Keyword search

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (23)

All (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2019003
    Description:

    This paper describes the changes in the methodology for estimating the telephone services index.

    Release date: 2019-04-30

  • Table: 62-001-X
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census agglomeration
    Description: This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
    Release date: 2018-05-18

  • Public use microdata: 56M0001X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada was approached by Stentor Resource Centre Incorporated to conduct a survey to monitor the telephone penetration rates across Canada. The survey determines if the respondents have a telephone line in their residence. If they do not have a telephone line, information is collected as to the reasons why. Information is also collected on the income characteristics of the selected households.

    The management of the survey was transferred from Stentor to Bell Canada in the Fall of 1998.

    The Labour Force Survey (LFS) supplementary capacity is used to conduct this biannual survey. A sample of approximately 44,000 respondents is used for this survey (five out of six rotation groups). The survey data are collected using Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI). The first data collection procedure took place during November's LFS week in 1996.

    This microdata file is prepared biannually and contains the variables from the survey, plus geographical variables from the LFS (province, census metropolitan area, urban/rural breakdown). No other variables from the LFS are added to the file.

    Release date: 2014-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110420
    Description:

    Most major survey research organizations in the United States and Canada do not include wireless telephone numbers when conducting random-digit-dialed (RDD) household telephone surveys. In this paper, we offer the most up-to-date estimates available from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics and Statistics Canada concerning the prevalence and demographic characteristics of the wireless-only population. We then present data from the U.S. National Health Interview Survey on the health and health care access of wireless-only adults, and we examine the potential for coverage bias when health research is conducted using RDD surveys that exclude wireless telephone numbers.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2008053
    Description:

    With the growth of the service economy, business support services have become more important to the Canadian economy. Changes in business practices such as outsourcing have been made possible by advances in telecommunications technology. Consequently, the business support services industry, which includes credit agencies, telephone call centres, and document preparation and business service centres, has experienced steady growth. Telephone call centres in particular have been identified as potential catalysts for regional development. Research in this area has tended to deal with employment issues (e.g. job creation) or with case studies of firms or communities. Using an industry life cycle approach, this study examines the changing location of telephone call centres.

    Release date: 2008-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029239
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the launch of cellular services in the mid-1980s, mobile phones have largely been a complement to the traditional phone line but that is beginning to change. Recent statistics show that more and more of those making plans for the evening have not only chosen to stay connected wherever they happen to be, they have also chosen to make their cell phone their only means of communication.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this bulletin is to document the trend in the price to move goods, information and people across space.

    Release date: 2006-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada has been a connected nation for many years. The penetration of basic telephone service and of cable services have been and remain amongst the highest in the world. The networks most used by Canadians are the wireline telephone network, the cable television network, the wireless telephone network, the Internet, and the satellite and MDS television networks. This article highlights the amazing speed at which connectivity is evolving.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via paper questionnaires and personal interviews conducted in January, February and March after the reference year. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces and the 3 territories. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2002-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036381
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's telecommunications service providers and their network infrastructure have kept Canadians connected for over a century. The industry has undergone significant growth and transformation. Statistics Canada data is examined to measure the impacts and outcomes of the regulatory decisions that have helped shape the state of telecommunications services in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-11-01
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 62-001-X
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census agglomeration
    Description: This monthly release of the The Consumer Price Index (CPI) for Canada, the provinces, Whitehorse and Yellowknife, provides a descriptive summary of retail price movements, inflation rates and the factors underlying them. The CPI also contains the following tabular information: latest price index movements for the eight major components; price index changes on one and 12-month bases for an extensive number of components and groups; historical monthly information; and price indices reclassified according to categories of goods and services.
    Release date: 2018-05-18

  • Public use microdata: 56M0001X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada was approached by Stentor Resource Centre Incorporated to conduct a survey to monitor the telephone penetration rates across Canada. The survey determines if the respondents have a telephone line in their residence. If they do not have a telephone line, information is collected as to the reasons why. Information is also collected on the income characteristics of the selected households.

    The management of the survey was transferred from Stentor to Bell Canada in the Fall of 1998.

    The Labour Force Survey (LFS) supplementary capacity is used to conduct this biannual survey. A sample of approximately 44,000 respondents is used for this survey (five out of six rotation groups). The survey data are collected using Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI). The first data collection procedure took place during November's LFS week in 1996.

    This microdata file is prepared biannually and contains the variables from the survey, plus geographical variables from the LFS (province, census metropolitan area, urban/rural breakdown). No other variables from the LFS are added to the file.

    Release date: 2014-12-12

  • Table: 56-203-X
    Description:

    This online publication presents annual, detailed financial statistics on the Canadian telephone industry by province. Also included are operational data such as wire mileage, number of telephone calls and number of access lines in service. There is a textual analysis of the data with comments on methodology, a data quality and a glossary of terms.

    Release date: 2001-04-17
Analysis (19)

Analysis (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2019003
    Description:

    This paper describes the changes in the methodology for estimating the telephone services index.

    Release date: 2019-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110420
    Description:

    Most major survey research organizations in the United States and Canada do not include wireless telephone numbers when conducting random-digit-dialed (RDD) household telephone surveys. In this paper, we offer the most up-to-date estimates available from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics and Statistics Canada concerning the prevalence and demographic characteristics of the wireless-only population. We then present data from the U.S. National Health Interview Survey on the health and health care access of wireless-only adults, and we examine the potential for coverage bias when health research is conducted using RDD surveys that exclude wireless telephone numbers.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2008053
    Description:

    With the growth of the service economy, business support services have become more important to the Canadian economy. Changes in business practices such as outsourcing have been made possible by advances in telecommunications technology. Consequently, the business support services industry, which includes credit agencies, telephone call centres, and document preparation and business service centres, has experienced steady growth. Telephone call centres in particular have been identified as potential catalysts for regional development. Research in this area has tended to deal with employment issues (e.g. job creation) or with case studies of firms or communities. Using an industry life cycle approach, this study examines the changing location of telephone call centres.

    Release date: 2008-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029239
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the launch of cellular services in the mid-1980s, mobile phones have largely been a complement to the traditional phone line but that is beginning to change. Recent statistics show that more and more of those making plans for the evening have not only chosen to stay connected wherever they happen to be, they have also chosen to make their cell phone their only means of communication.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this bulletin is to document the trend in the price to move goods, information and people across space.

    Release date: 2006-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada has been a connected nation for many years. The penetration of basic telephone service and of cable services have been and remain amongst the highest in the world. The networks most used by Canadians are the wireline telephone network, the cable television network, the wireless telephone network, the Internet, and the satellite and MDS television networks. This article highlights the amazing speed at which connectivity is evolving.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036381
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's telecommunications service providers and their network infrastructure have kept Canadians connected for over a century. The industry has undergone significant growth and transformation. Statistics Canada data is examined to measure the impacts and outcomes of the regulatory decisions that have helped shape the state of telecommunications services in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2002008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper focusses on recent market concentration among the various telecommunications products and markets. It also touches on issues such as price behaviour and the market structure of telecommunications services.

    Release date: 2002-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2002007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at the digital divide, commonly understood as the gap between information and communications technology (ICT) 'haves' and 'have-nots.' It examines the many variables, including income, education, age and geographical location, that exert significant influences on household penetration of both ICT and non-ICT commodities.

    Release date: 2002-10-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0009X
    Description:

    This is a condensed version of the study Unveiling the digital divide (Connectedness series), catalogue no. 56F0004MIE no. 7, and covers the same subject matter. The digital divide, commonly understood as the gap between information and communications technology (ICT) 'haves' and 'have-nots', has emerged as an important issue of our times, largely due to the uneven diffusion of the Internet.

    Many variables, including income, education, age and geographical location, exert significant influences on household penetration of both ICT and non-ICT commodities. Thus, divides can be defined for any permutation of the above. In the case of ICTs, divides depend on the specific technology, its timing of introduction, as well as the variable of interest.

    This study shows that the digital divide is sizeable; ICT penetration rates grow with income. Generally, the effect of income is larger on newer ICTs (Internet, computers, cell phones) than older and established ones (television, telephone). Then, using the Internet penetration of households by detailed income level, it finds that in an overall sense the Internet divide is slowly closing. This, however, is the result of the accelerated adoption of the Internet by middle-income households - particularly upper middle. The Internet divide is widening when the lowest income deciles are compared with the highest income decile.

    At the same time, the rates of growth of Internet adoption among lower-income households exceed those of higher-income households. This is typical of penetration patterns of ICT and non-ICT commodities. Rates of growth are initially very high among high-income groups, but at later stages it is the penetration of lower-income groups that grows faster.

    Release date: 2002-10-01
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via paper questionnaires and personal interviews conducted in January, February and March after the reference year. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces and the 3 territories. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2002-12-11
Date modified: