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All (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018408
    Description:

    This paper investigates the effect of unemployment on life satisfaction from a comparative perspective. It also tests whether the link between unemployment and life satisfaction is moderated or reinforced by contextual unemployment across regions within a country—either through a negative spillover or a positive social-norm effect, or both.

    Release date: 2018-07-31

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201700114766
    Description:

    This is a Health fact sheet about life satisfaction among Canadians. Life satisfaction is a personal subjective assessment of global well-being. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2017-03-22

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201500114197
    Description:

    This will feature a selection of health indicators for the 34 census metropolitan areas (CMA) in Canada. Data at the provincial and national level will be presented and compared with the data for the CMA.

    Release date: 2015-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014006
    Description:

    This report examines Canadians’ social connections, using the 2013 General Social Survey on Social Identity. Three aspects are examined 1) size of social networks (number and type of social connections), 2) frequency and types of communication, and 3) characteristics of friends. The report ends with a short discussion of the possible impact of social connections on Canadians’ overall quality of life.

    Release date: 2014-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014357
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An emerging area of subjective well-being (SWB) research is centered on the differences in the levels of SWB both across countries and among geographic regions within a country. The consideration of geographic differences would extend our knowledge about the determinants of SWB from "internal" factors of personality traits and individuals' socio-demographic characteristics to "external factors" embedded in individuals' environments. An issue with important theoretical and policy implications is whether the income of others in the same geographic area is associated with individuals' SWB. The association could be positive if people benefit from the improved resources, amenities, and social capital in high-income areas. The association could also be negative if people tend to emulate the lifestyles of their more affluent neighbours. Related empirical studies so far have not come to a consensus on this question.

    The present study attempts to contribute to this issue in two significant ways. First, this study examines whether the effect of the average income in a geographic area (locality income) on SWB is sensitive to the scale of geographic units. With a very large sample of survey respondents nested within three hierarchical levels of geographic areas, this study provides reliable estimates of the association of SWB with average incomes in immediate neighbourhoods (defined as "census dissemination areas"), local communities ("census tracts"), and municipalities ("census subdivisions"). Second, this study examines how the choice of control variables influences the estimated effect of locality income. By considering the effects of individual demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, self-evaluated general health, and area-level attributes in a sequential manner, it is possible to discuss the likely mechanisms through which locality income is related to individuals' SWB.

    Release date: 2014-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013351
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Measures of subjective well-being are increasingly prominent in international policy discussions about how best to measure "societal progress" and the well-being of national populations. This has implications for national statistical offices, as calls have been made for them to include measures of subjective well-being in their household surveys (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development 2013). Statistics Canada has included measures of subjective well-being - particularly life satisfaction - in its surveys for twenty-five years, although the wording of these questions and the response categories have evolved over time. Statistics Canada's General Social Survey (GSS) and Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) offer a valuable opportunity to examine the stability of life satisfaction responses and their correlates from year to year using a consistent analytical framework.

    Release date: 2013-10-11

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201300111845
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This will feature a selection of health indicators for the 34 census metropolitan areas (CMA) in Canada. Data at the provincial and national level will be presented and compared with the data for the CMA.

    Release date: 2013-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110850
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several decades of tourism research generally conclude that the benefits people expect to derive from their travel experience are better predictors of their travel behaviour than their income or other socio-demographic characteristics. Using the 2006 Travel and Activity Motivation Survey, this article uses an eight-point index to quantify the value of the three most popular benefits of vacation or pleasure travel: rest and relaxation; nurturing family and friendship ties; and learning and discovery. We compare the value of a given benefit for different kinds of travellers, and compare the value of one benefit relative to another.

    Release date: 2009-05-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010046115
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article profiles people who describe themselves as workaholics and then investigates how they rate the quality of their lives.

    Release date: 2002-03-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-586-X
    Description:

    In today's emerging knowledge societies, the capacity of labour markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning has therefore become an issue of considerable strategic importance. But how are the Canadian markets for adult education and training evolving?

    This report presents, for the first time, evidence on the development of adult education and training in Canada during the last decade. Examined are not only broad trends in the demand and supply of adult education, but also the factors contributing to observed developments. Survey data collected in 1998 allow readers to gauge the current situation and make comparisons over time and across Canadian provinces. The findings indicate, first, that growth in adult education participation has slowed in recent years, and second, that there are major differences between the provinces in who gets trained, and how much.

    Release date: 2001-05-10
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Public use microdata: 82M0010X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) program is designed to collect information related to the health of the Canadian population. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994. The institutional component includes long-term residents (expected to stay longer than six months) in health care facilities with four or more beds in Canada with the principal exclusion of the Yukon and the Northwest Teritories. The document has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the 1996-1997 microdata file containing survey results. The main variables include: demography, health status, chronic conditions, restriction of activity, socio-demographic, and others.

    Release date: 2000-08-02

  • Public use microdata: 82F0001X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) uses the Labour Force Survey sampling frame to draw a sample of approximately 22,000 households. The sample is distributed over four quarterly collection periods. In each household, some limited information is collected from all household members and one person, aged 12 years and over, in each household is randomly selected for a more in-depth interview.

