Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

3 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (4)

All (4) ((4 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity and wages tend to be higher in cities. This is typically explained by agglomeration economies, which increase the returns associated with urban locations. Competing arguments of specialization and diversity undergird these claims. Empirical research has long sought to confirm the existence of agglomeration economies and to adjudicate between the models of Marshall, Arrow and Romer (MAR) that suggest the benefits of proximity are largely confined to individual industries, and the claims of Jacobs (1969) that such benefits derive from a general increase in the density of economic activity in a particular place and are shared by all occupants of that location. The primary goal of this paper is to identify the main sources of urban increasing returns, after Marshall (1920). A secondary goal is to examine the geographical distance across which externalities flow between businesses in the same industry. We bring to bear on these questions plant-level data organized in the form of a panel across the years 1989 and 1999. The panel data overcome selection bias resulting from unobserved plant-level heterogeneity that is constant over time. Plant-level production functions are estimated across the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole and for five broad industry groups, each characterized by the nature of their output. Results provide strong support for Marshall's (1920) claims about the importance of buyer-supplier networks, labour market pooling and spillovers. The data show spillovers enhance plant productivity within industries rather than between them and that these spillovers tend to be more spatially extensive than previous studies have found.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990044946
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article will examine how food service providers and food stores have competed for Canadians' food dollars in the 1990s, and then look at how this intense competition has affected both industries. Each industry has evolved with the objective of improving efficiency and gaining additional market share.

    Release date: 2000-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013493
    Description:

    The objective of this brief paper is to describe recent trends in the merger and acquisition (M&A) activity in the forest products industry in Canada. The two driving forces most often cited in M&A activity are rising capital costs and full product line servicing. Both of these factors have been at play at various times in the history of forest products industry. However, over the last few years there has been a growing national and global perception that current wood supplies would not be able to satisfy future demand. While the trend away from diversification of earlier decades towards the more recent consolidation of "core" product lines may be the stated reason for the many cases of restructuring, it is felt that the real driving force is the increasing uncertainty associated with raw material supplies. This in turn suggests that possible future "inter-regional" M&A activity may help to secure wood fibre supplies - directly or indirectly - and mitigate increases.

    Release date: 1998-02-02
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) ((4 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity and wages tend to be higher in cities. This is typically explained by agglomeration economies, which increase the returns associated with urban locations. Competing arguments of specialization and diversity undergird these claims. Empirical research has long sought to confirm the existence of agglomeration economies and to adjudicate between the models of Marshall, Arrow and Romer (MAR) that suggest the benefits of proximity are largely confined to individual industries, and the claims of Jacobs (1969) that such benefits derive from a general increase in the density of economic activity in a particular place and are shared by all occupants of that location. The primary goal of this paper is to identify the main sources of urban increasing returns, after Marshall (1920). A secondary goal is to examine the geographical distance across which externalities flow between businesses in the same industry. We bring to bear on these questions plant-level data organized in the form of a panel across the years 1989 and 1999. The panel data overcome selection bias resulting from unobserved plant-level heterogeneity that is constant over time. Plant-level production functions are estimated across the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole and for five broad industry groups, each characterized by the nature of their output. Results provide strong support for Marshall's (1920) claims about the importance of buyer-supplier networks, labour market pooling and spillovers. The data show spillovers enhance plant productivity within industries rather than between them and that these spillovers tend to be more spatially extensive than previous studies have found.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990044946
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article will examine how food service providers and food stores have competed for Canadians' food dollars in the 1990s, and then look at how this intense competition has affected both industries. Each industry has evolved with the objective of improving efficiency and gaining additional market share.

    Release date: 2000-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013493
    Description:

    The objective of this brief paper is to describe recent trends in the merger and acquisition (M&A) activity in the forest products industry in Canada. The two driving forces most often cited in M&A activity are rising capital costs and full product line servicing. Both of these factors have been at play at various times in the history of forest products industry. However, over the last few years there has been a growing national and global perception that current wood supplies would not be able to satisfy future demand. While the trend away from diversification of earlier decades towards the more recent consolidation of "core" product lines may be the stated reason for the many cases of restructuring, it is felt that the real driving force is the increasing uncertainty associated with raw material supplies. This in turn suggests that possible future "inter-regional" M&A activity may help to secure wood fibre supplies - directly or indirectly - and mitigate increases.

    Release date: 1998-02-02
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: