Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

3 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (4)

All (4) ((4 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 50F0003X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Travel Agencies in Canada enter the new millennium with many challenges. The gap that they must bridge is a possible erosion of both revenue and customers. The aviation industry has been imposing caps on commissions resulting in the requirement for agencies to sell more product to generate the same revenue. At the same time, selling more product could be more difficult as air carriers and hotels are increasingly offering more direct sales on the Internet. This web presence has enabled carriers and hotels to deliver their product bypassing the travel agencies in the supply chain. There is also increased competition from travel sales web-sites that attempt to attract the business that local travel agents once could have considered as their own. The paper will examine the nature of the challenges facing this service industry and the possible responses.

    Release date: 2000-06-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 53F0003X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For several years, urban transit ridership in Canada has been declining. In the late 1990s, ridership began to stabilize but at a level well below the peaks reached in previous years. Many have postulated reasons for the decline, including the dominance of the automobile, changes in work locations and hours, increasing fares, decreasing subsidies and increasing suburbanization.

    Using data from approximately 85 Canadian urban transit service providers, over a period of 8 years, this paper outlines the empirical results of analysis to measure factors that have affected urban transit ridership. Among the key goals of this project was the development of measures of fare elasticity.

    Demographic, socio-economic and level of service variables were used in the research to explain changes in ridership. A variety of dummy variables was also used to account for structural differences.

    The paper concludes with an examination of major Canadian cities that carry the majority of all commuters in the country.

    Release date: 2000-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014746
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Vast distances, dependence on trade and low population density (compared to the United States and Europe) make transportation vitally important in Canada. The nation's travel and tourism patterns, both domestically and internationally, are a mirror image of Canadian business, lifestyles and quality of life.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013500
    Description:

    "If you've got it, a truck brought it." When you stop to think about it, an increasing number of the things we use are transported to market for at least part of the way, by truck. The trucking industry is becoming increasingly important to the transportation sector of the Canadian economy. This growing importance can be attributed to several factors including the deregulation of transportation, the surge in trade with the United States and the evolving structure of the industry itself. It is within this context that concern for labour issues, including a driver shortage, has been voiced. The demands on drivers have increased, driver training is inadequate and as a result, there is a perceived shortage of qualified drivers. This study examines employment in the trucking industry from 1988 to 1994 by looking at various sources of employment data at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1998-02-02
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) ((4 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 50F0003X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Travel Agencies in Canada enter the new millennium with many challenges. The gap that they must bridge is a possible erosion of both revenue and customers. The aviation industry has been imposing caps on commissions resulting in the requirement for agencies to sell more product to generate the same revenue. At the same time, selling more product could be more difficult as air carriers and hotels are increasingly offering more direct sales on the Internet. This web presence has enabled carriers and hotels to deliver their product bypassing the travel agencies in the supply chain. There is also increased competition from travel sales web-sites that attempt to attract the business that local travel agents once could have considered as their own. The paper will examine the nature of the challenges facing this service industry and the possible responses.

    Release date: 2000-06-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 53F0003X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For several years, urban transit ridership in Canada has been declining. In the late 1990s, ridership began to stabilize but at a level well below the peaks reached in previous years. Many have postulated reasons for the decline, including the dominance of the automobile, changes in work locations and hours, increasing fares, decreasing subsidies and increasing suburbanization.

    Using data from approximately 85 Canadian urban transit service providers, over a period of 8 years, this paper outlines the empirical results of analysis to measure factors that have affected urban transit ridership. Among the key goals of this project was the development of measures of fare elasticity.

    Demographic, socio-economic and level of service variables were used in the research to explain changes in ridership. A variety of dummy variables was also used to account for structural differences.

    The paper concludes with an examination of major Canadian cities that carry the majority of all commuters in the country.

    Release date: 2000-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014746
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Vast distances, dependence on trade and low population density (compared to the United States and Europe) make transportation vitally important in Canada. The nation's travel and tourism patterns, both domestically and internationally, are a mirror image of Canadian business, lifestyles and quality of life.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013500
    Description:

    "If you've got it, a truck brought it." When you stop to think about it, an increasing number of the things we use are transported to market for at least part of the way, by truck. The trucking industry is becoming increasingly important to the transportation sector of the Canadian economy. This growing importance can be attributed to several factors including the deregulation of transportation, the surge in trade with the United States and the evolving structure of the industry itself. It is within this context that concern for labour issues, including a driver shortage, has been voiced. The demands on drivers have increased, driver training is inadequate and as a result, there is a perceived shortage of qualified drivers. This study examines employment in the trucking industry from 1988 to 1994 by looking at various sources of employment data at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1998-02-02
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: