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  • Journals and periodicals: 12-206-X
    Description:

    This report summarizes the achievements program sponsored by the three methodology divisions of Statistics Canada. This program covers research and development activities in statistical methods with potentially broad application in the Agency's survey programs, which would not otherwise have been carried out during the provision of methodology services to those survey programs. They also include tasks that provided client support in the application of past successful developments in order to promote the utilization of the results of research and development work.

    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800254953
    Description:

    Sample coordination seeks to create a probabilistic dependence between the selection of two or more samples drawn from the same population or from overlapping populations. Positive coordination increases the expected sample overlap, while negative coordination decreases it. There are numerous applications for sample coordination with varying objectives. A spatially balanced sample is a sample that is well-spread in some space. Forcing a spread within the selected samples is a general and very efficient variance reduction technique for the Horvitz-Thompson estimator. The local pivotal method and the spatially correlated Poisson sampling are two general schemes for achieving well-spread samples. We aim to introduce coordination for these sampling methods based on the concept of permanent random numbers. The goal is to coordinate such samples while preserving spatial balance. The proposed methods are motivated by examples from forestry, environmental studies, and official statistics.

    Release date: 2018-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800254954
    Description:

    These last years, balanced sampling techniques have experienced a recrudescence of interest. They constrain the Horvitz Thompson estimators of the totals of auxiliary variables to be equal, at least approximately, to the corresponding true totals, to avoid the occurrence of bad samples. Several procedures are available to carry out balanced sampling; there is the cube method, see Deville and Tillé (2004), and an alternative, the rejective algorithm introduced by Hájek (1964). After a brief review of these sampling methods, motivated by the planning of an angler survey, we investigate using Monte Carlo simulations, the survey designs produced by these two sampling algorithms.

    Release date: 2018-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800254959
    Description:

    This article proposes a criterion for calculating the trade-off in so-called “mixed” allocations, which combine two classic allocations in sampling theory. In INSEE (National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies) business surveys, it is common to use the arithmetic mean of a proportional allocation and a Neyman allocation (corresponding to a trade-off of 0.5). It is possible to obtain a trade-off value resulting in better properties for the estimators. This value belongs to a region that is obtained by solving an optimization program. Different methods for calculating the trade-off will be presented. An application for business surveys is presented, as well as a comparison with other usual trade-off allocations.

    Release date: 2018-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800254961
    Description:

    In business surveys, it is common to collect economic variables with highly skewed distribution. In this context, winsorization is frequently used to address the problem of influential values. In stratified simple random sampling, there are two methods for selecting the thresholds involved in winsorization. This article comprises two parts. The first reviews the notations and the concept of a winsorization estimator. The second part details the two methods and extends them to the case of Poisson sampling, and then compares them on simulated data sets and on the labour cost and structure of earnings survey carried out by INSEE.

    Release date: 2018-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2018001
    Description:

    The Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) is a national survey of Canadians aged 15 and over whose everyday activities are limited because of a long-term condition or health-related problem.

    The 2017 CSD Concepts and Methods Guide is designed to assist CSD data users by providing relevant information on survey content and concepts, sampling design, collection methods, data processing, data quality and product availability. Chapter 1 of this guide provides an overview of the 2017 CSD by introducing the survey's background and objectives. Chapter 2 explains the key concepts and definitions and introduces the indicators measured by the CSD questionnaire modules. Chapters 3 to 6 cover important aspects of survey methodology, from sampling design to data collection and processing. Chapters 7 and 8 cover issues of data quality, including the approaches used to minimize and correct errors throughout all stages of the survey. Users are cautioned against making comparisons with data from the 2012 CSD. Chapter 9 outlines the survey products that are available to the public, including data tables, an analytical article and reference material. Appendices provide more detail on the survey's indicators and other supporting documents for the CSD.

    Release date: 2018-11-28

  • Public use microdata: 82M0020X
    Description: The Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS) is a biennial general population survey of tobacco, alcohol and drug use among Canadians aged 15 years and older, with the primary focus on 15- to 24-year-olds. The CTADS is a telephone survey conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Health Canada.
    Release date: 2018-11-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 98-306-X
    Description:

    This report describes sampling, weighting and estimation procedures used in the 2016 Census of Population. It provides operational and theoretical justifications for them, and presents the results of the evaluations of these procedures.

    Release date: 2018-09-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-543-G
    Description:

    The Guide to the Labour Force Survey contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, data processing and data quality. It also contains information on products and services, sub-provincial geography descriptions as well as the survey questionnaire.

    Release date: 2018-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154963
    Description:

    The probability-sampling-based framework has dominated survey research because it provides precise mathematical tools to assess sampling variability. However increasing costs and declining response rates are expanding the use of non-probability samples, particularly in general population settings, where samples of individuals pulled from web surveys are becoming increasingly cheap and easy to access. But non-probability samples are at risk for selection bias due to differential access, degrees of interest, and other factors. Calibration to known statistical totals in the population provide a means of potentially diminishing the effect of selection bias in non-probability samples. Here we show that model calibration using adaptive LASSO can yield a consistent estimator of a population total as long as a subset of the true predictors is included in the prediction model, thus allowing large numbers of possible covariates to be included without risk of overfitting. We show that the model calibration using adaptive LASSO provides improved estimation with respect to mean square error relative to standard competitors such as generalized regression (GREG) estimators when a large number of covariates are required to determine the true model, with effectively no loss in efficiency over GREG when smaller models will suffice. We also derive closed form variance estimators of population totals, and compare their behavior with bootstrap estimators. We conclude with a real world example using data from the National Health Interview Survey.

    Release date: 2018-06-21
Data (11)

Data (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Public use microdata: 82M0020X
    Description: The Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS) is a biennial general population survey of tobacco, alcohol and drug use among Canadians aged 15 years and older, with the primary focus on 15- to 24-year-olds. The CTADS is a telephone survey conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Health Canada.
    Release date: 2018-11-01

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Public use microdata: 89M0017X
    Description:

    The public use microdata file from the 2010 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating is now available. This file contains information collected from nearly 15,000 respondents aged 15 and over residing in private households in the provinces.The public use microdata file provides provincial-level information about the ways in which Canadians donate money and in-kind gifts to charitable and nonprofit organizations; volunteer their time to these organizations; provide help directly to others. Socio-demographic, income and labour force data are also included on the file.

    Release date: 2012-05-04

  • Public use microdata: 82M0014X
    Description:

    Special Surveys Division was originally contacted by the Health Council of Canada (HCC) during the summer of 2006 to conduct the first iteration of this survey which resulted in the Canadian Survey of Experiences with Primary Health Care (CSE-PHC), 2006-2007 survey. The HCC was created when the First Ministers' Accord on Health Care Renewal was signed in 2003. Their mandate is to report publicly on the progress of health care renewal in Canada. One of the Council's goals is to provide a system-wide perspective on health care reform to the Canadian public with a particular focus on issues related to accountability and transparency.

    Once the results of the 2006-2007 survey were released, work began on the 2007-2008 questionnaire. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) joined members of the HCC and the project team at Statistics Canada to begin shaping the 2007-2008 survey. The CIHI, which became a co-sponsor with the HCC, is an independent, national, not-for-profit organization working to improve the health of Canadians and the health care system by providing quality, reliable and timely health information. The research information they produce focuses on health care services, health spending and human resources working in the health sector, as well as issues surrounding the health of the population.

    The 2007-2008 survey differed from the 2006-2007 version in several ways. Along with some content changes, mostly around barriers to access and use of health care, the survey sample was expanded and a sampling strategy was developed to permit national as well as provincial level estimates of survey results. A new questionnaire was developed and tested with focus groups during the month of January 2008, in four cities across the country. The collection mode was also changed from a paper/pencil survey collected over the telephone in 2006-2007 to a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) application in 2007-2008. Collection began in three Statistics Canada regional offices in April and continued until the end of June 2008.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Public use microdata: 56M0002G
    Description:

    This guide is for the Household Internet Use Survey microdata file. The Household Internet Use Survey is being conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Industry Canada. The information from this survey will assist the Science and Technology Redesign Project at Statistics Canada to fulfil a three-year contractual agreement between them and the Telecommunications and Policy Branch of Industry Canada. The Household Internet Use Survey is a voluntary survey. It will provide information on the use of computers for communication purposes, and households' access and use of the Internet from home.

    The objective of this survey is to measure the demand for telecommunications services by Canadian households. To assess the demand, we measure the frequency and intensity of use of what is commonly referred to as "the information highway" among other things. This was done by asking questions relating to the accessibility of the Internet to Canadian households both at home, the workplace and a number of other locations. The information collected will be used to update and expand upon previous studies done by Statistics Canada on the topic of the Information Highway.

    Release date: 2004-09-28

  • Public use microdata: 12M0014X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 14 is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of information communication technology in Canada. Topics include general use of technology and computers, technology in the workplace, development of computer skills, frequency of Internet and E-mail use, non-users and security and information on the Internet. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2001-06-29

  • Public use microdata: 82M0009X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) used the Labour Force Survey sampling frame to draw the initial sample of approximately 20,000 households starting in 1994 and for the sample top-up this third cycle. The survey is conducted every two years. The sample collection is distributed over four quarterly periods followed by a follow-up period and the whole process takes a year. In each household, some limited health information is collected from all household members and one person in each household is randomly selected for a more in-depth interview.

    The survey is designed to collect information on the health of the Canadian population and related socio-demographic information. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994, and continues every second year thereafter. The survey is designed to produce both cross-sectional and longitudinal estimates. The questionnaires includes content related to health status, use of health services, determinants of health, a health index, chronic conditions and activity restrictions. The use of health services is probed through visits to health care providers, both traditional and non-traditional, and the use of drugs and other mediciations. Health determinants include smoking, alcohol use and physical activity. A special focus content for this cycle includes family medical history with questions about certain chronic conditions among immediate family members and when they were acquired. As well, a section on self care has also been included this cycle. The socio-demographic information includes age, sex, education, ethnicity, household income and labour force status.

    Release date: 2000-12-19

  • Public use microdata: 82M0010X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) program is designed to collect information related to the health of the Canadian population. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994. The institutional component includes long-term residents (expected to stay longer than six months) in health care facilities with four or more beds in Canada with the principal exclusion of the Yukon and the Northwest Teritories. The document has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the 1996-1997 microdata file containing survey results. The main variables include: demography, health status, chronic conditions, restriction of activity, socio-demographic, and others.

    Release date: 2000-08-02

  • Table: 53F0002X
    Description:

    Nearly 50,000 or one in five (22%) Canadian truck drivers on the road in 1998 were independent truckers or "owner-operators". However, similar to other forms of self-employment, the net-earnings and socio-economic characteristics of owner-operators have often been ignored by researchers for reasons of analytical convenience or data limitations. New data products recently released by Statistics Canada such as the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) have the potential to fill much of this gap. The 1997 SLID cross-sectional micro-data files offer a limited but meaningful insight into the work patterns of the owner-operator population, complementing and validating well-established business surveys such as the annual Small for-hire carrier and Owner-operator Survey (SFO). The purpose of this study, through a multivariate analysis of the 1997 SLID and the 1997 SFO survey, was to compare the work patterns and backgrounds of owner-operators to company drivers (paid truck drivers employed by carriers). The study found that while drivers may choose to be self-employed to gain independence, owner-operators tend to work longer hours to meet fixed and variable costs, in return for lower after-tax earnings and a greater likelihood of high work-life stress. The analysis also found that the odds of self-employment among truckers were highest among drivers over 40 years of age with no post-secondary training.

    Release date: 2000-06-07

  • Public use microdata: 12M0010X
    Description:

    Cycle 10 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on the respondent's family. Topics covered include marital history, common- law unions, biological, adopted and step children, family origins, child leaving and fertility intentions.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1997-02-28
Analysis (177)

Analysis (177) (0 to 10 of 177 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 12-206-X
    Description:

    This report summarizes the achievements program sponsored by the three methodology divisions of Statistics Canada. This program covers research and development activities in statistical methods with potentially broad application in the Agency's survey programs, which would not otherwise have been carried out during the provision of methodology services to those survey programs. They also include tasks that provided client support in the application of past successful developments in order to promote the utilization of the results of research and development work.

    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800254953
    Description:

    Sample coordination seeks to create a probabilistic dependence between the selection of two or more samples drawn from the same population or from overlapping populations. Positive coordination increases the expected sample overlap, while negative coordination decreases it. There are numerous applications for sample coordination with varying objectives. A spatially balanced sample is a sample that is well-spread in some space. Forcing a spread within the selected samples is a general and very efficient variance reduction technique for the Horvitz-Thompson estimator. The local pivotal method and the spatially correlated Poisson sampling are two general schemes for achieving well-spread samples. We aim to introduce coordination for these sampling methods based on the concept of permanent random numbers. The goal is to coordinate such samples while preserving spatial balance. The proposed methods are motivated by examples from forestry, environmental studies, and official statistics.

    Release date: 2018-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800254954
    Description:

    These last years, balanced sampling techniques have experienced a recrudescence of interest. They constrain the Horvitz Thompson estimators of the totals of auxiliary variables to be equal, at least approximately, to the corresponding true totals, to avoid the occurrence of bad samples. Several procedures are available to carry out balanced sampling; there is the cube method, see Deville and Tillé (2004), and an alternative, the rejective algorithm introduced by Hájek (1964). After a brief review of these sampling methods, motivated by the planning of an angler survey, we investigate using Monte Carlo simulations, the survey designs produced by these two sampling algorithms.

    Release date: 2018-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800254959
    Description:

    This article proposes a criterion for calculating the trade-off in so-called “mixed” allocations, which combine two classic allocations in sampling theory. In INSEE (National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies) business surveys, it is common to use the arithmetic mean of a proportional allocation and a Neyman allocation (corresponding to a trade-off of 0.5). It is possible to obtain a trade-off value resulting in better properties for the estimators. This value belongs to a region that is obtained by solving an optimization program. Different methods for calculating the trade-off will be presented. An application for business surveys is presented, as well as a comparison with other usual trade-off allocations.

    Release date: 2018-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800254961
    Description:

    In business surveys, it is common to collect economic variables with highly skewed distribution. In this context, winsorization is frequently used to address the problem of influential values. In stratified simple random sampling, there are two methods for selecting the thresholds involved in winsorization. This article comprises two parts. The first reviews the notations and the concept of a winsorization estimator. The second part details the two methods and extends them to the case of Poisson sampling, and then compares them on simulated data sets and on the labour cost and structure of earnings survey carried out by INSEE.

    Release date: 2018-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2018001
    Description:

    The Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) is a national survey of Canadians aged 15 and over whose everyday activities are limited because of a long-term condition or health-related problem.

    The 2017 CSD Concepts and Methods Guide is designed to assist CSD data users by providing relevant information on survey content and concepts, sampling design, collection methods, data processing, data quality and product availability. Chapter 1 of this guide provides an overview of the 2017 CSD by introducing the survey's background and objectives. Chapter 2 explains the key concepts and definitions and introduces the indicators measured by the CSD questionnaire modules. Chapters 3 to 6 cover important aspects of survey methodology, from sampling design to data collection and processing. Chapters 7 and 8 cover issues of data quality, including the approaches used to minimize and correct errors throughout all stages of the survey. Users are cautioned against making comparisons with data from the 2012 CSD. Chapter 9 outlines the survey products that are available to the public, including data tables, an analytical article and reference material. Appendices provide more detail on the survey's indicators and other supporting documents for the CSD.

    Release date: 2018-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201800154963
    Description:

    The probability-sampling-based framework has dominated survey research because it provides precise mathematical tools to assess sampling variability. However increasing costs and declining response rates are expanding the use of non-probability samples, particularly in general population settings, where samples of individuals pulled from web surveys are becoming increasingly cheap and easy to access. But non-probability samples are at risk for selection bias due to differential access, degrees of interest, and other factors. Calibration to known statistical totals in the population provide a means of potentially diminishing the effect of selection bias in non-probability samples. Here we show that model calibration using adaptive LASSO can yield a consistent estimator of a population total as long as a subset of the true predictors is included in the prediction model, thus allowing large numbers of possible covariates to be included without risk of overfitting. We show that the model calibration using adaptive LASSO provides improved estimation with respect to mean square error relative to standard competitors such as generalized regression (GREG) estimators when a large number of covariates are required to determine the true model, with effectively no loss in efficiency over GREG when smaller models will suffice. We also derive closed form variance estimators of population totals, and compare their behavior with bootstrap estimators. We conclude with a real world example using data from the National Health Interview Survey.

    Release date: 2018-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201700254888
    Description:

    We discuss developments in sample survey theory and methods covering the past 100 years. Neyman’s 1934 landmark paper laid the theoretical foundations for the probability sampling approach to inference from survey samples. Classical sampling books by Cochran, Deming, Hansen, Hurwitz and Madow, Sukhatme, and Yates, which appeared in the early 1950s, expanded and elaborated the theory of probability sampling, emphasizing unbiasedness, model free features, and designs that minimize variance for a fixed cost. During the period 1960-1970, theoretical foundations of inference from survey data received attention, with the model-dependent approach generating considerable discussion. Introduction of general purpose statistical software led to the use of such software with survey data, which led to the design of methods specifically for complex survey data. At the same time, weighting methods, such as regression estimation and calibration, became practical and design consistency replaced unbiasedness as the requirement for standard estimators. A bit later, computer-intensive resampling methods also became practical for large scale survey samples. Improved computer power led to more sophisticated imputation for missing data, use of more auxiliary data, some treatment of measurement errors in estimation, and more complex estimation procedures. A notable use of models was in the expanded use of small area estimation. Future directions in research and methods will be influenced by budgets, response rates, timeliness, improved data collection devices, and availability of auxiliary data, some of which will come from “Big Data”. Survey taking will be impacted by changing cultural behavior and by a changing physical-technical environment.

    Release date: 2017-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201700254894
    Description:

    This note by Danny Pfeffermann presents a discussion of the paper “Sample survey theory and methods: Past, present, and future directions” where J.N.K. Rao and Wayne A. Fuller share their views regarding the developments in sample survey theory and methods covering the past 100 years.

    Release date: 2017-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201700254895
    Description:

    This note by Graham Kalton presents a discussion of the paper “Sample survey theory and methods: Past, present, and future directions” where J.N.K. Rao and Wayne A. Fuller share their views regarding the developments in sample survey theory and methods covering the past 100 years.

    Release date: 2017-12-21
Reference (33)

Reference (33) (0 to 10 of 33 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 98-306-X
    Description:

    This report describes sampling, weighting and estimation procedures used in the 2016 Census of Population. It provides operational and theoretical justifications for them, and presents the results of the evaluations of these procedures.

    Release date: 2018-09-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-543-G
    Description:

    The Guide to the Labour Force Survey contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection, data processing and data quality. It also contains information on products and services, sub-provincial geography descriptions as well as the survey questionnaire.

    Release date: 2018-09-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-526-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) is the official source of monthly estimates of total employment and unemployment. Following the 2011 census, the LFS underwent a sample redesign to account for the evolution of the population and labour market characteristics, to adjust to changes in the information needs and to update the geographical information used to carry out the survey. The redesign program following the 2011 census culminated with the introduction of a new sample at the beginning of 2015. This report is a reference on the methodological aspects of the LFS, covering stratification, sampling, collection, processing, weighting, estimation, variance estimation and data quality.

    Release date: 2017-12-21

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-005-M2016001
    Description:

    In over 70 years, the methodology and questionnaire, as well as the collection and processing techniques of the Canadian Labour Force Survey have undergone major changes. This document summarizes these changes chronologically and provides references to more detailed information sources. Among the most significant changes were two questionnaire redesigns, which occurred approximately 20 years apart, in 1976 and 1997.

    Release date: 2017-01-06

  • Notices and consultations: 92-140-X2016001
    Description:

    The 2016 Census Program Content Test was conducted from May 2 to June 30, 2014. The Test was designed to assess the impact of any proposed content changes to the 2016 Census Program and to measure the impact of including a social insurance number (SIN) question on the data quality.

    This quantitative test used a split-panel design involving 55,000 dwellings, divided into 11 panels of 5,000 dwellings each: five panels were dedicated to the Content Test while the remaining six panels were for the SIN Test. Two models of test questionnaires were developed to meet the objectives, namely a model with all the proposed changes EXCEPT the SIN question and a model with all the proposed changes INCLUDING the SIN question. A third model of 'control' questionnaire with the 2011 content was also developed. The population living in a private dwelling in mail-out areas in one of the ten provinces was targeted for the test. Paper and electronic response channels were part of the Test as well.

    This report presents the Test objectives, the design and a summary of the analysis in order to determine potential content for the 2016 Census Program. Results from the data analysis of the Test were not the only elements used to determine the content for 2016. Other elements were also considered, such as response burden, comparison over time and users’ needs.

    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X201400114002
    Description:

    We propose an approach for multiple imputation of items missing at random in large-scale surveys with exclusively categorical variables that have structural zeros. Our approach is to use mixtures of multinomial distributions as imputation engines, accounting for structural zeros by conceiving of the observed data as a truncated sample from a hypothetical population without structural zeros. This approach has several appealing features: imputations are generated from coherent, Bayesian joint models that automatically capture complex dependencies and readily scale to large numbers of variables. We outline a Gibbs sampling algorithm for implementing the approach, and we illustrate its potential with a repeated sampling study using public use census microdata from the state of New York, U.S.A.

    Release date: 2014-06-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X201300211888
    Description:

    When the study variables are functional and storage capacities are limited or transmission costs are high, using survey techniques to select a portion of the observations of the population is an interesting alternative to using signal compression techniques. In this context of functional data, our focus in this study is on estimating the mean electricity consumption curve over a one-week period. We compare different estimation strategies that take account of a piece of auxiliary information such as the mean consumption for the previous period. The first strategy consists in using a simple random sampling design without replacement, then incorporating the auxiliary information into the estimator by introducing a functional linear model. The second approach consists in incorporating the auxiliary information into the sampling designs by considering unequal probability designs, such as stratified and pi designs. We then address the issue of constructing confidence bands for these estimators of the mean. When effective estimators of the covariance function are available and the mean estimator satisfies a functional central limit theorem, it is possible to use a fast technique for constructing confidence bands, based on the simulation of Gaussian processes. This approach is compared with bootstrap techniques that have been adapted to take account of the functional nature of the data.

    Release date: 2014-01-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 99-001-X2011001
    Description:

    The National Household Survey User Guide is a reference document that describes the various phases of the National Household Survey (NHS). It provides an overview of the 2011 NHS content, sampling design and collection, data processing, data quality assessment and data dissemination. The National Household Survey User Guide may be useful to both new and experienced users who wish to familiarize themselves with and find specific information about the 2011 NHS.

    Release date: 2013-05-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X201200211758
    Description:

    This paper develops two Bayesian methods for inference about finite population quantiles of continuous survey variables from unequal probability sampling. The first method estimates cumulative distribution functions of the continuous survey variable by fitting a number of probit penalized spline regression models on the inclusion probabilities. The finite population quantiles are then obtained by inverting the estimated distribution function. This method is quite computationally demanding. The second method predicts non-sampled values by assuming a smoothly-varying relationship between the continuous survey variable and the probability of inclusion, by modeling both the mean function and the variance function using splines. The two Bayesian spline-model-based estimators yield a desirable balance between robustness and efficiency. Simulation studies show that both methods yield smaller root mean squared errors than the sample-weighted estimator and the ratio and difference estimators described by Rao, Kovar, and Mantel (RKM 1990), and are more robust to model misspecification than the regression through the origin model-based estimator described in Chambers and Dunstan (1986). When the sample size is small, the 95% credible intervals of the two new methods have closer to nominal confidence coverage than the sample-weighted estimator.

    Release date: 2012-12-19

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X201100211607
    Description:

    This paper describes recent developments in adaptive sampling strategies and introduces new variations on those strategies. Recent developments described included targeted random walk designs and adaptive web sampling. These designs are particularly suited for sampling in networks; for example, for finding a sample of people from a hidden human population by following social links from sample individuals to find additional members of the hidden population to add to the sample. Each of these designs can also be translated into spatial settings to produce flexible new spatial adaptive strategies for sampling unevenly distributed populations. Variations on these sampling strategies include versions in which the network or spatial links have unequal weights and are followed with unequal probabilities.

    Release date: 2011-12-21
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