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All (42) (0 to 10 of 42 results)

  • Table: 75-001-X201200211650
    Description:

    This overview presents data on absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics, using data from the Labour Force Survey. Only full-time employees are included in this analysis.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Table: 71-211-X
    Description:

    This document contains a breakdown of absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics. Only full-time employees have been considered in this analysis.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Table: 75-001-X201100211452
    Description:

    This overview presents data on absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics, using data from the Labour Force Survey. Only full-time employees have been considered in this analysis.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211429
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Mortgages consistently account for two-thirds of Canadians' household debt. This study uses the Survey of Household Spending to examine the characteristics of mortgagees and the size of their payments. It focuses on mortgage payments expressed as a percentage of disposable income-the mortgage-liability ratio. This analysis highlights differences in personal characteristics, and spending and saving patterns among households with higher and lower mortgage-liability ratios.

    Release date: 2011-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110705
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from the General Social Survey confirm what most working age Canadians probably already know; that is, they are working longer hours either on the job or at home on unpaid domestic chores.

    In 2005, for example, people between the ages of 25 and 54, the years when women and men are both most likely to be part of the paid work force and raising families, spent about 9 hours per day on all work activities, including paid and unpaid work. This compared with slightly over 8 hours per day nearly 20 years ago in 1986.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810813215
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    More than a quarter of employed Canadians work something other than a regular daytime schedule regular evenings or nights, rotating or split shifts, casual or on-call jobs or irregular shifts. This article focuses on shift work among full-time workers aged 19 to 64 and looks at where and among whom it is most prevalent. Work-life balance, role overload and other indicators of well-being are also examined.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008055
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Dropout rates, defined as the proportion of 20 to 24 year-olds without a high school diploma and not attending school, have been trending downward. Data from the Labour Force Survey shows that the rate for men fell from 21% in 1990/1991 to 14% in 2004/2005; for women, the rates were 16% in 1990/1991 and 9% in 2004/2005. Many dropouts later return to school, taking advantage of the 'second-chance' educational opportunities offered by provinces and institutions across Canada.

    This report uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey to analyze the determinants of the return-to-school. The analysis finds that dropout rates are lower among young women than among young men and that, if they do dropout before completing high school, young women are also more likely to return to school than young men.

    Young male and female dropouts are influenced by different factors in their decision to return to school. For young male dropouts, two of the strongest predictors of the decision to return to school are their parents' education and having taken, in high school, a mathematics course designed to prepare them for postsecondary studies. Young men who dropped out in their last year of high school were more likely to return to school than their counterparts who had dropped out earlier. For young women, time elapsed since leaving school is the most influential factor. However, young women who left school due to personal reasons (most often, pregnancy) are 30% more likely to return than other female dropouts.

    Release date: 2008-04-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711210467
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A key family event, the birth of a child also has broader economic implications. If a mother stays home for an extended period after childbirth, her propensity to work in the future may be reduced since a long career interruption can affect job skills and chances of finding a new job. Although the tradition that women withdraw completely from the labour market upon giving birth has long gone, some mothers may still quit their jobs due to work schedule inflexibility, commuting difficulties, or lack of child care services. Although earnings drops were greater for the early 2000s cohorts of mothers than for the mid-1980s cohorts, the earnings recovery process was shorter.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12
Data (6)

Data (6) ((6 results))

  • Table: 75-001-X201200211650
    Description:

    This overview presents data on absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics, using data from the Labour Force Survey. Only full-time employees are included in this analysis.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Table: 71-211-X
    Description:

    This document contains a breakdown of absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics. Only full-time employees have been considered in this analysis.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Table: 75-001-X201100211452
    Description:

    This overview presents data on absences from work for personal reasons (illness or disability and personal or family responsibilities) by various demographic and labour market characteristics, using data from the Labour Force Survey. Only full-time employees have been considered in this analysis.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Table: 71-001-P
    Description:

    This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.

    Release date: 2002-08-09

  • Public use microdata: 12M0010X
    Description:

    Cycle 10 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on the respondent's family. Topics covered include marital history, common- law unions, biological, adopted and step children, family origins, child leaving and fertility intentions.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1997-02-28
Analysis (35)

Analysis (35) (0 to 10 of 35 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211429
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Mortgages consistently account for two-thirds of Canadians' household debt. This study uses the Survey of Household Spending to examine the characteristics of mortgagees and the size of their payments. It focuses on mortgage payments expressed as a percentage of disposable income-the mortgage-liability ratio. This analysis highlights differences in personal characteristics, and spending and saving patterns among households with higher and lower mortgage-liability ratios.

    Release date: 2011-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110705
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from the General Social Survey confirm what most working age Canadians probably already know; that is, they are working longer hours either on the job or at home on unpaid domestic chores.

    In 2005, for example, people between the ages of 25 and 54, the years when women and men are both most likely to be part of the paid work force and raising families, spent about 9 hours per day on all work activities, including paid and unpaid work. This compared with slightly over 8 hours per day nearly 20 years ago in 1986.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810813215
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    More than a quarter of employed Canadians work something other than a regular daytime schedule regular evenings or nights, rotating or split shifts, casual or on-call jobs or irregular shifts. This article focuses on shift work among full-time workers aged 19 to 64 and looks at where and among whom it is most prevalent. Work-life balance, role overload and other indicators of well-being are also examined.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008055
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Dropout rates, defined as the proportion of 20 to 24 year-olds without a high school diploma and not attending school, have been trending downward. Data from the Labour Force Survey shows that the rate for men fell from 21% in 1990/1991 to 14% in 2004/2005; for women, the rates were 16% in 1990/1991 and 9% in 2004/2005. Many dropouts later return to school, taking advantage of the 'second-chance' educational opportunities offered by provinces and institutions across Canada.

    This report uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey to analyze the determinants of the return-to-school. The analysis finds that dropout rates are lower among young women than among young men and that, if they do dropout before completing high school, young women are also more likely to return to school than young men.

    Young male and female dropouts are influenced by different factors in their decision to return to school. For young male dropouts, two of the strongest predictors of the decision to return to school are their parents' education and having taken, in high school, a mathematics course designed to prepare them for postsecondary studies. Young men who dropped out in their last year of high school were more likely to return to school than their counterparts who had dropped out earlier. For young women, time elapsed since leaving school is the most influential factor. However, young women who left school due to personal reasons (most often, pregnancy) are 30% more likely to return than other female dropouts.

    Release date: 2008-04-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711210467
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A key family event, the birth of a child also has broader economic implications. If a mother stays home for an extended period after childbirth, her propensity to work in the future may be reduced since a long career interruption can affect job skills and chances of finding a new job. Although the tradition that women withdraw completely from the labour market upon giving birth has long gone, some mothers may still quit their jobs due to work schedule inflexibility, commuting difficulties, or lack of child care services. Although earnings drops were greater for the early 2000s cohorts of mothers than for the mid-1980s cohorts, the earnings recovery process was shorter.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313159
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As rapid technological change drives the growth of a knowledge-based economy and creates the need for new job-related skills, an aging population means that fewer new workers are available to meet these needs. As a result, adults are re-entering the educational system in increasing numbers, even though they are likely to face more challenges than regular students, in terms of balancing work, education, and family responsibilities. Going back to school is an investment that is expected to yield returns, but who actually benefits from adult schooling and by how much?

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017033
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Delayed marriage, postponement of children, and adults with increasingly long-lived parents have given rise to the 'sandwich generation'. These are individuals caught between the often conflicting demands of caring for children and caring for seniors. Although still relatively small (712,000 in 2002), the ranks of the sandwich generation are likely to grow.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410313114
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510413139
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines "absenteeism" employee absences that are avoidable, habitual and unscheduled.

    Release date: 2005-04-22
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

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