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All (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-222-X
    Description:

    Labour Statistics at a Glance features short analytical articles on specific topics of interest related to Canada's labour market. The studies examine recent or historical trends using data produced by the Labour Statistics Division, i.e., the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment Payrolls and Hours, the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey, the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey and the Employment Insurance Statistics Program.

    Release date: 2019-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 71-222-X2019003
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) to highlight selected characteristics of multiple jobholders in 2018 and discuss notable shifts over the past few decades.

    Release date: 2019-10-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-503-X
    Description:

    Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.

    Women in Canada allows readers to better understand the experience of women compared to that of men. Recognizing that women are not a homogenous group and that experiences differ not only across gender but also within gender groups, Women in Canada includes chapters on immigrant women, women in a visible minority, Aboriginal women, senior women, and women with participation and activity limitations.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • 4. Paid work Archived
    Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111387
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Paid Work chapter of Women in Canada examines the labour market experiences of women and compares it to that of men. In particular, it compares the employment and unemployment trends by age for women and men. It also discusses how part-time work, multiple job holding, unionization, self-employment and the work experiences of mothers have changed over time.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2004005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin focuses on self-employment activity among workers aged 20 to 64 years. This analysis is based on data from the Census of Population, 1981 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2004071
    Description:

    This paper looks at non-farm trends for rural women using data from the 1981 to 2001 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2004-07-23

  • Table: 71-001-P
    Description:

    This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.

    Release date: 2002-08-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036215
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This research paper documents patterns of self-employment among postsecondary graduates categorized by level of study in the five years immediately following their graduation.

    Release date: 2002-06-26
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 71-001-P
    Description:

    This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.

    Release date: 2002-08-09
Analysis (21)

Analysis (21) (0 to 10 of 21 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-222-X
    Description:

    Labour Statistics at a Glance features short analytical articles on specific topics of interest related to Canada's labour market. The studies examine recent or historical trends using data produced by the Labour Statistics Division, i.e., the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment Payrolls and Hours, the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey, the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey and the Employment Insurance Statistics Program.

    Release date: 2019-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 71-222-X2019003
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) to highlight selected characteristics of multiple jobholders in 2018 and discuss notable shifts over the past few decades.

    Release date: 2019-10-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-503-X
    Description:

    Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.

    Women in Canada allows readers to better understand the experience of women compared to that of men. Recognizing that women are not a homogenous group and that experiences differ not only across gender but also within gender groups, Women in Canada includes chapters on immigrant women, women in a visible minority, Aboriginal women, senior women, and women with participation and activity limitations.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • 4. Paid work Archived
    Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111387
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Paid Work chapter of Women in Canada examines the labour market experiences of women and compares it to that of men. In particular, it compares the employment and unemployment trends by age for women and men. It also discusses how part-time work, multiple job holding, unionization, self-employment and the work experiences of mothers have changed over time.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-614-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    By examining newcomers' progress over time, the LSIC affords the possibility of assisting researchers and policy-makers to go beyond existing descriptions of immigrant integration outcomes to an examination of how newcomers achieve these outcomes - in essence, the "how" and "why" dimensions. While the full value of the survey will be reached when the three waves of data collection are completed, this first wave of data provides important benchmark information.

    The focus of this publication is on the early settlement experiences of immigrants, from pre-migration to the first six months after arrival. First an overview of the LSIC population is provided, looking at both pre-migration characteristics as well as those at arrival. This is followed by a comprehensive look at the first six months of the settlement process, looking at things such as health, housing and mobility; education and training taken since arrival; employment, income and the general perception of the immigrant's settlement experience. Finally, a more in-depth look at problems and difficulties newcomers experience in four key areas of integration is presented: accessing health services, finding housing, accessing education and training and finding employment. Challenges to integration are examined in terms of what help was needed, received and from whom, or needed and not received.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2004005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin focuses on self-employment activity among workers aged 20 to 64 years. This analysis is based on data from the Census of Population, 1981 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2004071
    Description:

    This paper looks at non-farm trends for rural women using data from the 1981 to 2001 Censuses of Population.

    Release date: 2004-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010036215
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This research paper documents patterns of self-employment among postsecondary graduates categorized by level of study in the five years immediately following their graduation.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002183
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Changes in the labour market such as an increase in the incidence of part-time, part-year work, multiple job holding and self-employment have often been conjectured as demand-driven shifts - that is, that they have resulted from a lack of more traditional job opportunities rather than in response to workers' changing preferences. Yet while the issue of non-standard work is an interesting and important one, there is relatively little existing empirical evidence on the topic.

    The general purpose of this paper is to report the results of an empirical analysis that exploits the self-employment status indicator available in the National Graduates Survey (and Follow-Up) databases. It documents and analyses the patterns of self-employment amongst several cohorts of Canadian post-secondary graduates in the first five years following graduation. More specifically, it provides solid empirical documentation of the incidence of self-employment (levels, patterns, trends) amongst recent college and university graduates, overall, and broken down by degree level, sex and year of graduation. This paper also addresses the issue of whether self-employment tends to be the preferred employment option (for those who enter it), or the result of a lack of suitable "conventional" employment opportunities, or some combination of the two.

    There are two over-arching conclusions to be drawn from the analysis. First, the incidence of self-employment was relatively stable for the first three cohorts of graduates covered in the analysis. The overall rates ranged from 6.5 to 11.1 percent amongst male graduates and from 3.2 to 6.7 percent for females. The rates tended to be higher for some (but not all) graduates of the most recent cohort (graduates of 1995). Second, the evidence generally points to self-employment representing a relatively attractive job status on average: For every cohort the rates of self-employment rise from the first interview following graduation (after two years) to the second (after five years), an interval over which job opportunities generally improve significantly for graduates; Simple point-in-time (cross-sectional) comparisons of earnings, the job-education skill match, and job satisfaction levels suggest that although the results are somewhat mixed, there is little evidence that the self-employment status is generally characterized by less favourable outcomes, and is perhaps particularly marked by generally higher (not lower) overall levels of job satisfaction;Finally, both the conventional cross-sectional earnings model and the difference equations which control for various fixed effects with which job status might be correlated, further point to self-employment being a higher-paying (and therefore more attractive) job status than the conventional paid worker status.

    Release date: 2002-03-21
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