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  • Table: 27-26-0001
    Description: The Spatial Access Measures are a set of indicators that quantify the ease of reaching destinations of varying levels of attractiveness from an origin dissemination block. There are seven destination amenities which include educational and post-secondary educational facilities, health care facilities, places of employment, grocery stores, cultural and arts facilities, and sports and recreational facilities. For each amenity, there are four variants based on the transportation mode: access via public transit during peak hours, access via public transit during off-peak hours, access via cycling, and access via walking.
    Release date: 2023-07-17

  • Geographic files and documentation: 12-571-X
    Description:

    The Standard Geographical Classification (SGC) provides a systematic classification structure that categorizes all of the geographic area of Canada. The SGC is the official classification used in the Census of Population and other Statistics Canada surveys.

    The classification is organized in two volumes: Volume I, The Classification and Volume II, Reference Maps.

    Volume I describes the classification and related standard geographic areas and place names. It provides names and codes for the geographical regions of Canada, provinces and territories, census divisions (counties, regional municipalities) and census subdivisions (municipalities). The names and codes for census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census metropolitan influenced zones, economic regions, census agricultural regions and census consolidated subdivisions are shown in the classification variants of the SGC. Volume I explains the changes between the current version of the SGC and the previous version that impact upon the classification, such as changes in name, type or code, and indicates how the new and old codes relate to one another.

    Reference maps showing the locations and boundaries of the standard geographic areas in the classification are in Volume II, Reference Maps

    Release date: 2022-02-09

  • Stats in brief: 98-20-00032021002
    Description: This video is one of a series of videos related to census geography in the context of the activities of the 2021 Census and previous censuses. The objective of this video is to describe the classification of geographic areas in Canada. Well-defined geographic areas provide the framework for data collection, dissemination and analysis. This video will provide an understanding of how geographic areas are organized, the coding standards and the differences between administrative and statistical areas.
    Release date: 2022-02-09

  • Thematic map: 98-320-X2011003
    Description:

    This map shows the Statistical Area Classification - Variant of SGC 2011. This map illustrates the spatial distribution of CSDs among CMAs, CAs and MIZs.

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Profile of a community or region: 94-581-X2006011
    Description:

    This table contains information from the 2006 Census, presented according to the statistical area classification (SAC). The SAC groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ) or of the territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes.

    Data characteristics presented according to the SAC include age, marital status, Aboriginal identity, mother tongue, knowledge of official languages, mobility status, immigration, visible minority groups, education, labour force activity, occupation, industry, income and dwellings. Data are presented for Canada, provinces and territories. The data characteristics presented within this table may differ from those of other products in the "Profiles" series.

    Release date: 2008-11-25

  • Geographic files and documentation: 12-571-P
    Description:

    The Standard Geographical Classification (SGC) is a system of names and codes representing areas of Canada. It consists of a three-tiered hierarchy - province or territory, census division, and census subdivision. This relationship is reflected in the seven-digit code. The SGC is used to identify information for particular geographical areas and to tabulate statistics. This volume is designed as a reference and coding manual. It contains tables of SGC units with their names and codes, as well as tables of metropolitan areas. This preliminary version of Volume I will be followed in January 2007 by the final version.

    Release date: 2006-10-18

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-149-G
    Description:

    The National, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions Reference Maps reference guide is available for the following products: Census Division and Census Subdivision Reference Maps, by Province or Territory, 2006 Census and four national maps. The national maps of Canada at a 1:7,500,000 scale showing census divisions, point locations of census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations, statistical area classification and economic regions and census divisions. The Reference Guide describes the content and applications of these products, as well as data quality, and other information.

    Release date: 2006-10-18

  • Profile of a community or region: 95F0495X2001012
    Description:

    This table contains information from the 2001 Census, presented according to the statistical area classification (SAC). The SAC groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ) or of the territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes.

    Data characteristics presented according to the SAC include age, visible minority groups, immigration, mother tongue, education, income, work and dwellings. Data are presented for Canada, provinces and territories. The data characteristics presented within this table may differ from those of other products in the "Profiles" series.

    Release date: 2004-02-27

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0144X
    Description:

    For the 2001 Census, four national maps (covering all of Canada) show the following standard geographic areas:

    (a) Census Divisions, 2001 - Shows the census division (CD) boundaries and codes within each province and territory, on a background of major lakes and rivers. The map also lists the CD names in CD code order, by province and territory.

    (b) Economic Regions and Census Divisions, 2001 - Shows the economic region (ER) and census division (CD) boundaries and codes within each province and territory. The map also lists, by province and territory, the ER names in ER code order, within which their component CD codes and names are numerically listed.

    (c) Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2001 - Shows the general location of census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and census agglomerations (CAs) within each province and territory, with large dots designating CMAs and small dots designating CAs. The map also lists the CMA/CA names in CMA/CA code order, by province and territory.

    (d) Statistical Area Classification, 2001 Census Subdivisions - Shows census subdivisions (CSDs) classified by colour according to the category of the Statistical Area Classification (SAC) they are assigned to. The categories include: component of a census metropolitan area/census agglomeration, component of a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strongly influenced, moderately influenced, weakly influenced or not influenced), or component of the north (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory).

    The scale of the CD, ER, and CD, and CMA and CA maps is 1:10,000,000 (with an inset showing southern Quebec and southern Ontario at 1:5,000,000), and their approximate dimensions are 91 cm by 66 cm (36 inches by 26 inches). The approximate size of the PDF files varies between 1.2 MB and 1.4 MB.

    The scale of the SAC map is 1:7,500,000 (with an inset showing southern Quebec and southern Ontario at 1:4,000,000), and its approximate dimensions are 91 cm by 91 cm (36 inches by 36 inches). The approximate size of the PDF files is 4.3 MB.

    For the 2001 Census, reference maps are available free on the Internet (www.statcan.gc.ca), or they can be purchased through the nearest Regional Reference Centre in electronic format (PDF on CD-ROM) or paper format.

    Release date: 2002-03-12

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0152X
    Description:

    This national map shows the boundaries, names and codes of federal electoral districts (FEDs) according to the 1996 Representation Order, on a background of major lakes and rivers. Insets show more detail for the congested areas on the map. The FED map was produced by Natural Resources Canada for Elections Canada. The dimensions of this map are approximately 28 cm by 79 cm (11 inches by 31 inches).

    Release date: 2002-03-12
Data (5)

Data (5) ((5 results))

  • Table: 27-26-0001
    Description: The Spatial Access Measures are a set of indicators that quantify the ease of reaching destinations of varying levels of attractiveness from an origin dissemination block. There are seven destination amenities which include educational and post-secondary educational facilities, health care facilities, places of employment, grocery stores, cultural and arts facilities, and sports and recreational facilities. For each amenity, there are four variants based on the transportation mode: access via public transit during peak hours, access via public transit during off-peak hours, access via cycling, and access via walking.
    Release date: 2023-07-17

  • Thematic map: 98-320-X2011003
    Description:

    This map shows the Statistical Area Classification - Variant of SGC 2011. This map illustrates the spatial distribution of CSDs among CMAs, CAs and MIZs.

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Profile of a community or region: 94-581-X2006011
    Description:

    This table contains information from the 2006 Census, presented according to the statistical area classification (SAC). The SAC groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ) or of the territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes.

    Data characteristics presented according to the SAC include age, marital status, Aboriginal identity, mother tongue, knowledge of official languages, mobility status, immigration, visible minority groups, education, labour force activity, occupation, industry, income and dwellings. Data are presented for Canada, provinces and territories. The data characteristics presented within this table may differ from those of other products in the "Profiles" series.

    Release date: 2008-11-25

  • Profile of a community or region: 95F0495X2001012
    Description:

    This table contains information from the 2001 Census, presented according to the statistical area classification (SAC). The SAC groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ) or of the territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes.

    Data characteristics presented according to the SAC include age, visible minority groups, immigration, mother tongue, education, income, work and dwellings. Data are presented for Canada, provinces and territories. The data characteristics presented within this table may differ from those of other products in the "Profiles" series.

    Release date: 2004-02-27

  • Table: 93F0050X2001012
    Description:

    This table shows population and dwelling counts summed for the seven components of the Statistical Area Classification (SAC). These SAC components include: all census metropolitan areas (CMAs); all census agglomerations (CAs); each of the four categories (strongly influenced, moderately influenced, weakly influenced and not influenced) of the CMA and CA influenced zones (MIZ) within the ten provinces; and all the territories (all of Nunavut, Northwest Territories and Yukon Territory, minus the data for CAs located in these territories).

