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All (30) (0 to 10 of 30 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018086
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of long-term changes in several characteristics of the jobs held by Canadian employees. The article assesses the evolution of median real hourly wages in all jobs, full-time jobs and part-time jobs, as well as the evolution of layoff rates. It also examines changes in the percentage of jobs that are full-time; permanent; full-time and permanent; unionized; in public administration, educational services, health care and social assistance; covered by a registered pension plan (RPP); and covered by a defined-benefit RPP. Unless otherwise noted, statistics are shown for the main job held by employees in May and cover the period from 1981 to 2018. The main job is the job with the most weekly work hours. Full-time jobs involve 30 hours or more per week.

    Release date: 2018-11-30

  • 17C0011
    Description:

    Annual information is available on the RRSP contribution limit (RRSP room) available to Canadians for a particular tax year. Data may be requested for people with room by new room, unused room and total room. Information is available for the number of taxfilers with new room, their average age, their median earned income, the average dollar amount of new room and the percentage of new room greater than several predetermined dollar levels.

    Data for some geographic areas are available since 1993. The latest data (2017 Room) can be requested for selected levels of postal and census geographies. The statistics are derived from a preliminary version of the annual taxfile provided by the Canada Revenue Agency.

    Release date: 2017-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015371
    Description:

    This paper investigates whether registered pension plans (RPPs) help households prepare financially for retirement or simply substitute for other forms of private saving. This issue is addressed using a panel of 1.8 million Canadian households, from 1991 to 2010, which appear in the Longitudinal Administrative Databank. The analysis controls for correlations in savings across accounts due to unobserved tastes for saving by exploiting the fact that employer contribution rates increase discontinuously on earnings above the average industrial wage, a unique feature of occupational pensions in Canada, the effect being estimated in a Regression Kink Design.

    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015003
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends examines the changes in pension coverage for men and women in the 20th century.

    Release date: 2015-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114134
    Description:

    This study compares the wealth holdings of family units covered by workplace pension plans with those of other family units. It focuses on families and unattached individuals who had no significant business equity and whose major income recipient was aged 30 to 54 and employed as a paid worker. The paper also examines whether wealth differences observed between families with registered pension plan (RPP) assets and other families persist when key sociodemographic differences between the two populations are taken into account.

    Release date: 2015-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010811331
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which family income of individuals in their mid-fifties is 'replaced' by other sources of income during the retirement years. It does so by tracking various cohorts of tax filers as they age from their mid-fifties to their late seventies and over. Earlier work examined this question for the 50% of the population with strong labour market attachment during their mid-fifties. This paper extends that work to include 80% to 85% of the population.

    Release date: 2010-08-27

  • 74C0002
    Description:

    This survey provides information on the terms and conditions of employer-sponsored pension plans. Topics include: number of plans and members by areas of employment, jurisdiction of plans registration, type of plan, public and private sectors, funding instrument, employee/employer contribution formula, benefit method, contributory and contributory plans, annual contributions made to a registered pension plan.

    Release date: 2010-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 13F0026M2010001
    Description:

    Amidst the financial crisis and changes in the labour market, retirement savings plans are subject to greater scrutiny. The retirement income system in Canada stands on both public and private retirement savings plans. This article describes the coverage of Canadian workers by private retirement savings plans. Using cross-sectional tax data from the T1 Family File, we describe the coverage of Canadian employed tax filers aged 15 or more by employer-sponsored pension plans (EPPs) and whether or not they contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) in 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2008. The share of employed tax filers participating in either type of plan declined from 54% in 1997 to 50% in 2008 and this is mainly driven by a decreasing share of employed tax filers contributing to a RRSP. The share of employed tax filers participating in an EPP remained fairly stable over the period.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Stats in brief: 11-008-X201000111133
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Fact Sheet provides data on the labour market, hourly wages, pension coverage and registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) for women and men.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2009321
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from the Longitudinal Administrative Data (LAD) base are used to compare the retirement status and earnings replacement rates achieved by individuals who were, and individuals who were not, Registered Pension Plan members in 1991 and/or 1992, when they were in their mid-fifties. Among men in this cohort, the likelihood of being retired at age 70 to 72 was about 4 to 14 percentage points higher among pension plan members than non-members. Data used for the study do not provide information on why RPP non-members tend to retire later than do members. Among retired individuals, earnings replacement rates did not differ significantly between RPP members and non-members.

