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All (6)

All (6) ((6 results))

  • Table: 62-202-X
    Description:

    This publication presents statistical highlights and key tables from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS). This annual survey collects information about expenditures by households and families in Canada on a wide variety of goods and services, as well as their dwelling characteristics and possession of household equipment such as appliances, audio and video equipment, and vehicles. The publication also includes analytical text, summary-level tables, a detailed table, notes and definitions, and information about survey methodology and data quality.

    Release date: 2010-12-17

  • 74C0002
    Description:

    This survey provides information on the terms and conditions of employer-sponsored pension plans. Topics include: number of plans and members by areas of employment, jurisdiction of plans registration, type of plan, public and private sectors, funding instrument, employee/employer contribution formula, benefit method, contributory and contributory plans, annual contributions made to a registered pension plan.

    Release date: 2010-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310113082
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at why people contribute to registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs). It examines personal and family characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-596-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For the first time in a Canadian asset and debt survey, the 1999 Survey of Financial Security (SFS) includes an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer (i.e.registered) pension plans (RPPs). Although not an asset in the sense that it can be sold and used for another purpose, employer pension plan benefits are nonetheless an important part of the net worth of Canadians, as they provide many with at least a portion of their income in retirement. For many families, it is likely to be one of the largest assets.

    The 1999 SFS provides the most comprehensive picture of the net worth of Canadians yet available. Information was collected on the value of all major financial and non-financial assets, and on the money owing on mortgages, vehicles, credit cards, student loans and other debts. The value of these assets, less the debts, is referred to as net worth. Data collection took place from May to July 1999, in all provinces. Although this is the seventh time that an asset and debt survey has been conducted by Statistics Canada, over 15 years have passed since the last survey was done, in 1984. Many changes have taken place since that time, in both the economy and the structure of families. Survey findings are available in the report The assets and debts of Canadians: an overview of the results of the Survey of Financial Security (catalogue no. 13-595-XIE).

    Release date: 2001-12-14

  • Table: 74-401-S
    Description:

    Retirement issues have risen to the forefront of socio-economic debate in Canada through the nineties and will likely gain importance as we enter the new millennium. Employer pension plans are one of the primary programs in place to provide workers with income after retirement.

    Pension plans in Canada: statistical highlights and key tables presents information on the terms, conditions and membership on all employers sponsored pension plans in Canada. This supplement to publication Pension plans in Canada (74-401-XIB) provides analysis and data on registered pension plans. The topics covered include province of employment, labour force/paid workers coverage, type of plan (defined benefit and defined contributions), size of plan, public and private sectors, contributory and non-contributory plans, employee and employer contributions.

    Release date: 2000-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1996090
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the structure of payroll taxes and documents evidence on the level, growth and role of each component over the last three decades for Canada and for each province. Levied by both the federal and provincial governments, payroll taxes in Canada include four major components: i) unemployment insurance (UI) premiums; ii) Canada/Quebec Pension Plan (C/QPP) contributions; iii) workers compensation (WC) premiums; and iv) the provincial health/post-secondary education (H/E) tax levied by Quebec, Manitoba, Ontario and Newfoundland. While the UI and C/QPP components are levied on both employers and employees, the WC and H/E components are levied on employers only. Our main findings are 1) payroll taxes have increased substantially over the last three decades in Canada as a whole and in every province; 2) the structure, level, growth and role of each component of payroll taxes vary remarkably from one province to another; 3) the expansion of the UI component in recent years has been the largest contributor to the rise in payroll taxes across every province in the country; and 4) despite significant growth in recent years, payroll taxes are still much lower in Canada than in most other western industrialized countries.

    Release date: 1996-02-28
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 62-202-X
    Description:

    This publication presents statistical highlights and key tables from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS). This annual survey collects information about expenditures by households and families in Canada on a wide variety of goods and services, as well as their dwelling characteristics and possession of household equipment such as appliances, audio and video equipment, and vehicles. The publication also includes analytical text, summary-level tables, a detailed table, notes and definitions, and information about survey methodology and data quality.

    Release date: 2010-12-17

  • Table: 74-401-S
    Description:

    Retirement issues have risen to the forefront of socio-economic debate in Canada through the nineties and will likely gain importance as we enter the new millennium. Employer pension plans are one of the primary programs in place to provide workers with income after retirement.

    Pension plans in Canada: statistical highlights and key tables presents information on the terms, conditions and membership on all employers sponsored pension plans in Canada. This supplement to publication Pension plans in Canada (74-401-XIB) provides analysis and data on registered pension plans. The topics covered include province of employment, labour force/paid workers coverage, type of plan (defined benefit and defined contributions), size of plan, public and private sectors, contributory and non-contributory plans, employee and employer contributions.

    Release date: 2000-10-31
Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) ((3 results))

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310113082
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at why people contribute to registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs). It examines personal and family characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-596-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For the first time in a Canadian asset and debt survey, the 1999 Survey of Financial Security (SFS) includes an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer (i.e.registered) pension plans (RPPs). Although not an asset in the sense that it can be sold and used for another purpose, employer pension plan benefits are nonetheless an important part of the net worth of Canadians, as they provide many with at least a portion of their income in retirement. For many families, it is likely to be one of the largest assets.

    The 1999 SFS provides the most comprehensive picture of the net worth of Canadians yet available. Information was collected on the value of all major financial and non-financial assets, and on the money owing on mortgages, vehicles, credit cards, student loans and other debts. The value of these assets, less the debts, is referred to as net worth. Data collection took place from May to July 1999, in all provinces. Although this is the seventh time that an asset and debt survey has been conducted by Statistics Canada, over 15 years have passed since the last survey was done, in 1984. Many changes have taken place since that time, in both the economy and the structure of families. Survey findings are available in the report The assets and debts of Canadians: an overview of the results of the Survey of Financial Security (catalogue no. 13-595-XIE).

    Release date: 2001-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1996090
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the structure of payroll taxes and documents evidence on the level, growth and role of each component over the last three decades for Canada and for each province. Levied by both the federal and provincial governments, payroll taxes in Canada include four major components: i) unemployment insurance (UI) premiums; ii) Canada/Quebec Pension Plan (C/QPP) contributions; iii) workers compensation (WC) premiums; and iv) the provincial health/post-secondary education (H/E) tax levied by Quebec, Manitoba, Ontario and Newfoundland. While the UI and C/QPP components are levied on both employers and employees, the WC and H/E components are levied on employers only. Our main findings are 1) payroll taxes have increased substantially over the last three decades in Canada as a whole and in every province; 2) the structure, level, growth and role of each component of payroll taxes vary remarkably from one province to another; 3) the expansion of the UI component in recent years has been the largest contributor to the rise in payroll taxes across every province in the country; and 4) despite significant growth in recent years, payroll taxes are still much lower in Canada than in most other western industrialized countries.

    Release date: 1996-02-28
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