    Release date: 2002-03-12
Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) ((3 results))

  • Stats in brief: 98-20-00032021002
    Description: This video is one of a series of videos related to census geography in the context of the activities of the 2021 Census and previous censuses. The objective of this video is to describe the classification of geographic areas in Canada. Well-defined geographic areas provide the framework for data collection, dissemination and analysis. This video will provide an understanding of how geographic areas are organized, the coding standards and the differences between administrative and statistical areas.
    Release date: 2022-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 92F0138M2000002
    Description:

    This working paper provides an overview of census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones, or MIZ, their background and the methodology used to define them. The MIZ classification is an approach to better differentiate areas of Canada outside of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA). Census subdivisions that lie outside these areas are classified into one of four zones of influence ranging from "strong" to "no" influence according to the degree of influence that CMA/CAs have on them. The MIZ classification fills a gap in Statistics Canada's geographic framework and promotes data integration since we expect it will be possible to obtain survey data as well as census data based on the same geographic structure. Studies done with a preliminary version of MIZ showed the potential of MIZ to reveal the diversity of non-metropolitan Canada. Based on feedback received on that initial research, this working paper reports on more recent work that has been done to refine the number and data breakpoints for MIZ categories and to examine the additional variables of distances between census subdivisions (CSDs), physical adjacency and a north-south allocation.

    This is the second in a series of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE) that describe a new statistical area classification that includes census metropolitan areas/census agglomerations, MIZ and the North concept. The first working paper (no. 2000-1, 92F0138MPE00001) briefly describes MIZ and provides tables of selected socio-economic characteristics from the 1991 Census tabulated by the MIZ categories. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the North concept and the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 92F0138M2000003
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's interest in a common delineation of the north for statistical analysis purposes evolved from research to devise a classification to further differentiate the largely rural and remote areas that make up 96% of Canada's land area. That research led to the establishment of the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (MIZ) concept. When applied to census subdivisions, the MIZ categories did not work as well in northern areas as in the south. Therefore, the Geography Division set out to determine a north-south divide that would differentiate the north from the south independent of any standard geographic area boundaries.

    This working paper describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada to separate the north from the south, as well as lines marking transition zones on both sides of the north-south line. It also describes the indicators selected to derive the north-south line and makes comparisons to alternative definitions of the north. The resulting classification of the north complements the MIZ classification. Together, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, MIZ and the North form a new Statistical Area Classification (SAC) for Canada.

    Two related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE) provide further details about the MIZ classification. Working paper no. 2000-1 (92F0138MPE00001) briefly describes MIZ and includes tables of selected socio-economic characteristics from the 1991 Census tabulated by the MIZ categories, and working paper no. 2000-2 (92F0138MPE00002) describes the methodology used to define the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03
Reference (6)

Reference (6) ((6 results))

  • Geographic files and documentation: 12-571-X
    Description:

    The Standard Geographical Classification (SGC) provides a systematic classification structure that categorizes all of the geographic area of Canada. The SGC is the official classification used in the Census of Population and other Statistics Canada surveys.

    The classification is organized in two volumes: Volume I, The Classification and Volume II, Reference Maps.

    Volume I describes the classification and related standard geographic areas and place names. It provides names and codes for the geographical regions of Canada, provinces and territories, census divisions (counties, regional municipalities) and census subdivisions (municipalities). The names and codes for census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census metropolitan influenced zones, economic regions, census agricultural regions and census consolidated subdivisions are shown in the classification variants of the SGC. Volume I explains the changes between the current version of the SGC and the previous version that impact upon the classification, such as changes in name, type or code, and indicates how the new and old codes relate to one another.

    Reference maps showing the locations and boundaries of the standard geographic areas in the classification are in Volume II, Reference Maps

    Release date: 2022-02-09

  • Geographic files and documentation: 12-571-P
    Description:

    The Standard Geographical Classification (SGC) is a system of names and codes representing areas of Canada. It consists of a three-tiered hierarchy - province or territory, census division, and census subdivision. This relationship is reflected in the seven-digit code. The SGC is used to identify information for particular geographical areas and to tabulate statistics. This volume is designed as a reference and coding manual. It contains tables of SGC units with their names and codes, as well as tables of metropolitan areas. This preliminary version of Volume I will be followed in January 2007 by the final version.

    Release date: 2006-10-18

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-149-G
    Description:

    The National, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions Reference Maps reference guide is available for the following products: Census Division and Census Subdivision Reference Maps, by Province or Territory, 2006 Census and four national maps. The national maps of Canada at a 1:7,500,000 scale showing census divisions, point locations of census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations, statistical area classification and economic regions and census divisions. The Reference Guide describes the content and applications of these products, as well as data quality, and other information.

    Release date: 2006-10-18

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0144X
    Description:

    For the 2001 Census, four national maps (covering all of Canada) show the following standard geographic areas:

    (a) Census Divisions, 2001 - Shows the census division (CD) boundaries and codes within each province and territory, on a background of major lakes and rivers. The map also lists the CD names in CD code order, by province and territory.

    (b) Economic Regions and Census Divisions, 2001 - Shows the economic region (ER) and census division (CD) boundaries and codes within each province and territory. The map also lists, by province and territory, the ER names in ER code order, within which their component CD codes and names are numerically listed.

    (c) Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2001 - Shows the general location of census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and census agglomerations (CAs) within each province and territory, with large dots designating CMAs and small dots designating CAs. The map also lists the CMA/CA names in CMA/CA code order, by province and territory.

    (d) Statistical Area Classification, 2001 Census Subdivisions - Shows census subdivisions (CSDs) classified by colour according to the category of the Statistical Area Classification (SAC) they are assigned to. The categories include: component of a census metropolitan area/census agglomeration, component of a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strongly influenced, moderately influenced, weakly influenced or not influenced), or component of the north (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory).

    The scale of the CD, ER, and CD, and CMA and CA maps is 1:10,000,000 (with an inset showing southern Quebec and southern Ontario at 1:5,000,000), and their approximate dimensions are 91 cm by 66 cm (36 inches by 26 inches). The approximate size of the PDF files varies between 1.2 MB and 1.4 MB.

    The scale of the SAC map is 1:7,500,000 (with an inset showing southern Quebec and southern Ontario at 1:4,000,000), and its approximate dimensions are 91 cm by 91 cm (36 inches by 36 inches). The approximate size of the PDF files is 4.3 MB.

    For the 2001 Census, reference maps are available free on the Internet (www.statcan.gc.ca), or they can be purchased through the nearest Regional Reference Centre in electronic format (PDF on CD-ROM) or paper format.

    Release date: 2002-03-12

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0152X
    Description:

    This national map shows the boundaries, names and codes of federal electoral districts (FEDs) according to the 1996 Representation Order, on a background of major lakes and rivers. Insets show more detail for the congested areas on the map. The FED map was produced by Natural Resources Canada for Elections Canada. The dimensions of this map are approximately 28 cm by 79 cm (11 inches by 31 inches).

    Release date: 2002-03-12

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0138M1993001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Geography Divisions of Statistics Canada and the U.S. Bureau of the Census have commenced a cooperative research program in order to foster an improved and expanded perspective on geographic areas and their relevance. One of the major objectives is to determine a common geographic area to form a geostatistical basis for cross-border research, analysis and mapping.

    This report, which represents the first stage of the research, provides a list of comparable pairs of Canadian and U.S. standard geographic areas based on current definitions. Statistics Canada and the U.S. Bureau of the Census have two basic types of standard geographic entities: legislative/administrative areas (called "legal" entities in the U.S.) and statistical areas.

    The preliminary pairing of geographic areas are based on face-value definitions only. The definitions are based on the June 4, 1991 Census of Population and Housing for Canada and the April 1, 1990 Census of Population and Housing for the U.S.A. The important aspect is the overall conceptual comparability, not the precise numerical thresholds used for delineating the areas.

    Data users should use this report as a general guide to compare the census geographic areas of Canada and the United States, and should be aware that differences in settlement patterns and population levels preclude a precise one-to-one relationship between conceptually similar areas. The geographic areas compared in this report provide a framework for further empirical research and analysis.

    Release date: 1999-03-05
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