    Release date: 2009-12-23
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 74-508-X
    Description:

    This product contains statistics on registered pension plans at January 1, 2003. The major topic covered are plans and members by areas of employment, jurisdiction of plans registration, type of plan, public and private sector, funding arrangement, employee/employer contribution formula, benefit method and annual contributions made to a registered pension plan.

    Statistics on Retirement compensation arrangements are also included and show the number of trusts, the assets, contributions and benefits for 1991 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-09-22

  • Table: 74F0002X
    Description:

    This report is produced from data supplied by Canadian Customs and Revenue Agency. It provides information on retirement savings through registered pension plans (RPPs) and/or registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs) from 1993 to 1999. The data make it possible to identify the characteristics (age, sex and income) of tax-filers who did and who did not participate in these programs.

    Release date: 2001-07-17

  • Table: 74-201-X
    Description:

    This publication presents information on the income, expenditure and assets of all trusteed pension funds in Canada in both the public and private sectors. Data are presented at the Canada level. The publication contains an analysis of the funds based on the size of the fund, the number of members and the type of benefit. It is a continuation of a series of reports produced since 1957. As a single pool of investment capital in Canada, these funds are surpassed in size only by the aggregate reserves held by the chartered banks.

    Release date: 2000-07-17
Analysis (20)

Analysis (20) (0 to 10 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018086
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of long-term changes in several characteristics of the jobs held by Canadian employees. The article assesses the evolution of median real hourly wages in all jobs, full-time jobs and part-time jobs, as well as the evolution of layoff rates. It also examines changes in the percentage of jobs that are full-time; permanent; full-time and permanent; unionized; in public administration, educational services, health care and social assistance; covered by a registered pension plan (RPP); and covered by a defined-benefit RPP. Unless otherwise noted, statistics are shown for the main job held by employees in May and cover the period from 1981 to 2018. The main job is the job with the most weekly work hours. Full-time jobs involve 30 hours or more per week.

    Release date: 2018-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015371
    Description:

    This paper investigates whether registered pension plans (RPPs) help households prepare financially for retirement or simply substitute for other forms of private saving. This issue is addressed using a panel of 1.8 million Canadian households, from 1991 to 2010, which appear in the Longitudinal Administrative Databank. The analysis controls for correlations in savings across accounts due to unobserved tastes for saving by exploiting the fact that employer contribution rates increase discontinuously on earnings above the average industrial wage, a unique feature of occupational pensions in Canada, the effect being estimated in a Regression Kink Design.

    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015003
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends examines the changes in pension coverage for men and women in the 20th century.

    Release date: 2015-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114134
    Description:

    This study compares the wealth holdings of family units covered by workplace pension plans with those of other family units. It focuses on families and unattached individuals who had no significant business equity and whose major income recipient was aged 30 to 54 and employed as a paid worker. The paper also examines whether wealth differences observed between families with registered pension plan (RPP) assets and other families persist when key sociodemographic differences between the two populations are taken into account.

    Release date: 2015-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010811331
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which family income of individuals in their mid-fifties is 'replaced' by other sources of income during the retirement years. It does so by tracking various cohorts of tax filers as they age from their mid-fifties to their late seventies and over. Earlier work examined this question for the 50% of the population with strong labour market attachment during their mid-fifties. This paper extends that work to include 80% to 85% of the population.

    Release date: 2010-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 13F0026M2010001
    Description:

    Amidst the financial crisis and changes in the labour market, retirement savings plans are subject to greater scrutiny. The retirement income system in Canada stands on both public and private retirement savings plans. This article describes the coverage of Canadian workers by private retirement savings plans. Using cross-sectional tax data from the T1 Family File, we describe the coverage of Canadian employed tax filers aged 15 or more by employer-sponsored pension plans (EPPs) and whether or not they contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) in 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2008. The share of employed tax filers participating in either type of plan declined from 54% in 1997 to 50% in 2008 and this is mainly driven by a decreasing share of employed tax filers contributing to a RRSP. The share of employed tax filers participating in an EPP remained fairly stable over the period.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Stats in brief: 11-008-X201000111133
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Fact Sheet provides data on the labour market, hourly wages, pension coverage and registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) for women and men.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2009321
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from the Longitudinal Administrative Data (LAD) base are used to compare the retirement status and earnings replacement rates achieved by individuals who were, and individuals who were not, Registered Pension Plan members in 1991 and/or 1992, when they were in their mid-fifties. Among men in this cohort, the likelihood of being retired at age 70 to 72 was about 4 to 14 percentage points higher among pension plan members than non-members. Data used for the study do not provide information on why RPP non-members tend to retire later than do members. Among retired individuals, earnings replacement rates did not differ significantly between RPP members and non-members.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • 9. Shifting pensions Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910513230
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2006, 37% of the employed Canadian population was covered by a registered pension plan. Defined benefit plans have historically covered the majority of plan participants. Defined contribution plans have recently become more prominent. This article examines the increased prevalence of such plans in Canada between 1991 and 2006 and the factors influencing this trend.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710813193
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    'Do I have enough money to retire?' is a question that older workers have been trained to ask themselves as they consider the transition out of the workplace. The financial tally includes employer pension plans, registered savings plans and other investments, as well as entitlement to public benefits' the Canada and Quebec Pension Plan (C/QPP) and Old Age Security/Guaranteed Income Supplement. These resources are balanced against projected spending and other considerations, such as health, family demands and leisure activities. Take-up rates of C/QPP benefits, co-receipt of C/QPP and other benefits, and employment following benefit take-up are examined for taxfilers in their 60s.

    Release date: 2007-09-18
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2003001
    Description:

    This guide will be of assistance in understanding the concepts, methodology and data quality of the surveys conducted as well as the data analysed by the Pensions and Wealth Surveys Section of the Income Statistics Division. It covers the following surveys/programs:- Pension Plans in Canada;- Trusteed Pension Funds (Census and Quarterly);- Survey of Financial Security; and- Pension adjustment/registered retirement savings plans data file provided by Canada Customs and Revenue Agency.

    Release date: 2003-02-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001003
    Description:

    Initial results from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), which provides information on the net worth of Canadians, were released on March 15 2001, in The daily. The survey collected information on the value of the financial and non-financial assets owned by each family unit and on the amount of their debt.

    Statistics Canada is currently refining this initial estimate of net worth by adding to it an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer pension plans. This is an important addition to any asset and debt survey as, for many family units, it is likely to be one of the largest assets. With the aging of the population, information on pension accumulations is greatly needed to better understand the financial situation of those nearing retirement. These updated estimates of the Survey of Financial Security will be released in late fall 2001.

    The process for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits is a complex one. This document describes the methodology for estimating that value, for the following groups: a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    This methodology was proposed by Hubert Frenken and Michael Cohen. The former has many years of experience with Statistics Canada working with data on employer pension plans; the latter is a principal with the actuarial consulting firm William M. Mercer. Earlier this year, Statistics Canada carried out a public consultation on the proposed methodology. This report includes updates made as a result of feedback received from data users.

    Release date: 2001-09-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001002
    Description:

    The Survey of Financial Security (SFS) will provide information on the net worth of Canadians. In order to do this, information was collected - in May and June 1999 - on the value of the assets and debts of each of the families or unattached individuals in the sample. The value of one particular asset is not easy to determine, or to estimate. That is the present value of the amount people have accrued in their employer pension plan. These plans are often called registered pension plans (RPP), as they must be registered with Canada Customs and Revenue Agency. Although some RPP members receive estimates of the value of their accrued benefit, in most cases plan members would not know this amount. However, it is likely to be one of the largest assets for many family units. And, as the baby boomers approach retirement, information on their pension accumulations is much needed to better understand their financial readiness for this transition.

    The intent of this paper is to: present, for discussion, a methodology for estimating the present value of employer pension plan benefits for the Survey of Financial Security; and to seek feedback on the proposed methodology. This document proposes a methodology for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits for the following groups:a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0010X
    Description:

    The publication guides the user through the vast array of labour market and income data sources. It offers detailed descriptions of the various surveys, including the data collected. A summary chart gives snapshot information for comparisons.

    Release date: 2000-09-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M1999003
    Description:

    This paper presents a proposal for conducting a Canadian asset and debt survey. The first step in preparing this proposal was the release, in February 1997, of a document entitled Towards a new Canadian asset and debt survey whose intent was to elicit feedback on the initial thinking regarding the content of the survey.

    This paper reviews the conceptual framework for a new asset and debt survey, data requirements, survey design, collection methodology and testing. It provides also an overview of the anticipated data processing system, describes the analysis and dissemination plan (analytical products and microdata files), and identifies the survey costs and major milestones. Finally, it presents the management/coordination approach used.

    Release date: 1999-03-23
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