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All (59) (0 to 10 of 59 results)

  • Articles and reports: 45-20-00022021001
    Description:

    Using the 2016 Long-Form Census of Population and the updated Remoteness Index Classification, this paper looks at the sociodemographic profile of women and girls by the relative remoteness of their communities.

    Release date: 2021-09-20

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2018012
    Description:

    This interactive data visualization tool uses maps and graphs to present person-level information related to the farm population by age and sex: marital status, mother tongue, country of birth and educational attainment.

    The tool also provides information by farm type: country of birth, educational attainment and income of farm operators, as well as household income.

    Data are available for Canada and provinces.

    Note: The name of this product was changed on May 26, 2020 from ‘The Agriculture Stats Hub’ to ‘Socioeconomic overview of the farm population’.

    Release date: 2018-11-29

  • 3. Canada goes urban Archived
    Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015004
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends examines the decrease in the rural population in Canada from 1851 to 2011.

    Release date: 2015-04-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-008-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication discusses the social, economic, and demographic changes affecting the lives of Canadians.

    Free downloadable PDF and HTML files: Published every six weeksPrinted issue: Published every six months (twice per year)

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2012001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In rural and small town areas, self-employed individuals generally operate small(er) enterprises. Most are unincorporated but some are incorporated. These small(er) self-employment enterprises typically provide important services in rural and small town areas. Examples range from general stores to hair styling salons to plumbing and electrician enterprises to dentists.This bulletin analyzes the relative importance of each of these self-employment businesses in rural and small town Canada. It examines the age structure of self-employed workers to determine whether there is an impending surge of retirements among the rural self-employed.

    Release date: 2012-07-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 21-006-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of analytical articles provides insights on the socio-economic environment in rural communities in Canada. New articles will be released periodically.

    Release date: 2012-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411595
    Description:

    This article summarizes the key findings of a recent research report that examined the characteristics of young people who are most likely to go on to college or university following high school graduation and the factors that play a role in that decision. The focus of that research is on: youth from lower-income families; those from families with no parental history of attending postsecondary education; those living in rural areas; first- and second-generation children of immigrants; those from single parent (or other non-traditional) families; and Aboriginal youth.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using 2006 Census of Population data, this bulletin profiles rural immigrants by five themes: immigrants as a percent of the total population, immigrant period of arrival, immigrant region of birth, migration of recent immigrants and finally a ranking of rural regions in terms of the number of immigrants as a percent of the total population in each rural region.

    Release date: 2009-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 92F0138M2009001
    Description:

    This working paper reviews some of the different approaches that Statistics Canada supports to help users segment and measure the urban-rural continuum

    The term urban refers to a concentration of population at a high density. But beyond this basic understanding there is no single universally-accepted view of what constitutes urban.

    Statistics Canada has sought to ensure that users have at their disposal various options to define the urban-rural continuum. This approach allows users to define their own construct of urban in order to meet their specific analytical and policy related needs.

    Release date: 2009-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin's analysis focuses on the effect of "rurality" in determining: 1) water consumption flows at the municipal level; and 2) water quality perception of a household, as proxied by the water treatment choice of a household.

    Release date: 2009-01-23
Data (4)

Data (4) ((4 results))

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2018012
    Description:

    This interactive data visualization tool uses maps and graphs to present person-level information related to the farm population by age and sex: marital status, mother tongue, country of birth and educational attainment.

    The tool also provides information by farm type: country of birth, educational attainment and income of farm operators, as well as household income.

    Data are available for Canada and provinces.

    Note: The name of this product was changed on May 26, 2020 from ‘The Agriculture Stats Hub’ to ‘Socioeconomic overview of the farm population’.

    Release date: 2018-11-29

  • Table: 16-253-X
    Description:

    This annual report provides supporting information to the main Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators report, which presents indicators for water quality, air quality and greenhouse gas emissions. This report provides contextual information on the human activities that have influenced the environmental indicators. Socio-economic information is divided into three broad categories: land, population and economy. Selected data from the Censuses of Population and Agriculture are also provided in the form of regional profiles for major drainage areas and sub-drainage areas of Canada. The indicators are intended to assist those in government responsible for developing policy and measuring performance, while also helping individual Canadians who want to know more about the trends in their environment.

    The indicator reports from 2005 to 2007 can be found below. All later indicator reports can be found on Environment Canada's site: www.ec.gc.ca/indicateurs-indicators/.

    More detail on some of the socio-economic information found in the Environment Canada indicator reports can be found here: National economic accounts: Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Table: 21F0018X
    Description:

    This slide presentation provides a profile of basic structures and trends in rural and small town Canada.

    Release date: 2001-05-28

  • Table: 56-505-X
    Description:

    This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 14 is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of information communication technology in Canada. Topics include general use of technology and computers, technology in the workplace, development of computer skills, frequency of Internet and E-mail use, non-users and security and information on the Internet. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2001-03-26
Analysis (52)

Analysis (52) (0 to 10 of 52 results)

  • Articles and reports: 45-20-00022021001
    Description:

    Using the 2016 Long-Form Census of Population and the updated Remoteness Index Classification, this paper looks at the sociodemographic profile of women and girls by the relative remoteness of their communities.

    Release date: 2021-09-20

  • 2. Canada goes urban Archived
    Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015004
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends examines the decrease in the rural population in Canada from 1851 to 2011.

    Release date: 2015-04-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-008-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication discusses the social, economic, and demographic changes affecting the lives of Canadians.

    Free downloadable PDF and HTML files: Published every six weeksPrinted issue: Published every six months (twice per year)

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2012001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In rural and small town areas, self-employed individuals generally operate small(er) enterprises. Most are unincorporated but some are incorporated. These small(er) self-employment enterprises typically provide important services in rural and small town areas. Examples range from general stores to hair styling salons to plumbing and electrician enterprises to dentists.This bulletin analyzes the relative importance of each of these self-employment businesses in rural and small town Canada. It examines the age structure of self-employed workers to determine whether there is an impending surge of retirements among the rural self-employed.

    Release date: 2012-07-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 21-006-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of analytical articles provides insights on the socio-economic environment in rural communities in Canada. New articles will be released periodically.

    Release date: 2012-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411595
    Description:

    This article summarizes the key findings of a recent research report that examined the characteristics of young people who are most likely to go on to college or university following high school graduation and the factors that play a role in that decision. The focus of that research is on: youth from lower-income families; those from families with no parental history of attending postsecondary education; those living in rural areas; first- and second-generation children of immigrants; those from single parent (or other non-traditional) families; and Aboriginal youth.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using 2006 Census of Population data, this bulletin profiles rural immigrants by five themes: immigrants as a percent of the total population, immigrant period of arrival, immigrant region of birth, migration of recent immigrants and finally a ranking of rural regions in terms of the number of immigrants as a percent of the total population in each rural region.

    Release date: 2009-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 92F0138M2009001
    Description:

    This working paper reviews some of the different approaches that Statistics Canada supports to help users segment and measure the urban-rural continuum

    The term urban refers to a concentration of population at a high density. But beyond this basic understanding there is no single universally-accepted view of what constitutes urban.

    Statistics Canada has sought to ensure that users have at their disposal various options to define the urban-rural continuum. This approach allows users to define their own construct of urban in order to meet their specific analytical and policy related needs.

    Release date: 2009-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin's analysis focuses on the effect of "rurality" in determining: 1) water consumption flows at the municipal level; and 2) water quality perception of a household, as proxied by the water treatment choice of a household.

    Release date: 2009-01-23

  • 10. Bridge employment Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113219
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Retirement is a process rather than a discrete event. Many older workers who start receiving a pension stay in the labour market in some capacity for roughly two to three years before they completely cease employment. And many who quit paid work at one point subsequently return to the labour market, especially in the first year after leaving their career job. For a substantial proportion of older workers, this 'bridge employment appears to be a choice rather than a necessity.

    Release date: 2008-12-18
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 21-601-M2006081
    Description:

    The historical tight overlap between "rural" and "agriculture" no longer exists - at least in a demographic (or "jobs") sense. The purpose of this working paper is to document the changing nature of this overlap.

    Release date: 2007-01-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This activity focuses on the contribution of immigrants to Canadian agriculture, highlighting which countries they come from and why, and what types of farms they prefer.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 21-006-X2001003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this bulletin is to review various responses to "Why are you asking about rural populations?"; to summarize and compare alternative definitions that have been used to delineate the "rural" population within the databases at Statistics Canada; and to offer alternative definitions of "rural" that would be appropriate to each reason for asking about the rural population.

    Release date: 2001-11-19
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