participation in the Canadian program is influenced by parental UI history. In Sweden individual learning through past participation in UI - not family background - is the dominant avenue determining repeated participation.

    Release date: 2001-01-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 73F0008X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Employment Insurance Coverage Survey was conducted during 4 months of 1998 to provide information on the ceverage of the jobless and part-time worker population by Employment Insurance. It is a survey of individuals sampled from Labour Force Survey participants; these were interviewed by telephone. The report attempts to answer the following questions: How many unemployed persons has insurable employment? How many have access to the benefits provided by EI? How many are eligible for benefits? Those not covered or not receiving benefits are identified. Finally, what are the alternative sources of revenue of the unemployed? This report analyses the main findings from the survey for Canada. It compares outcomes to the previous years' results. It also presents some beneficiary/unemployed ratio data to put the results in a historical context.

    Release date: 1999-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1998001
    Description:

    This study addresses the labour market adjustment of immigrants in Canada and specifically, employment stability. It uses data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1998-12-30
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

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