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All (4)

All (4) ((4 results))

  • Table: 45-004-X
    Description:

    This publication contains data on the supply and demand of refined petroleum products in Canada including refinery inputs, production, imports and exports, domestic sales and inventory levels by province and region. Data is available for propane and propane mixes, butane and butane mixes, petrochemical feedstocks, naphtha specialties, aviation gasoline, motor gasoline, aviation turbo fuel kerosene and naphtha types, stove oil kerosene, diesel fuel, light fuel oil, heavy fuel oil, asphalt, coke, lubes and greases, and still gas. It also includes notes and definitions.

    Release date: 2013-08-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity and wages tend to be higher in cities. This is typically explained by agglomeration economies, which increase the returns associated with urban locations. Competing arguments of specialization and diversity undergird these claims. Empirical research has long sought to confirm the existence of agglomeration economies and to adjudicate between the models of Marshall, Arrow and Romer (MAR) that suggest the benefits of proximity are largely confined to individual industries, and the claims of Jacobs (1969) that such benefits derive from a general increase in the density of economic activity in a particular place and are shared by all occupants of that location. The primary goal of this paper is to identify the main sources of urban increasing returns, after Marshall (1920). A secondary goal is to examine the geographical distance across which externalities flow between businesses in the same industry. We bring to bear on these questions plant-level data organized in the form of a panel across the years 1989 and 1999. The panel data overcome selection bias resulting from unobserved plant-level heterogeneity that is constant over time. Plant-level production functions are estimated across the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole and for five broad industry groups, each characterized by the nature of their output. Results provide strong support for Marshall's (1920) claims about the importance of buyer-supplier networks, labour market pooling and spillovers. The data show spillovers enhance plant productivity within industries rather than between them and that these spillovers tend to be more spatially extensive than previous studies have found.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20010095953
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Food manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers have managed to sustain reasonable returns during the 1990s despite the challenges posed by the advent of free trade agreements and the changing eating habits of the population. This article looks at the returns on investment for businesses operating in the domestic food sector during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2001-10-12
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 45-004-X
    Description:

    This publication contains data on the supply and demand of refined petroleum products in Canada including refinery inputs, production, imports and exports, domestic sales and inventory levels by province and region. Data is available for propane and propane mixes, butane and butane mixes, petrochemical feedstocks, naphtha specialties, aviation gasoline, motor gasoline, aviation turbo fuel kerosene and naphtha types, stove oil kerosene, diesel fuel, light fuel oil, heavy fuel oil, asphalt, coke, lubes and greases, and still gas. It also includes notes and definitions.

    Release date: 2013-08-16
Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) ((3 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity and wages tend to be higher in cities. This is typically explained by agglomeration economies, which increase the returns associated with urban locations. Competing arguments of specialization and diversity undergird these claims. Empirical research has long sought to confirm the existence of agglomeration economies and to adjudicate between the models of Marshall, Arrow and Romer (MAR) that suggest the benefits of proximity are largely confined to individual industries, and the claims of Jacobs (1969) that such benefits derive from a general increase in the density of economic activity in a particular place and are shared by all occupants of that location. The primary goal of this paper is to identify the main sources of urban increasing returns, after Marshall (1920). A secondary goal is to examine the geographical distance across which externalities flow between businesses in the same industry. We bring to bear on these questions plant-level data organized in the form of a panel across the years 1989 and 1999. The panel data overcome selection bias resulting from unobserved plant-level heterogeneity that is constant over time. Plant-level production functions are estimated across the Canadian manufacturing sector as a whole and for five broad industry groups, each characterized by the nature of their output. Results provide strong support for Marshall's (1920) claims about the importance of buyer-supplier networks, labour market pooling and spillovers. The data show spillovers enhance plant productivity within industries rather than between them and that these spillovers tend to be more spatially extensive than previous studies have found.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20010095953
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Food manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers have managed to sustain reasonable returns during the 1990s despite the challenges posed by the advent of free trade agreements and the changing eating habits of the population. This article looks at the returns on investment for businesses operating in the domestic food sector during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2001-10-12
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