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  • Table: 61-517-X
    Description:

    The Inter-corporate ownership product is the most authoritative and comprehensive source of information available on corporate ownership; a unique directory of "who owns what" in Canada. It provides up-to-date information reflecting recent corporate takeovers and other substantial changes. Ultimate corporate control is determined through a careful study of holdings by corporations, the effects of options, insider holdings, convertible shares and interlocking directorships. The number of corporations that make up the hierarchy of structures totals approximately 50,000.

    The information that is presented is based on non-confidential returns filed by Canadian corporations under the Corporations Returns Act and on research using public sources such as internet sites. The data are presented in an easy-to-read tiered format, illustrating at a glance the hierarchy of subsidiaries within each corporate structure. The entries for each corporation provide both the country of control and the country of residence.

    The product covers every individual corporation that is part of a group of commonly controlled corporations with combined assets exceeding 600 million dollars or combined revenue exceeding 200 million dollars. Individual corporations with debt obligations or equity owing to non-residents exceeding a net book value of 1 million dollars are covered as well.

    Release date: 2019-10-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010060
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper asks whether synergies or managerial discipline operates in different ways across small versus large plants to affect the likelihood of mergers. Our findings indicate that those characteristics which provide the type of synergies upon which ownership changes rely are important factors leading to plant-ownership changes across most size classes. The magnitudes, however, are different across plant-size classes, with synergies generally being more important in larger plants.

    Foreign plants in all size classes are more likely to be taken over. The effective rates of control change differ much more in the small than in the larger size classes. Compared to domestic plants, multinational plants in the smaller size classes contain relatively more of the type of intangible capital that makes them attractive vehicles for the transmission of new knowledge via takeover.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009056
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of plants in the manufacturing sector undergoing changes in ownership to further our understanding of the underlying causes of mergers and acquisitions. Previous Canadian studies (Baldwin 1995; Baldwin and Caves 1991) compare the performance of merged plants at the beginning and the end of the 1970s. This paper examines annual changes that occurred over the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to provide a longer-run perspective. In doing so, it outlines the amount of change taking place (both the number of plants affected and the share of employment) and the characteristics of plants that led to their takeover. Differences between foreign and domestic takeovers are also examined.

    Release date: 2009-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper's main objective is to provide a concise synthesis of a wide array of data and research on multinationals originating in Statistics Canada, focusing on both historical and current studies.

    Chapter 2 discusses the macroeconomic contribution of foreign multinationals, focusing on two leading indicators of foreign multinational activity, foreign control and foreign direct investment. This chapter also describes studies that evaluate the contribution that foreign-controlled companies make to aggregate trade flows, linking changes in multinational trade intensity to the strategic reorganization of their production activities.

    Chapter 3 concentrates on the strategies and activities of foreign multinationals that are relevant to ongoing debates over whether the presence of foreign multinationals promotes, or hampers, Canada's industrial competitiveness. This chapter first examines evidence that domestic and foreign firms respond differently to domestic market conditions. Second, it asks whether foreign firms compete in different ways than domestic firms do. Third, it examines the relative emphasis that foreign multinationals place on innovation and technology practices, and reports on the relationship between these activities and observable market outcomes. Fourth, it reports on the contribution that foreign-controlled firms make to productivity growth. Fifth, it discusses new research that focuses on the relationship between foreign ownership and head-office employment. Studies in these areas speak directly to the issue of whether foreign multinationals truncate or develop their corporate activities in host markets.

    Chapter 4 focuses on studies that examine the foreign activities of Canadian-owned multinationals and how their domestic plants compare to foreign-controlled plants operating in Canada.

    Chapter 5 offers an appraisal of Statistics Canada's research on multinationals.

    Release date: 2007-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060049179
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    After having run deficits for almost 30 years, corporations have emerged with significant surplus positions in the last decade. This has placed the corporate sector in a new role - that of increasingly supplying funds to the rest of the economy.

    Release date: 2006-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2004070
    Description:

    The objective of this study is to provide up-to-date measures of the concentration of the manufacturing industries in the Canadian food-processing sector.

    Release date: 2004-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents data on cross-border mergers and acquisitions from a Canadian perspective, for 1997 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2002057
    Description:

    This study provides a financial profile of Canadian food industry corporations that were acquired during the period 1996 to 1998.

    Release date: 2002-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020016343
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Hospital characteristics that may indicate restructuring, such as a recent administrative merger or a decrease in average length of stay, were not associated with 30-day re-admissions of pneumonia or acute myocardial infarction patients. Patients with two or more related hospital admissions in the previous year were at increased risk of re-admission.

    Release date: 2002-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002189
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring size of entry. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the information we have on the amount of entry in Canada.

    The paper also fulfils another purpose. Some studies have focused on cross-country comparisons (Geroski and Schwalbach 1991; OECD 2001). Interpretation of the results of these studies is difficult unless methodological issues regarding how entry is measured are addressed. Without an understanding of the extent to which different databases produce different results, international comparisons are difficult to evaluate. Cross-country comparisons that are derived from extremely different data sources may be misleading because of the lack of comparability.

    Since there is more than one reliable database that can be used to estimate entry in Canada, this paper asks how measured entry rates vary across different Canadian databases. By examining the difference in entry rates produced by these databases, we provide an estimate of the range or confidence interval that should be used in evaluating whether there are real differences in measured entry rates across countries. We also offer guidance as to the questions that should be asked about the databases used by researchers who conduct international studies. Finally, we make suggestions as to areas of comparison on which international studies should focus.

    Release date: 2002-05-29
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 61-517-X
    Description:

    The Inter-corporate ownership product is the most authoritative and comprehensive source of information available on corporate ownership; a unique directory of "who owns what" in Canada. It provides up-to-date information reflecting recent corporate takeovers and other substantial changes. Ultimate corporate control is determined through a careful study of holdings by corporations, the effects of options, insider holdings, convertible shares and interlocking directorships. The number of corporations that make up the hierarchy of structures totals approximately 50,000.

    The information that is presented is based on non-confidential returns filed by Canadian corporations under the Corporations Returns Act and on research using public sources such as internet sites. The data are presented in an easy-to-read tiered format, illustrating at a glance the hierarchy of subsidiaries within each corporate structure. The entries for each corporation provide both the country of control and the country of residence.

    The product covers every individual corporation that is part of a group of commonly controlled corporations with combined assets exceeding 600 million dollars or combined revenue exceeding 200 million dollars. Individual corporations with debt obligations or equity owing to non-residents exceeding a net book value of 1 million dollars are covered as well.

    Release date: 2019-10-10
Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010060
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper asks whether synergies or managerial discipline operates in different ways across small versus large plants to affect the likelihood of mergers. Our findings indicate that those characteristics which provide the type of synergies upon which ownership changes rely are important factors leading to plant-ownership changes across most size classes. The magnitudes, however, are different across plant-size classes, with synergies generally being more important in larger plants.

    Foreign plants in all size classes are more likely to be taken over. The effective rates of control change differ much more in the small than in the larger size classes. Compared to domestic plants, multinational plants in the smaller size classes contain relatively more of the type of intangible capital that makes them attractive vehicles for the transmission of new knowledge via takeover.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009056
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of plants in the manufacturing sector undergoing changes in ownership to further our understanding of the underlying causes of mergers and acquisitions. Previous Canadian studies (Baldwin 1995; Baldwin and Caves 1991) compare the performance of merged plants at the beginning and the end of the 1970s. This paper examines annual changes that occurred over the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to provide a longer-run perspective. In doing so, it outlines the amount of change taking place (both the number of plants affected and the share of employment) and the characteristics of plants that led to their takeover. Differences between foreign and domestic takeovers are also examined.

    Release date: 2009-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper's main objective is to provide a concise synthesis of a wide array of data and research on multinationals originating in Statistics Canada, focusing on both historical and current studies.

