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  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19960022829
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Breast cancer is the leading form of cancer diagnosed in Canadian women (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer), accounting for about 30% of all new cases. After age 30, incidence rates begin to rise, and the highest rates are among women aged 60 and over. Canadian incidence rates have increased slowly and steadily since 1969, rising most rapidly among women aged 50 and over. Canada's rates are among the highest of any country in the world, ranking second only to those in the United States. After decades of little change, breast cancer mortality rates for all ages combined have declined slightly since 1990. While not dramatic, this decline is statistically significant and is consistent with similar decreases in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia. Breast cancer survival rates are relatively more favourable than those of other forms of cancer. Survival rates are better for younger women and for women whose cancer was detected at an early stage. This article presents breast cancer data from the Canadian Cancer Registry, the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System, and vital statistics mortality data, all of which are maintained by the Health Statistics Division of Statistics Canada. These data are provided to Statistics Canada by the provincial and territorial cancer and vital statistics registrars.

    Release date: 1996-11-18

  • 2. A job to die for Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022889
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at causes, counts and rates of work-related deaths by selected demographic and job characteristics. It also touches briefly on the financial cost of such fatalities.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1996091
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Introduction: In the current economic context, all partners in health care delivery systems, be they public or private, are obliged to identify the factors that influence the utilization of health care services. To improve our understanding of the phenomena that underlie these relationships, Statistics Canada and the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation have just set up a new database. For a representative sample of the population of the province of Manitoba, cross-sectional microdata on individuals' health and socio-economic characteristics were linked with detailed longitudinal data on utilization of health care services.

    Data and methods: The 1986-87 Health and Activity Limitation Survey, the 1986 Census and the files of Manitoba Health were matched (without using names or addresses) by means of the CANLINK software. In the pilot project, 20,000 units were selected from the Census according to modern sampling techniques. Before the files were matched, consultations were held and an agreement was signed by all parties in order to establish a framework for protecting privacy and preserving the confidentiality of the data.

    Results: A matching rate of 74% was obtained for private households. A quality evaluation based on the comparisons of names and addresses over a small subsample established that the overall concordance rate among matched pairs was 95.5%. The match rates and concordance rates varied according to age and household composition. Estimates produced from the sample accurately reflected the socio-demographic profile, mortality, hospitalization rate, health care costs and consumption of health care by Manitoba residents.

    Discussion: The matching rate of 74% was satisfactory in comparison with the response rates reported in most population surveys. Because of the excellent concordance rate and the accuracy of the estimates obtained from the sample, this database will provide an adequate basis for studying the association between socio-demographic characteristics, health and health care utilization in province of Manitoba.

    Release date: 1996-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19960033016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Analyses based on census data, vital statistics, and data from the Health and Activity Limitation Surveys show that immigrants, especially those from non-European countries, had a longer life expectancy and more years of life free of disability and dependency than did the Canadian-born. But while immigrants were less likely than the Canadian-born to be disabled, they were only slightly less likely to be dependent on others for help with activities of daily living. The reasons for immigrants' longevity and good health are likely related to the "health immigrant effect"

    Release date: 1996-03-13
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  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19960022829
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Breast cancer is the leading form of cancer diagnosed in Canadian women (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer), accounting for about 30% of all new cases. After age 30, incidence rates begin to rise, and the highest rates are among women aged 60 and over. Canadian incidence rates have increased slowly and steadily since 1969, rising most rapidly among women aged 50 and over. Canada's rates are among the highest of any country in the world, ranking second only to those in the United States. After decades of little change, breast cancer mortality rates for all ages combined have declined slightly since 1990. While not dramatic, this decline is statistically significant and is consistent with similar decreases in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia. Breast cancer survival rates are relatively more favourable than those of other forms of cancer. Survival rates are better for younger women and for women whose cancer was detected at an early stage. This article presents breast cancer data from the Canadian Cancer Registry, the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System, and vital statistics mortality data, all of which are maintained by the Health Statistics Division of Statistics Canada. These data are provided to Statistics Canada by the provincial and territorial cancer and vital statistics registrars.

    Release date: 1996-11-18

  • 2. A job to die for Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022889
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at causes, counts and rates of work-related deaths by selected demographic and job characteristics. It also touches briefly on the financial cost of such fatalities.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1996091
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Introduction: In the current economic context, all partners in health care delivery systems, be they public or private, are obliged to identify the factors that influence the utilization of health care services. To improve our understanding of the phenomena that underlie these relationships, Statistics Canada and the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation have just set up a new database. For a representative sample of the population of the province of Manitoba, cross-sectional microdata on individuals' health and socio-economic characteristics were linked with detailed longitudinal data on utilization of health care services.

    Data and methods: The 1986-87 Health and Activity Limitation Survey, the 1986 Census and the files of Manitoba Health were matched (without using names or addresses) by means of the CANLINK software. In the pilot project, 20,000 units were selected from the Census according to modern sampling techniques. Before the files were matched, consultations were held and an agreement was signed by all parties in order to establish a framework for protecting privacy and preserving the confidentiality of the data.

    Results: A matching rate of 74% was obtained for private households. A quality evaluation based on the comparisons of names and addresses over a small subsample established that the overall concordance rate among matched pairs was 95.5%. The match rates and concordance rates varied according to age and household composition. Estimates produced from the sample accurately reflected the socio-demographic profile, mortality, hospitalization rate, health care costs and consumption of health care by Manitoba residents.

    Discussion: The matching rate of 74% was satisfactory in comparison with the response rates reported in most population surveys. Because of the excellent concordance rate and the accuracy of the estimates obtained from the sample, this database will provide an adequate basis for studying the association between socio-demographic characteristics, health and health care utilization in province of Manitoba.

    Release date: 1996-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19960033016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Analyses based on census data, vital statistics, and data from the Health and Activity Limitation Surveys show that immigrants, especially those from non-European countries, had a longer life expectancy and more years of life free of disability and dependency than did the Canadian-born. But while immigrants were less likely than the Canadian-born to be disabled, they were only slightly less likely to be dependent on others for help with activities of daily living. The reasons for immigrants' longevity and good health are likely related to the "health immigrant effect"

    Release date: 1996-03-13
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