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All (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Public use microdata: 71M0016X
    Description:

    The Public Service Employee Survey was designed to solicit the views of Public Service employees on their work environment and overall job satisfaction. Employees expressed their opinions on their work units, their communications with their supervisors, skills and career aspirations, client services and labour management relations. General information such as age, gender, years of service and province of work were collected and questions were asked on specific themes such as staffing fairness, official languages, health and safety, harassment and discrimination and retention issues. The results were aggregated at the department and Public Service-wide levels. The survey ensures a measurement capacity between the 1999, 2002 and 2005 questionnaires.

    In 2008, the 2005 questionnaire was used as the basis for the survey. New questions were added to construct an employee engagement model that will be used to evaluate each organization. As well, the scale of the response category was increased from 4 to 5 to include a neutral category.

    Release date: 2012-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413207
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2006 Census hit the streets during the hottest labour market in a generation, with many regional unemployment rates at long-term lows and wage increases outstripping price hikes. While technological advances reduced manpower needs, tens of thousands of temporary workers were still required which proved to be a problem in many areas. Census managers extended the collection period and moved an unprecedented number of enumerators across regions to attain acceptable data quality while remaining within budget.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007053
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the evolution of employment in the Canada's federal government from 1995 to 2006. It also offers early analysis of occupational categories, gender and age of the Core (federal) Public Administration employees.

    Release date: 2007-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2004003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report looks at the distribution of recent immigrants in census metropolitan areas (CMAs), implications on public services in urban areas and the employment characteristics of immigrants.

    Release date: 2004-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000148
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There is a general sense that the 1990s labour market was unique. It has been characterized by notions such as "downsizing", "technological revolution", "the knowledge-based economy", "rising job instability", and so on. This paper provides an extensive overview of the performance of the 1990s labour market, and asks just how different it was from the 1980s. It goes on to ask if the facts are consistent with many common beliefs and explanations. The paper focuses on (a) macro-level labour market outcomes, and (b) distributional outcomes. Macro-level topics include: has the nature of work changed dramatically in the 1990s? has there been a continued ratcheting up of unemployment? have we witnessed rising job instability and increased levels of layoffs? did company downsizing increase in the 1990s? why did per capita income growth stall in the 1990s? for a worker with a given level of human capital, has there been a deterioration in labour market outcomes?

    Much of the focus in the labour market over the 1980s and 1990s was on distributional outcomes - who is winning and who is losing. Some of the distributional outcomes of the 1990s labour market addressed in the paper include: outcomes for men and women; changes in the relative wages of the highly educated and earnings inequality; trends in the rate of low-income; the changing outcomes for recent labour market entrants, including young people and immigrants; and the extent to which technological change plays a major role in these outcomes.

    The paper concludes with a discussion of the overall performance of the 1990s labour market as compared to the 1980s.

    Release date: 2000-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19980034139
    Geography: Canada
    Description: This article examines differences by occupation in daily cigarette smoking prevalence and intensity among full-time workers, and how these differences are associated with smoking restrictions at work.
    Release date: 1999-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19980034140
    Geography: Canada
    Description: This article describes work stress experienced by the employed population. It examines associations between job strain, job insecurity, physical demands, low co-worker support and low supervisor support, and four health outcomes: migraine, work injury, high blood pressure and psychological distress.
    Release date: 1999-01-12

  • 8. Job stability Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044042
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article investigates the common claim that jobs are less stable in the service sector. It also contests the view that overall job stability has declined as the economy has shifted toward employment in services. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer published in May 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014019
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The goal of this chapter is to document how the young fare in today's labour market. The focus is on young men for two reasons. First, most of the recent literature on the growth of earnings inequality has concentrated on the study of male earnings. This approach is chosen because one of the questions addressed is about the consequences of the growth of earnings inequality on youth age-earnings profiles. Second, and more importantly, the labour market behaviour of women is much more complicated to examine because their participation rates have changed dramatically over the last twenty years.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980024000
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    It is common knowledge that the services sector has over the past few decades become the largest employer in Canada. From 1976 to 1996, the services industries have grown from 67% to 75% of employment, with most of this growth taking place in consumer and business services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Public use microdata: 71M0016X
    Description:

    The Public Service Employee Survey was designed to solicit the views of Public Service employees on their work environment and overall job satisfaction. Employees expressed their opinions on their work units, their communications with their supervisors, skills and career aspirations, client services and labour management relations. General information such as age, gender, years of service and province of work were collected and questions were asked on specific themes such as staffing fairness, official languages, health and safety, harassment and discrimination and retention issues. The results were aggregated at the department and Public Service-wide levels. The survey ensures a measurement capacity between the 1999, 2002 and 2005 questionnaires.

    In 2008, the 2005 questionnaire was used as the basis for the survey. New questions were added to construct an employee engagement model that will be used to evaluate each organization. As well, the scale of the response category was increased from 4 to 5 to include a neutral category.

