Keyword search

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (19)

All (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900210835
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines physical and emotional abuse from patients in nurses working in hospitals or long-term care facilities.

    Release date: 2009-04-15

  • 2. Obesity on the job Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910213225
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Obesity among Canadian workers increased from 12.5% in the mid-1990s to 15.7% in 2005, with men and older workers generally more prone to obesity. While low income is associated with obesity for women, high income is a factor for men. A common factor for both sexes is low education. Marriage is linked to obesity for young workers, while it seems to have a protective effect for older ones. In the workplace, obesity is associated with more frequent absences.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810813215
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    More than a quarter of employed Canadians work something other than a regular daytime schedule regular evenings or nights, rotating or split shifts, casual or on-call jobs or irregular shifts. This article focuses on shift work among full-time workers aged 19 to 64 and looks at where and among whom it is most prevalent. Work-life balance, role overload and other indicators of well-being are also examined.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800210565
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines associations between medication error and selected factors in the workplace of hospital-employed registered nurses in Canada. Data are from the 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses.

    Release date: 2008-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110553
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the amount of time Canadians sleep. Sleep is important for our health and for our ability to interact and be sociable with others. Comparing groups of people in different job and family situations can help to identify influences, apart from our bodies' physiology, that affect our sleep. The article also investigates the differences in sleep times consistently reported between men and women.

    Release date: 2008-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200601110367
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article compares levels of work stress - a factor that has been linked to poor physical and mental health and to occupational injury - among various types of health care providers. Associations between stress and selected job-related, socio-demographic and personal characteristics are also described. The data are from the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2007-11-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 83-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) is the first nationally representative survey to focus on the working conditions and health of Canada's nurses. Registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) in all provinces and territories shared their perceptions on a variety of topics, including:- workload- working overtime, whether paid or unpaid- adverse events such as medication errors and patient falls- support and respect from co-workers and supervisors- staffing adequacy- working relations with physicians- their own chronic diseases and injuries- their mental health.

    The 2005 NSWHN was developed in collaboration with organizations representing practicing nurses, health care researchers, health information specialists and federal government departments. The survey was conducted by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Health Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing LPNs, RNs and RPNs in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

    The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006052
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) represents a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Canada, and Statistics Canada.

    The NSWHN was designed to examine links between the work environment and the health of regulated nurses in Canada, and is the first nationally representative survey of its kind. The survey's high response rate (80%) reflects the enthusiasm with which nurses involved themselves in the survey.

    Nearly 19,000 regulated nurses, representing registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) across the country were interviewed on a variety of topics, including the conditions in which they practice, the challenges they face in doing their jobs, and their physical and mental wellbeing.

    They shared their perceptions of work organization, including staffing, shift work, overtime and employee support. Nurses were also asked about work stress, role overload, respect, and quality of patient care. Information about their health status, such as chronic conditions, pain, self-perceived general and mental health, medication use, and the impact of health on the performance of nursing duties, was also collected.

    This document presents key findings from the 2005 NSWHN for each province, as well as for the three territories combined.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • 9. Unhappy on the job Archived
    Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049496
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2002, close to 9% of workers were dissatisfied with their jobs. Evening and night shift workers were more likely to be dissatisfied than were those with a regular daytime schedule. Dissatisfaction was more common among men who worked part time, but less common among women who worked part time. Dissatisfied workers tended to report more disability days than did those who were satisfied with their jobs.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016532
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article provides an up-to-date profile of shift workers and studies their physical and mental health.

    Release date: 2003-06-10
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 89M0015X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a comprehensive survey which follows the development of children in Canada and paints a picture of their lives. The survey monitors children's development and measures the incidence of various factors that influence their development, both positively and negatively.

    Release date: 2001-05-30
Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900210835
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines physical and emotional abuse from patients in nurses working in hospitals or long-term care facilities.

    Release date: 2009-04-15

  • 2. Obesity on the job Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910213225
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Obesity among Canadian workers increased from 12.5% in the mid-1990s to 15.7% in 2005, with men and older workers generally more prone to obesity. While low income is associated with obesity for women, high income is a factor for men. A common factor for both sexes is low education. Marriage is linked to obesity for young workers, while it seems to have a protective effect for older ones. In the workplace, obesity is associated with more frequent absences.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810813215
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    More than a quarter of employed Canadians work something other than a regular daytime schedule regular evenings or nights, rotating or split shifts, casual or on-call jobs or irregular shifts. This article focuses on shift work among full-time workers aged 19 to 64 and looks at where and among whom it is most prevalent. Work-life balance, role overload and other indicators of well-being are also examined.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800210565
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines associations between medication error and selected factors in the workplace of hospital-employed registered nurses in Canada. Data are from the 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses.

    Release date: 2008-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110553
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the amount of time Canadians sleep. Sleep is important for our health and for our ability to interact and be sociable with others. Comparing groups of people in different job and family situations can help to identify influences, apart from our bodies' physiology, that affect our sleep. The article also investigates the differences in sleep times consistently reported between men and women.

    Release date: 2008-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200601110367
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article compares levels of work stress - a factor that has been linked to poor physical and mental health and to occupational injury - among various types of health care providers. Associations between stress and selected job-related, socio-demographic and personal characteristics are also described. The data are from the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2007-11-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 83-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) is the first nationally representative survey to focus on the working conditions and health of Canada's nurses. Registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) in all provinces and territories shared their perceptions on a variety of topics, including:- workload- working overtime, whether paid or unpaid- adverse events such as medication errors and patient falls- support and respect from co-workers and supervisors- staffing adequacy- working relations with physicians- their own chronic diseases and injuries- their mental health.

    The 2005 NSWHN was developed in collaboration with organizations representing practicing nurses, health care researchers, health information specialists and federal government departments. The survey was conducted by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Health Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing LPNs, RNs and RPNs in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

    The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006052
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) represents a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Canada, and Statistics Canada.

    The NSWHN was designed to examine links between the work environment and the health of regulated nurses in Canada, and is the first nationally representative survey of its kind. The survey's high response rate (80%) reflects the enthusiasm with which nurses involved themselves in the survey.

    Nearly 19,000 regulated nurses, representing registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) across the country were interviewed on a variety of topics, including the conditions in which they practice, the challenges they face in doing their jobs, and their physical and mental wellbeing.

    They shared their perceptions of work organization, including staffing, shift work, overtime and employee support. Nurses were also asked about work stress, role overload, respect, and quality of patient care. Information about their health status, such as chronic conditions, pain, self-perceived general and mental health, medication use, and the impact of health on the performance of nursing duties, was also collected.

    This document presents key findings from the 2005 NSWHN for each province, as well as for the three territories combined.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • 9. Unhappy on the job Archived
    Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049496
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2002, close to 9% of workers were dissatisfied with their jobs. Evening and night shift workers were more likely to be dissatisfied than were those with a regular daytime schedule. Dissatisfaction was more common among men who worked part time, but less common among women who worked part time. Dissatisfied workers tended to report more disability days than did those who were satisfied with their jobs.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016532
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article provides an up-to-date profile of shift workers and studies their physical and mental health.

    Release date: 2003-06-10
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: