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All (5) ((5 results))

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this paper, we provide an international comparison of the growth in Canadian and U.S. manufacturing industries over the 1961-to-2003 period. We find that average annual growth rates of labour productivity growth were almost identical in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors during this period. But the sources of labour productivity growth differed in the two countries. Intermediate input deepening was a more important source of labour productivity growth in Canada than in the United States, while investment in capital and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth were more important in the United States than in Canada. After 1996, labour productivity growth in Canada was lower than in the United States. The post-1996 slower labour productivity growth in Canada relative to the United States was due to slower growth in MFP and slower growth in capital intensity. The slower MFP growth in Canada accounted for 60% of Canada - United States labour productivity growth difference, and slower growth in capital intensity accounted for 30%. The slower MFP growth in the Canadian manufacturing sector relative to that of the United States after 1996 was due to lower MFP growth in the computer and electronic products industry. The slower growth in capital'labour ratio in the Canadian manufacturing compared with the United States after 1996 is related to the changes in relative prices of capital and labour inputs in the two countries.

    Release date: 2007-12-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2007014
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) of Statistics Canada maintain two multifactor productivity (MFP) programs.

    The Major Sector Multifactor Productivity Program develops the indexes of MFP for the total business sector and major industry groups in the business sector.

    The Industry Multifactor Productivity Program or the Industry KLEMS Productivity Program develops the industry productivity database that includes MFP indexes, output, capital (K), labour (L), energy (E), materials (M) and services (S) inputs for the individual industries of the business sector at various levels of industry aggregation. This paper describes the methodologies and data sources that are used to construct the major sector MFP indexes and the industry productivity database (or the KLEMS database). More specifically, this paper is meant to:provide a background of the major sector MFP program and the industry KLEMS productivity program;present the methodology for measuring MFP;describe the data sources and data available from the MFP programs;present a quality rating of the industry KLEMS productivity data; anddescribe the research agenda related to the MFP program.

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-002-M2001001
    Description:

    This document describes the sources, concepts and methods utilized by the Canadian Productivity Accounts and discusses how they compare with their U.S. counterparts.

    Release date: 2004-12-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-002-M
    Description:

    This series of articles provides users with an understanding of the notion of productivity and the underlying statistical standards, concepts, and methods used to compile the productivity statistics.

    This series enables users to better judge the economic significance, quality and accuracy of the productivity statistics. It is particularly designed for those who regularly use the productivity estimates, such as academics and economic and financial analysts. It is also a reference for others who use the productivity figures less frequently, such as students of economics.

    Release date: 2004-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M1996003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity analysis is one of the major foundations of the analysis of long-term economic growth. It is important to study productivity in order to identify the factors that contribute to it and to explore the relationship that exists between productivity, growth and international competitiveness.

    Statistics Canada produces partial productivity indexes for some 30 industries and the business sector of the economy on an annual basis. However, little is known about the real output, productivity, and price trends in the construction industry. Four opportunities for productivity research in the construction industry are evident, (a) investigation of the available productivity measures, (b) alternative approaches to the implicit methods currently used in the compilation of output price indexes, (c) estimation of productivity within particular sectors of the construction industry, and (d) comparison of productivity on an interprovincial or international basis.

    In this paper we will focus on the first two of the four alternatives and will give examples of the last two. In particular, by formalizing the adjustments that are made to the input factors used in the development of output indexes, we contend that the result will be more impartial and enduring. Generally, our goal is to investigate and promote measures that will be available and attractive to the construction industry as it begins to demand more electronic information. The purpose is to derive, eventually, some new productivity estimates based upon the best available statistics.

    Release date: 1997-05-05
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  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this paper, we provide an international comparison of the growth in Canadian and U.S. manufacturing industries over the 1961-to-2003 period. We find that average annual growth rates of labour productivity growth were almost identical in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors during this period. But the sources of labour productivity growth differed in the two countries. Intermediate input deepening was a more important source of labour productivity growth in Canada than in the United States, while investment in capital and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth were more important in the United States than in Canada. After 1996, labour productivity growth in Canada was lower than in the United States. The post-1996 slower labour productivity growth in Canada relative to the United States was due to slower growth in MFP and slower growth in capital intensity. The slower MFP growth in Canada accounted for 60% of Canada - United States labour productivity growth difference, and slower growth in capital intensity accounted for 30%. The slower MFP growth in the Canadian manufacturing sector relative to that of the United States after 1996 was due to lower MFP growth in the computer and electronic products industry. The slower growth in capital'labour ratio in the Canadian manufacturing compared with the United States after 1996 is related to the changes in relative prices of capital and labour inputs in the two countries.

    Release date: 2007-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M1996003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity analysis is one of the major foundations of the analysis of long-term economic growth. It is important to study productivity in order to identify the factors that contribute to it and to explore the relationship that exists between productivity, growth and international competitiveness.

    Statistics Canada produces partial productivity indexes for some 30 industries and the business sector of the economy on an annual basis. However, little is known about the real output, productivity, and price trends in the construction industry. Four opportunities for productivity research in the construction industry are evident, (a) investigation of the available productivity measures, (b) alternative approaches to the implicit methods currently used in the compilation of output price indexes, (c) estimation of productivity within particular sectors of the construction industry, and (d) comparison of productivity on an interprovincial or international basis.

    In this paper we will focus on the first two of the four alternatives and will give examples of the last two. In particular, by formalizing the adjustments that are made to the input factors used in the development of output indexes, we contend that the result will be more impartial and enduring. Generally, our goal is to investigate and promote measures that will be available and attractive to the construction industry as it begins to demand more electronic information. The purpose is to derive, eventually, some new productivity estimates based upon the best available statistics.

    Release date: 1997-05-05
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2007014
    Description:

    The Canadian Productivity Accounts (CPA) of Statistics Canada maintain two multifactor productivity (MFP) programs.

    The Major Sector Multifactor Productivity Program develops the indexes of MFP for the total business sector and major industry groups in the business sector.

    The Industry Multifactor Productivity Program or the Industry KLEMS Productivity Program develops the industry productivity database that includes MFP indexes, output, capital (K), labour (L), energy (E), materials (M) and services (S) inputs for the individual industries of the business sector at various levels of industry aggregation. This paper describes the methodologies and data sources that are used to construct the major sector MFP indexes and the industry productivity database (or the KLEMS database). More specifically, this paper is meant to:provide a background of the major sector MFP program and the industry KLEMS productivity program;present the methodology for measuring MFP;describe the data sources and data available from the MFP programs;present a quality rating of the industry KLEMS productivity data; anddescribe the research agenda related to the MFP program.

    Release date: 2007-12-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-002-M2001001
    Description:

    This document describes the sources, concepts and methods utilized by the Canadian Productivity Accounts and discusses how they compare with their U.S. counterparts.

    Release date: 2004-12-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-002-M
    Description:

    This series of articles provides users with an understanding of the notion of productivity and the underlying statistical standards, concepts, and methods used to compile the productivity statistics.

    This series enables users to better judge the economic significance, quality and accuracy of the productivity statistics. It is particularly designed for those who regularly use the productivity estimates, such as academics and economic and financial analysts. It is also a reference for others who use the productivity figures less frequently, such as students of economics.

    Release date: 2004-12-24
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