    Release date: 2012-03-19

  • Table: 71-539-X
    Description:

    This publication about worker turnover in the Canadian economy provides comprehensive data for the first time on job separations and hiring, with emphasis on permanent separations, temporary separations, quits and layoffs.

    Release date: 1998-06-25
Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413207
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2006 Census hit the streets during the hottest labour market in a generation, with many regional unemployment rates at long-term lows and wage increases outstripping price hikes. While technological advances reduced manpower needs, tens of thousands of temporary workers were still required which proved to be a problem in many areas. Census managers extended the collection period and moved an unprecedented number of enumerators across regions to attain acceptable data quality while remaining within budget.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007053
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the evolution of employment in the Canada's federal government from 1995 to 2006. It also offers early analysis of occupational categories, gender and age of the Core (federal) Public Administration employees.

    Release date: 2007-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2004003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report looks at the distribution of recent immigrants in census metropolitan areas (CMAs), implications on public services in urban areas and the employment characteristics of immigrants.

    Release date: 2004-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000148
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There is a general sense that the 1990s labour market was unique. It has been characterized by notions such as "downsizing", "technological revolution", "the knowledge-based economy", "rising job instability", and so on. This paper provides an extensive overview of the performance of the 1990s labour market, and asks just how different it was from the 1980s. It goes on to ask if the facts are consistent with many common beliefs and explanations. The paper focuses on (a) macro-level labour market outcomes, and (b) distributional outcomes. Macro-level topics include: has the nature of work changed dramatically in the 1990s? has there been a continued ratcheting up of unemployment? have we witnessed rising job instability and increased levels of layoffs? did company downsizing increase in the 1990s? why did per capita income growth stall in the 1990s? for a worker with a given level of human capital, has there been a deterioration in labour market outcomes?

    Much of the focus in the labour market over the 1980s and 1990s was on distributional outcomes - who is winning and who is losing. Some of the distributional outcomes of the 1990s labour market addressed in the paper include: outcomes for men and women; changes in the relative wages of the highly educated and earnings inequality; trends in the rate of low-income; the changing outcomes for recent labour market entrants, including young people and immigrants; and the extent to which technological change plays a major role in these outcomes.

    The paper concludes with a discussion of the overall performance of the 1990s labour market as compared to the 1980s.

    Release date: 2000-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19980034139
    Geography: Canada
    Description: This article examines differences by occupation in daily cigarette smoking prevalence and intensity among full-time workers, and how these differences are associated with smoking restrictions at work.
    Release date: 1999-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19980034140
    Geography: Canada
    Description: This article describes work stress experienced by the employed population. It examines associations between job strain, job insecurity, physical demands, low co-worker support and low supervisor support, and four health outcomes: migraine, work injury, high blood pressure and psychological distress.
    Release date: 1999-01-12

  • 7. Job stability Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044042
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article investigates the common claim that jobs are less stable in the service sector. It also contests the view that overall job stability has declined as the economy has shifted toward employment in services. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer published in May 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014019
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The goal of this chapter is to document how the young fare in today's labour market. The focus is on young men for two reasons. First, most of the recent literature on the growth of earnings inequality has concentrated on the study of male earnings. This approach is chosen because one of the questions addressed is about the consequences of the growth of earnings inequality on youth age-earnings profiles. Second, and more importantly, the labour market behaviour of women is much more complicated to examine because their participation rates have changed dramatically over the last twenty years.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980024000
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    It is common knowledge that the services sector has over the past few decades become the largest employer in Canada. From 1976 to 1996, the services industries have grown from 67% to 75% of employment, with most of this growth taking place in consumer and business services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997109
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In addition to confirming a wage gap between Canadian workers as a whole and those of Aboriginal origin, our research also generated new findings: there is greater disparity in the distribution of wages among Aboriginals than among Canadian workers as a whole, even after allowing for demographic differences.

    Our analysis does not stop there. Indeed, this analysis can hide considerable wage dispersions between Aboriginal groups since appreciable wage gaps were noted between these groups. Having said this, wage dispersion is most likely greater for certain Aboriginal groups than others. Since this aspect has never been studied before, the purpose of this paper is to document differences in wage dispersion for the four main Aboriginal groups. Our results show that North American Indians living on reserves are the most disadvantaged Aboriginal group because their earnings are substantially lower than those of the other groups.

    Release date: 1998-01-14
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Classification: 12-565-X
    Description:

    The Standard Occupational Classification provides a systematic classification structure to identify and categorize the entire range of occupational activity in Canada. This up-to-date classification is based upon, and easily related to, the National Occupational Classification. It consists of 10 broad occupational categories which are subdivided into major groups, minor groups and unit groups. Definitions and occupational titles are provided for each unit group. An alphabetical index of the occupational titles classified to the unit group level is also included.

    Release date: 1993-08-23
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