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All (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2018030
    Description:

    This infographic presents data on the political engagement of Canadians for both women and men. It highlights issues such as participation in political activities, reasons for not voting, levels of interest in politics and ways in which people participate.

    Release date: 2018-10-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114669
    Description:

    This study examines the changes in the voting rates of Canadian citizens between the 2011 and 2015 federal elections, on the basis of supplementary questions that were added to the Labour Force Survey (LFS) shortly after these elections. The focus is on population groups who saw the largest increases in voting rates over the period.

    Release date: 2016-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114232
    Description:

    This study provides new information on the political participation of youth aged 15 to 24 years. It examines the likelihood of voting in the next federal election (as reported in 2013) and participation in the previous election, as well as participation in non-electoral political activities, such as signing petitions or participating in demonstrations or public meetings. The study also provides information on the degree of civic engagement of youth, which is often perceived as a key indicator of social capital.

    Release date: 2015-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2015006
    Description:

    This report presents the most recent findings on the participation of Canadians in groups, organizations and associations. The focus is on the types of groups that people participate in and how often they participate. This report also examines the prevalence of the various forms of political participation, including electoral participation.

    Release date: 2015-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111629
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article investigates the factors associated with voting during the May 2011 federal election. Voting rates are examined across personal, family and labour market characteristics. Multivariate techniques are used to account for many of the characteristics associated with voting. The study is based on several supplemental questions, commissioned by Elections Canada, that were added to the May Labour Force Survey. Voting trends and international comparisons, based on administrative data, are also presented.

    Release date: 2012-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111399
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) from 2003 and 2008 to explore consumers' propensity to choose some products and boycott others based on ethical criteria. It compares the evolution of citizens' ethical consumption to other types of political participation. It also provides information on the persons most likely to choose or boycott a product for ethical reasons.

    Release date: 2011-01-25

  • Table: 89-640-X
    Description:

    This publication contains tables on civic and political participation, sense of belonging to Canada, and unpaid work. The source of the data is the 2008 General Social Survey, Cycle 22: Social Networks. This cycle collected information on changes respondents had experienced in the last 12 months, the resources they used during these transitions and unmet needs for help. Questions were also asked on contact with family and friends, volunteering and trust in people and institutions.

    Release date: 2009-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200800110606
    Description:

    Data from election polls in the US are typically presented in two-way categorical tables, and there are many polls before the actual election in November. For example, in the Buckeye State Poll in 1998 for governor there are three polls, January, April and October; the first category represents the candidates (e.g., Fisher, Taft and other) and the second category represents the current status of the voters (likely to vote and not likely to vote for governor of Ohio). There is a substantial number of undecided voters for one or both categories in all three polls, and we use a Bayesian method to allocate the undecided voters to the three candidates. This method permits modeling different patterns of missingness under ignorable and nonignorable assumptions, and a multinomial-Dirichlet model is used to estimate the cell probabilities which can help to predict the winner. We propose a time-dependent nonignorable nonresponse model for the three tables. Here, a nonignorable nonresponse model is centered on an ignorable nonresponse model to induce some flexibility and uncertainty about ignorabilty or nonignorability. As competitors we also consider two other models, an ignorable and a nonignorable nonresponse model. These latter two models assume a common stochastic process to borrow strength over time. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are used to fit the models. We also construct a parameter that can potentially be used to predict the winner among the candidates in the November election.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060089610
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the frequency with which Canadians follow news and current affairs, the variety of media sources they use and whether this affects their level of civic participation, as measured by involvement in non-voting political activities.

    Release date: 2007-06-19
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 89-640-X
    Description:

    This publication contains tables on civic and political participation, sense of belonging to Canada, and unpaid work. The source of the data is the 2008 General Social Survey, Cycle 22: Social Networks. This cycle collected information on changes respondents had experienced in the last 12 months, the resources they used during these transitions and unmet needs for help. Questions were also asked on contact with family and friends, volunteering and trust in people and institutions.

    Release date: 2009-06-26
Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2018030
    Description:

    This infographic presents data on the political engagement of Canadians for both women and men. It highlights issues such as participation in political activities, reasons for not voting, levels of interest in politics and ways in which people participate.

    Release date: 2018-10-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114669
    Description:

    This study examines the changes in the voting rates of Canadian citizens between the 2011 and 2015 federal elections, on the basis of supplementary questions that were added to the Labour Force Survey (LFS) shortly after these elections. The focus is on population groups who saw the largest increases in voting rates over the period.

    Release date: 2016-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114232
    Description:

    This study provides new information on the political participation of youth aged 15 to 24 years. It examines the likelihood of voting in the next federal election (as reported in 2013) and participation in the previous election, as well as participation in non-electoral political activities, such as signing petitions or participating in demonstrations or public meetings. The study also provides information on the degree of civic engagement of youth, which is often perceived as a key indicator of social capital.

    Release date: 2015-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2015006
    Description:

    This report presents the most recent findings on the participation of Canadians in groups, organizations and associations. The focus is on the types of groups that people participate in and how often they participate. This report also examines the prevalence of the various forms of political participation, including electoral participation.

    Release date: 2015-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111629
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article investigates the factors associated with voting during the May 2011 federal election. Voting rates are examined across personal, family and labour market characteristics. Multivariate techniques are used to account for many of the characteristics associated with voting. The study is based on several supplemental questions, commissioned by Elections Canada, that were added to the May Labour Force Survey. Voting trends and international comparisons, based on administrative data, are also presented.

    Release date: 2012-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111399
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) from 2003 and 2008 to explore consumers' propensity to choose some products and boycott others based on ethical criteria. It compares the evolution of citizens' ethical consumption to other types of political participation. It also provides information on the persons most likely to choose or boycott a product for ethical reasons.

    Release date: 2011-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200800110606
    Description:

    Data from election polls in the US are typically presented in two-way categorical tables, and there are many polls before the actual election in November. For example, in the Buckeye State Poll in 1998 for governor there are three polls, January, April and October; the first category represents the candidates (e.g., Fisher, Taft and other) and the second category represents the current status of the voters (likely to vote and not likely to vote for governor of Ohio). There is a substantial number of undecided voters for one or both categories in all three polls, and we use a Bayesian method to allocate the undecided voters to the three candidates. This method permits modeling different patterns of missingness under ignorable and nonignorable assumptions, and a multinomial-Dirichlet model is used to estimate the cell probabilities which can help to predict the winner. We propose a time-dependent nonignorable nonresponse model for the three tables. Here, a nonignorable nonresponse model is centered on an ignorable nonresponse model to induce some flexibility and uncertainty about ignorabilty or nonignorability. As competitors we also consider two other models, an ignorable and a nonignorable nonresponse model. These latter two models assume a common stochastic process to borrow strength over time. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are used to fit the models. We also construct a parameter that can potentially be used to predict the winner among the candidates in the November election.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060089610
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the frequency with which Canadians follow news and current affairs, the variety of media sources they use and whether this affects their level of civic participation, as measured by involvement in non-voting political activities.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20070029646
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Researchers believe that the factors which influence whether or not a person will participate in the political arena can be classified into four main categories: socio-demographic characteristics, sense of mastery, political socialization, and news consumption. This article uses the 2003 General Social Survey to identify the relative importance of these different factors on the probability of engaging in non-voting political activity.

    Release date: 2007-06-19
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