    Chapter 2 discusses the macroeconomic contribution of foreign multinationals, focusing on two leading indicators of foreign multinational activity, foreign control and foreign direct investment. This chapter also describes studies that evaluate the contribution that foreign-controlled companies make to aggregate trade flows, linking changes in multinational trade intensity to the strategic reorganization of their production activities.

    Chapter 3 concentrates on the strategies and activities of foreign multinationals that are relevant to ongoing debates over whether the presence of foreign multinationals promotes, or hampers, Canada's industrial competitiveness. This chapter first examines evidence that domestic and foreign firms respond differently to domestic market conditions. Second, it asks whether foreign firms compete in different ways than domestic firms do. Third, it examines the relative emphasis that foreign multinationals place on innovation and technology practices, and reports on the relationship between these activities and observable market outcomes. Fourth, it reports on the contribution that foreign-controlled firms make to productivity growth. Fifth, it discusses new research that focuses on the relationship between foreign ownership and head-office employment. Studies in these areas speak directly to the issue of whether foreign multinationals truncate or develop their corporate activities in host markets.

    Chapter 4 focuses on studies that examine the foreign activities of Canadian-owned multinationals and how their domestic plants compare to foreign-controlled plants operating in Canada.

    Chapter 5 offers an appraisal of Statistics Canada's research on multinationals.

    Release date: 2007-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060049179
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    After having run deficits for almost 30 years, corporations have emerged with significant surplus positions in the last decade. This has placed the corporate sector in a new role - that of increasingly supplying funds to the rest of the economy.

    Release date: 2006-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2004070
    Description:

    The objective of this study is to provide up-to-date measures of the concentration of the manufacturing industries in the Canadian food-processing sector.

    Release date: 2004-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents data on cross-border mergers and acquisitions from a Canadian perspective, for 1997 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2002057
    Description:

    This study provides a financial profile of Canadian food industry corporations that were acquired during the period 1996 to 1998.

    Release date: 2002-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20020016343
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Hospital characteristics that may indicate restructuring, such as a recent administrative merger or a decrease in average length of stay, were not associated with 30-day re-admissions of pneumonia or acute myocardial infarction patients. Patients with two or more related hospital admissions in the previous year were at increased risk of re-admission.

    Release date: 2002-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002189
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring size of entry. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the information we have on the amount of entry in Canada.

    The paper also fulfils another purpose. Some studies have focused on cross-country comparisons (Geroski and Schwalbach 1991; OECD 2001). Interpretation of the results of these studies is difficult unless methodological issues regarding how entry is measured are addressed. Without an understanding of the extent to which different databases produce different results, international comparisons are difficult to evaluate. Cross-country comparisons that are derived from extremely different data sources may be misleading because of the lack of comparability.

    Since there is more than one reliable database that can be used to estimate entry in Canada, this paper asks how measured entry rates vary across different Canadian databases. By examining the difference in entry rates produced by these databases, we provide an estimate of the range or confidence interval that should be used in evaluating whether there are real differences in measured entry rates across countries. We also offer guidance as to the questions that should be asked about the databases used by researchers who conduct international studies. Finally, we make suggestions as to areas of comparison on which international studies should focus.

    Release date: 2002-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035967
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1997, 41% of engineering services firms identified themselves as innovators, but only 4% of them had introduced breakthrough products or processes that had the potential of putting these firms in the role of global leaders. There's more than meets the eye in interpreting the myriad of indicators describing the "system of innovation".

    Release date: 2001-10-31
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19990015650
    Description:

    The U.S. Manufacturing Plant Ownership Change Database (OCD) was constructed using plant-level data taken from the Census Bureau's Longitudinal Research Database (LRD). It contains data on all manufacturing plants that have experienced ownership change at least once during the period 1963-92. This paper reports the status of the OCD and discuss its research possibilities. For an empirical demonstration, data taken from the database are used to study the effects of ownership changes on plant closure.

    Release date: 2000-03-02
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