    The questionnaire includes content related to health status, use of health services, determinants of health and a range of demographic and economic information. For example, the health status information includes self-perception of health, a health status index, chronic conditions, and activity restrictions. The use of health services is probed through visits to health care providers, both traditional and non-traditional, and the use of drugs and other medications. Health determinants include smoking, alcohol use, physical activity and in the first survey, emphasis has been placed on the collection of selected psycho-social factors that may influence health, such as stress, self-esteem and social support. The demographic and economic information includes age, sex, education, ethnicity, household income and labour force status.

    Release date: 1995-11-21
Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018408
    Description:

    This paper investigates the effect of unemployment on life satisfaction from a comparative perspective. It also tests whether the link between unemployment and life satisfaction is moderated or reinforced by contextual unemployment across regions within a country—either through a negative spillover or a positive social-norm effect, or both.

    Release date: 2018-07-31

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201700114766
    Description:

    This is a Health fact sheet about life satisfaction among Canadians. Life satisfaction is a personal subjective assessment of global well-being. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2017-03-22

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201500114197
    Description:

    This will feature a selection of health indicators for the 34 census metropolitan areas (CMA) in Canada. Data at the provincial and national level will be presented and compared with the data for the CMA.

    Release date: 2015-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014006
    Description:

    This report examines Canadians’ social connections, using the 2013 General Social Survey on Social Identity. Three aspects are examined 1) size of social networks (number and type of social connections), 2) frequency and types of communication, and 3) characteristics of friends. The report ends with a short discussion of the possible impact of social connections on Canadians’ overall quality of life.

    Release date: 2014-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014357
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An emerging area of subjective well-being (SWB) research is centered on the differences in the levels of SWB both across countries and among geographic regions within a country. The consideration of geographic differences would extend our knowledge about the determinants of SWB from "internal" factors of personality traits and individuals' socio-demographic characteristics to "external factors" embedded in individuals' environments. An issue with important theoretical and policy implications is whether the income of others in the same geographic area is associated with individuals' SWB. The association could be positive if people benefit from the improved resources, amenities, and social capital in high-income areas. The association could also be negative if people tend to emulate the lifestyles of their more affluent neighbours. Related empirical studies so far have not come to a consensus on this question.

    The present study attempts to contribute to this issue in two significant ways. First, this study examines whether the effect of the average income in a geographic area (locality income) on SWB is sensitive to the scale of geographic units. With a very large sample of survey respondents nested within three hierarchical levels of geographic areas, this study provides reliable estimates of the association of SWB with average incomes in immediate neighbourhoods (defined as "census dissemination areas"), local communities ("census tracts"), and municipalities ("census subdivisions"). Second, this study examines how the choice of control variables influences the estimated effect of locality income. By considering the effects of individual demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, self-evaluated general health, and area-level attributes in a sequential manner, it is possible to discuss the likely mechanisms through which locality income is related to individuals' SWB.

    Release date: 2014-02-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013351
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Measures of subjective well-being are increasingly prominent in international policy discussions about how best to measure "societal progress" and the well-being of national populations. This has implications for national statistical offices, as calls have been made for them to include measures of subjective well-being in their household surveys (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development 2013). Statistics Canada has included measures of subjective well-being - particularly life satisfaction - in its surveys for twenty-five years, although the wording of these questions and the response categories have evolved over time. Statistics Canada's General Social Survey (GSS) and Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) offer a valuable opportunity to examine the stability of life satisfaction responses and their correlates from year to year using a consistent analytical framework.

    Release date: 2013-10-11

  • Stats in brief: 82-625-X201300111845
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This will feature a selection of health indicators for the 34 census metropolitan areas (CMA) in Canada. Data at the provincial and national level will be presented and compared with the data for the CMA.

    Release date: 2013-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110850
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several decades of tourism research generally conclude that the benefits people expect to derive from their travel experience are better predictors of their travel behaviour than their income or other socio-demographic characteristics. Using the 2006 Travel and Activity Motivation Survey, this article uses an eight-point index to quantify the value of the three most popular benefits of vacation or pleasure travel: rest and relaxation; nurturing family and friendship ties; and learning and discovery. We compare the value of a given benefit for different kinds of travellers, and compare the value of one benefit relative to another.

    Release date: 2009-05-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010046115
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article profiles people who describe themselves as workaholics and then investigates how they rate the quality of their lives.

    Release date: 2002-03-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-586-X
    Description:

    In today's emerging knowledge societies, the capacity of labour markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning has therefore become an issue of considerable strategic importance. But how are the Canadian markets for adult education and training evolving?

    This report presents, for the first time, evidence on the development of adult education and training in Canada during the last decade. Examined are not only broad trends in the demand and supply of adult education, but also the factors contributing to observed developments. Survey data collected in 1998 allow readers to gauge the current situation and make comparisons over time and across Canadian provinces. The findings indicate, first, that growth in adult education participation has slowed in recent years, and second, that there are major differences between the provinces in who gets trained, and how much.

    Release date: 2001-05-10
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